8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 1

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 1

There are plenty of career alternatives for nurses. Being a nurse is one of the most respected and rewarding jobs globally. But if you don’t want to do bedside nursing? Are there any career alternatives for nurses? 
 

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses to Choose From

 
Unlike other jobs, nursing has increased career growth. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects a growth of 7% in nursing employment over the next few years. That said, you should be able to pick a job within this field that does not involve working as a traditional nurse. 
 
If you are wondering what kind of careers you can work as a non-traditional nurse, here are your options:
 

1. Nutritionist

 
A nurse nutritionist is an excellent option for those nurses who are into healthy diets and lifestyles. Your job is to consult patients and help improve their health through diet and nutrition.
 
Working in this nursing field allows you to work in a medical facility with patients who are dealing with medical conditions involving diet. One of your jobs includes encouraging them to eat and offering healthy options.
 
Extra training is needed for nurses who are planning to become a nutritionist. The average income for nurse nutritionists is around $50,737 yearly. It also depends on their training and certifications. 
 

2. Nurse Manager

 
If you enjoy working in the hospital, a nurse manager is a good career alternative for nurses.  Nurse managers are also known as nurse administrators. They help manage and supervise registered nurses at work. 
 
As a nurse manager, your role is to run a nursing department, supervise teams of nurses, or help manage the clinical facility. This position often requires a Master’s in Nursing degree (MSN).
 
The average income for nurse managers is around $101,000 per year. California ranks as the state for highest-paid nurse managers. 
 

3. Nurse Researcher

 
Nurse researchers learn about medicine, how medications interact, and the study of the human body. If you enjoy researching scientific data, this job is a good choice. 
 
Many nurse researchers work in laboratories or universities. They conduct research to study, test their research, and help find a way to improve the results. Researching diseases, treatments, and other health-related topics are valuable in the healthcare industry. 
 
A nurse researcher also writes books, consults, and teaches classes. They also speak at conferences. The average income for nurse researchers is around $95,000, yearly. 
 

4. Telemedicine Nurse

 
One of the best career alternatives for nurses belongs to telemedicine nurses. This job combines technology and nursing skills to help patients within the comfort of their homes. It is a good option for nurses who want to help patients who are living in remote areas. They also help patients suffering from chronic conditions who need to stay at home and not go to a hospital. 
 
As the pandemic rolls on, it’s reported that telehealth visits have increased to 50% as of March 2020. If you want to in work in this area, experience as a floor nurse is a must. The average income for telemedicine nurses is around $75,000. 
 

5. Forensic Nurse

 
For fans of forensic science, working in this field would be a dream come true. And for nurses interested in this field, working as a forensic nurse is an option for you. 
 
The work of a forensic nurse is often stressful but very rewarding. Your job includes working with the legal systems and providing care for victims of violent crimes
 
One of your primary duties is to gather medical evidence to use in court proceedings. You may even testify in court to back up the pieces of evidence you present. Many forensic nurses often work in correctional facilities or various hospital settings. An estimated $89,000 is the average nurse pay in this field. 
 

6. Nurse Lobbyist

 
Another job that you must consider is becoming a nurse lobbyist. What do these nurses do? As a nurse lobbyist, you will work for communities, states, and countries. You will also work alongside lawmakers that government agencies use nurse lobbyists. 
 
These nurses help analyze data and health laws to improve them. The average income for nurse lobbyists is around $100,000. But if you have a higher degree or education and years of experience,  you can earn even more. 
 

7. Clinical Nurse Educator

 
If you love working in an academic setting, this is your chance to work as a clinical nurse educator. The main job description for this profession is to teach and mentor aspiring nurses. 
 
Your general role is a teacher nurse. You will be administering tests, overseeing internships, and facilitating lessons. You will also be mentoring nursing students in class or hospital settings.
 
A clinical nurse educator may also work in a medical facility. They help develop opportunities for current staff nurses and offer them ongoing training. The average income for clinical nurse educators is around $87,700. 
 

8. Nurse consultant

 
Many nurse consultants work with legal teams, offering their advice and consultation to those working in cases involving medical details. These nurses help assist, check medical charts, and often act as expert witnesses. 
 
They can also work for a medical facility, hospital, or nursing home. They offer their consultation and recommend individual treatment plans for patients.
 
Those who are already experienced in this field help check the current qualifications of nursing staff and help improve them.
 

In Closing

 
Your career as a nurse is not a boring one; there is always something to do! Of course, there are other career alternatives for nurses that you can choose from. We will tackle them in Part 2 of this post. And now that you know the different options for your career as a nurse, go ahead and check them out. You might find something you will enjoy doing for a long time!

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