Preparing for the Future: 4 Educational Paths for Nursing Professionals

Preparing for the Future: 4 Educational Paths for Nursing Professionals

Pursuing a nursing education can lead you to a lucrative and rewarding career. According to the BLS, there are about 194,500 job openings for registered nurses every year. That number is expected to increase by 9% between 2020 and 2030, making it easy for aspiring nurses to find work. The median salary for registered nurses is $77,600, higher than the national average.

To prepare for a career in nursing, there are many educational paths to choose from. Most nurses start out with a bachelor’s degree, but those that seek higher positions can pursue a master’s or doctoral degree. Below, we’ve outlined four educational paths nursing professionals can pursue.

Associate Degree In Nursing

The fastest way to open doors to nursing roles is to take an associate degree in nursing (ADN). ADNs are undergraduate degree programs that focus on the technical and practical, teaching core nursing knowledge and clinical nursing skills. Shorter ADN programs take 18 months to complete, but the average ADN program will run for 2 years. ADN graduates can pursue a number of basic nursing roles, such as personal care nursing, care facility nursing, rehabilitation nursing, and public health nursing. The average ADN graduate earns $70,000 annually.

Bachelor Of Science In Nursing

Aspiring nurses that want to pursue more in-depth educational programs can take a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Whereas ADNs last two years, BSNs last four. BSNs go beyond the technical to teach the theoretical. On top of honing clinical skills, the most comprehensive BSN programs provide training in administrative roles, leadership roles, and management roles. Naturally, BSN graduates have more career options than ADN graduates to become nurse practitioners. The average annual salary of a BSN graduate is $84,000.

Master Of Science In Nursing

After completing your BSN, you can pursue a Master of Science In Nursing (MSN). Applicants of MSN programs are required to first earn a bachelor’s degree, though that degree does not have to be related to nursing. The main difference between a BSN and an MSN is specialization. BSN programs cover broader nursing topics, while MSN programs require each student to select a specific nurse practitioner concentration. MSN graduates typically go on to become nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, or clinical nurse specialists. Experienced MSN graduates can make up to $110,000.

Doctor Of Nursing Practice

The highest level of education a nurse can attain is a doctor of nursing practice (DNP). To qualify for a DNP, applicants must first complete an MSN or a master’s degree in a health-related field. DNP programs typically take two to three years to complete. The goal of a DNP program is to train students for high-level healthcare positions by teaching them advanced theory and healthcare procedures. DNP graduates can take roles in research, academia, policy management, and healthcare management. The average yearly income of a DNP graduate is $126,000.

Furthermore, nurses have a wide range of choices when it comes to concentrations. Some of the most in-demand nurses today include nurse advocates, nurse educators, nurse researchers, and travel nurses. Nurses have a lot of flexibility when it comes to the kind of work they can do, and how they can attain the education they need to qualify for their target roles. That level of flexibility is one of the many things that make nursing such an attractive career.

Post solely for the use of cupofnurses.com By Roxanne Brent

 

 

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