8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

Our previous post tackled the eight career alternatives for nurses that you can choose to work in if you are looking for a career change. In this second part, we have added other nursing career options that you might enjoy doing in this second part. 

What are Your Choices?

If you want to boost your career as a nurse, trying these alternatives may work out for you. Here are eight choices to choose from:

Academic Nurse Writer

Have you heard about this position? An academic nurse writer is a job where nurses work outside of patient care. Nurse writers often enjoy a lucrative career in healthcare-related companies like pharmaceutical, insurance, and other patient care services. 

What they do is they create nursing-related content for websites, like training manuals or textbooks which tailors the information to the general public od other nursing professionals. 

It is an excellent opportunity for nurses who have a good background in research, writing, communication, and health services. And the best part of this is that all you need is a BSN to qualify. The average income for an academic nurse writer is $73,500 each year. 

Nurse Health Coach

Do you have an interest in working with one client or patient at a time? How about helping people achieve their health goals? If yes, becoming a nurse health coach is one of the career alternatives for nurses to pursue. 

A nurse health coach is a nurse who works one-on-one with clients to help them keep a healthy lifestyle and prevent health conditions from happening. They usually work in health care facilities, insurance companies, and social services [1]. 

Nurses in this job often create a diet plan, monitor clients, and establish safe exercise routines. It is also part of their work to help motivate clients to be in their best health. 

To qualify for the position, you should have a BSN. However, some employers don’t mind. Nurses with an associate degree can also be eligible for this position. If you want to earn more, it would be best to have a BSN degree instead. The average income for this position is $49,000 per year.

Public Health Nurse

Another exciting career alternative for nurses is to work as a public health nurse. This job addresses community health care, and nurses who choose to work in this area have the opportunity to be in social service agencies. They can also work in schools and nonprofit groups. 

The main job of nurses in this profession is to identify at-risk groups and individuals and develop preventive care programs. These programs have also been proven helpful, especially now that we are experiencing the stress of this pandemic

For a nurse to qualify for this job, one must have a Master of Science in Nursing degree in addition to their RN license. Both degrees are needed to earn more in this nursing field. The average income for public health nurses is $59,500 per year. 

Hospice Nurse

If you are interested in taking care of patients with Alzheimer’s, terminally ill patients and providing assistance to their families, being a hospice nurse is the ideal job for you. As a hospice nurse, your job is to administer pain medication, provide nursing care, and monitor the patient’s vital signs. 

If your patient is at the end-stage of life, maintaining comfort is also an essential part of your job. The hospice nurse also must provide emotional and educational support to the patient’s family. 

A BSN degree is needed for a nurse to qualify for this job. Additional hospice care and palliative nurse certifications are also helpful for nurses seeking employment. The average salary for a hospice nurse is $70,000 each year or more, depending on the certificate and training. 

Dialysis Nurse

One of the most in-demand jobs for nurses belongs to this area. Usually, dialysis nurses work for nursing facilities, hospitals, clinics, or private dialysis nurses. They care for patients who have kidney-related illnesses, where they develop treatment plans and conduct dialysis procedures for the patients. 

It would be best if you had at least a BSN and RN to qualify for the job. Other employers may also require candidates to be certified nephrology nurses or have nurse dialysis credentials to further allow for the position. An average salary for dialysis nurses is $71,100 per year. 

Legal Nurse Consultant

A legal nurse consultant is a nurse who specializes in researching medical and disability cases, employment records, and other legal documents. They also make recommendations that give legal proceedings. insurance cases and law enforcement investigations the information they need. 

Interested nurses must be licensed RNs who have completed an associate degree in this field. If you have a BSN with clinical and case management experiences, specialized legal certification, and paralegal training, you can also be a legal nurse consultant. 

You might also consider becoming a nurse attorney if you are interested in pursuing a law degree if you already have a BSN. The average income for a legal nurse consultant is $79,000 to $80,000 per year. 

Disease Prevention Nurse

Nurses who want a career in the nursing field but does not require them to be in a hospital setting can work as disease prevention nurse. Their job is to research diseases, how it spreads to patients, the community, and health care workers. 

Once they have the data they need, disease prevention nurses will analyze it and decide how to contain it, prevent it from spreading, and more. Nurses in this area can work in nursing homes, hospitals, and even private practices. 

Before qualifying for the position, applicants must have nursing experience first. They are also required to have at least a BSN under their belt. The average income for disease prevention nurses is $85,000 or more, depending on the degree they hold and nursing experience.  

Flight Nurse

Do you enjoy traveling? Are you a nurse who isn’t bothered by flying? If yes, then being a flight nurse is perfect! As one of the best nursing career jobs, this is a popular alternative for nurses who do not want to work in hospitals [2].
 
One of your primary duties as a flight nurse is to handle stressful situations while on the flight. It could be an emergency situation too, for example, a passenger on board had a heart attack. It is your role to provide emergency aid.
 
Flight nurses can also work on rescue planes where they help provide emergency care. It usually involves patients transported to hospitals via airlift.
 
Usually, flight nurses work in trauma centers, hospitals, fire departments, and many others. According to reports, this job will grow by 15% by 2026. Depending on their employers, flight nurses can earn $67,000 to $80,000 per year.

What is the Best Nursing Career Option?

All nursing fields offer unique experiences and may help increase your skills. The best ones are the ones you enjoy working as a nurse. Whether you choose to be a legal nurse consultant or a dialysis nurse, loving the job and providing the best nursing care to your patients matter most! 

To know more about nursing career options, click here for the first part.

 

EP 181: 7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

EP 181: 7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

Our diet plays a big role in keeping our bodies in shape. As nurses, we owe our bodies healthy and nutritious food. When we eat a well-balanced diet, we have more energy to do our job. It is why it’s best to know the 7 foods that help nurses gain energy during a 12-hour shift. Eating the right food will give you the best energy and avoid the stress that a 12-hour shift can give. 

In this episode, we will talk about the 7 best foods you can eat to keep up with your long shifts. We also had the chance to talk to Alandra Segoviano. She is a writer for wellandgood.com and is interested in the lifestyle of a nurse.  She is curious about what foods we eat on shift and why.  So if you are as curious as her, then this episode is for you. 

Diet vs. Lifestyle

Temporary Diets don’t work. You must find the food you like to eat and eliminate all the process stuff.

People see the results of diets because they just end up eliminating calories. Any diet will work if you just decrease the number of calories; everyone will find success in that. 

Intermittent fasting is beneficial, especially on nights. 

  • Working all night doesn’t mean you have to eat all night.
  • 16-8 is the one we usually do. We stop eating at midnight. 
  • Different associations with food. It becomes more of a fuel

Benefits of Intermittent fasting:

  1. Increases metabolism
  • In intermittent fasting, your metabolism does not decrease because fasting is short-term.
  • The way intermittent fasting indirectly boosts your metabolism is through norepinephrine. During acute starvation and short-term calorie negligence, your body increases norepinephrine levels. Norepinephrine causes an increase in the release of glucose. 

2. Immune function

  • Autophagy is the process of programmed cell death. It is also the ability to find damaged cells and destroy them.
  • On the immunological level, it is also breaking down white blood cells for resources to rebuild. White blood cells are a general term to associate all our immune cells. Our body naturally breaks down damaged cells and uses those components to create new mature white blood cells for the future.
  • Decreases oxidative stress and inflammation. Long-term effects of oxidation and inflammation increase the risks of developing cancer and other chronic diseases. A decrease in chronic disease, in turn, helps decrease the immune system’s workload.

3. Brain function

  • You take the work and time needed to consume food and put that effort into brain function and mental processing.
  • Increase a hormone called BDNF. Studies show that The chemical Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is decreased in depression and other brain issues. An increase in BDNF can make you feel better on a neurological level.
  • Builds self-control

4. Liquids 

  • You need to drink more water. This especially helps with hunger and craving. 

Food

Meat, including seafood – simple, protein keeps you fuller for longer. It’s the building block of life. 

  • Meat protein vs Plant-based
    • Research shows that meat protein 
      • Meat resulted in a more significant gain in whole-body net protein balance above baseline than the ounce equivalents of plant-based protein food sources. The improvement in whole-body net protein balance was due to increased protein synthesis with all the animal protein sources. In contrast, the egg and pork groups also suppressed protein breakdown compared to plant protein sources [1].
      • Steak, chicken, beef, pork, salmon, and shrimp. 

Fruits

    • Berries
      • Taste the best. Lower in calories and lower in carbs
  • Antioxidants
    • Help keep free radicals under control and helps decrease inflammation.
    • blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries have the highest antioxidant activity of commonly consumed fruits, next to pomegranates.

High in fiber

High nutrition content

      • Vitamins like C, minerals, Magnesium

Vegetables

  • The consistent vegetables we eat are mushrooms, potatoes (sweet and regular), onions, swiss chard, and greens.
  • Explore different vegetables and find ones you can consistently eat.
  • Basic building blocks for life. 
  • The primary source of all major vitamins and minerals for our body to function and present inflammation.

Greek yogurt and peanut butter

    • Unsweetened Greek yogurt with some fruits and granola
  • Great for gut support
      • Probiotics. Make sure it says Live and Active Cultures (LAC)
  • Bone and muscle health
    • Protein, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Oatmeal

    • Oatmeal with milk and butter, not water. 
    • Good source of fiber, protein, and antioxidants. 
  • Beta-glucans
    • Beta-glucans have been tested to lower blood glucose concentrations and decrease hyperlipidemia and hypertension [2].
    • It might prevent the body from absorbing cholesterol from food. They might also stimulate the immune system by increasing chemicals that prevent infections.
      • Essentially helps neutrophils travel to the site of infection faster and improves their potential to eliminate the bacteria they find there.

RX Bars

  • 3 eggwhites
  • 6 almonds 
  • 4 cashews
  • 2 Dates 

Recently – easy-to-eat salads with a choice of meat, romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, sprouts, avocado, red onion 

Primal Kitchen dressings – Cleanest dressing, based on olive and avocado oils. All are healthy foods that help nurses last their 12-hour shifts.

Learn what foods you can eat during your long shifts by watching the full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:44 Peters nightshift nurse life
03:42 Night shift eating pattern
06:44 What veggies and fruits for a nursing shift
10:09 Best protein powders
12:01 Water Intake as a nurse
16:21 Truth about dieting
17:34 Matt’s daily diet
19:55 Easy nursing snacks for nurses
24:05 How to prevent carb crashes and feeling tired
28:17 4 main food categories for good health
29:25 Avoid sugary foods at work
30:46 Caffeinate properly as a nurse
32:49 When do you get used to night shift?

 

Ep. 180: How Your Mindset Affects Your Life with Gary Clinton

Ep. 180: How Your Mindset Affects Your Life with Gary Clinton

How Your Mindset Affects Your Life with Gary Clinton

Your mindset affects your life in ways you don’t even expect. The truth is that many factors could affect our mental health. It could be stress, frustrations, or pent-up emotions that we cannot express. It could also be pressure at work, studies, or it could also be the way you think. We tend to put pressure on ourselves. And when we can’t fight these, it will indeed affect us. It is also the reason why many of us suffer from depression and anxiety. 

But is there a way to combat these mental health issues? How can we keep a healthy mind? And most importantly, how can your mindset affect your health and life in general?

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Gary Clinton. Gary Clinton is a mental health enthusiast passionate about mental health, dreams, nutrition, fitness, and creating a ripple effect on this earth to change human consciousness.  He will help us understand how our mindset affects our life

We talk about the philosophy of life and how Gary overcame depression to become the person he is today.

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know. We are looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

QUESTIONS:

You told us that you lost your father, how did you cope with a death of a loved one? How did it affect your childhood?

  1. What were you trying to emotionally escape from? How did you deal with depression?
  2. What is the value of talking to someone?
  3. How do you clean up the mind?
  4. What are non-negotiable habits? And how important are they?
  5. How do you describe life and suffering in a metaphor?
  6. Any words of wisdom for people suffering from depression?
  7. How do we overcome suffering?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

To learn more about how our mindset works and mental health, check out Gary on Instagram @mentalhealthhelp.ie for more helpful lessons and tips that you can use in life.

Learn more about your mindset by watching this full episode. Click here for the best advice! 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:38 About Gary Clinton
05:58 How acceptance molds our future
07:57 Coping with the loss of a father and Healing Childhood
11:13 Escaping emotions and dealing with depression
14:48 Value of talking to someone
18:13 Goals, Dreams, and going through change
21:36 Shifting perspective
25:39 Tools to keep you on track
27:33 Cleaning up the mind
32:43 The non-negotiable habits
40:18 Metaphors for life and suffering
58:19 Wrapping up the episode

4 Tips to Do the Night Before Your NCLEX Exams

4 Tips to Do the Night Before Your NCLEX Exams

4 Tips to Do the Night Before Your NCLEX Exams

Your NCLEX exams are scheduled for tomorrow; what should you do? Here are four tips to do on the night before your NCLEX exams. 

Helpful Tips to Remember the Night Before Your NCLEX Exams

Congratulations! You are a few tests away from becoming registered healthcare professional. I am proud of your hard work and dedication to finally take the NCLEX exams that will determine your fate as an actual nurse. 

Before you take the examinations tomorrow, remember these tips and apply them where you see fit. What should you do on the night before your NCLEX exams? Here are helpful reminders:

1. Be as ready as you can. 

Cramming at the last minute is not the way to go. During this time, you should be relaxing. Reading your notes for the last time is not going to help you. 

Remember, you already studied for these exams months beforehand, so you must feel confident that you can answer your tests to the best of your abilities. 

Instead of cramming, get enough sleep. You can also review your test instructions, ensure that you have the correct number for your testing room and that all the documents you need for the examination are filed, double-checked, and ready for you tomorrow. 

  • Be sure to set the alarm clock a few hours before the exams. Check your car’s gas and if you have enough to drive yourself to the testing center. 
  • Check your car’s tires, and ensure they are not flat or have issues. You do not want to be late for the exams because of car trouble or miss it because of these issues. 
  • If you don’t have a car, ask someone ahead to drive you to your testing site. You can also book a transportation service if this is a better option.

If you want to take a quick look at all the materials you have been studying, do them at least 48 hours before the exams. It is not advisable to review the night before your exams. It will only make you anxious. Instead, try to relax and go to sleep early.

2. Remind yourself that it is normal to be tense.

Perhaps you have been thinking about many things tonight. Well, if you are – STOP. You will only get yourself worked up and might trigger your anxiety. 

What you can do is practice breathing. If you feel anxious about tomorrow’s exams, pause, take a deep breath, and exhale. Do this as often as you can until you feel better. 

Remind yourself that it is common to feel the jitters the night before the NCLEX exams. After all, this is an important test to take. The tension you feel right now is normal. 

Try to relax; take a nice hot bath, light up some scented candles or diffuse oils. Stressing about the exams tomorrow will not help. You might as well enjoy this time. 

3.  Treat yourself; you deserve it!

The night before you take the exams, eat a good meal. Consider it as your reward. You have been preparing for this moment for many months. Treating yourself to a night dinner is the reward you deserve for all the hard work. 

If you don’t want to eat dinner, get something you have been depriving yourself of for months. Whatever treat you give yourself, reflect on your efforts to get this far. 

NCLEX is not an easy exam; treating yourself is one way to boost your self-confidence and encourage you to do well on your exams tomorrow!

4. Get plenty of sleep.

Once you have eaten, prepared your documents, taken a nice shower, and prepared your clothes for tomorrow, you can go to bed. Say your prayers (if you’re religious of course) and go to sleep early. Don’t stay up late. It will mess with your body clock. You might also wake up late tomorrow, so avoid this. 

Turn off your social media, keep your phone silent, turn off notifications, and get to bed. Being ready for the exams means you must make sacrifices, even for a day. 

If sleeping early means you have to miss your favorite show or not reply to messages for a while, so be it! 

In Closing

Preparing the night before your NCLEX exams is essential. You must not overlook it and be complacent. If you are ready to answer the questions, be prepared physically, mentally, and emotionally. 

The opportunity to pass NCLEX on your first try is a blessing. You should also be ready for it as much as possible. I hope these tips helped you prepare for the exams, good luck!

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

We all die in the end. It sounds morbid, but this is the reality and commonality for us all. For nurses, dealing with a patient’s death can be traumatic in some ways. How do nurses cope with the death of a patient anyway? 

How to Cope with the Death of a Patient

If you are a new nurse and have just experienced the death of a patient, it can be overwhelming. It is not always easy to deal with it. And just because you are a nurse, that does not mean you are immune to grieving. Truth is, it is part of the challenges nurses face. We do grieve for our patients, and we do these seven steps to help us cope with the loss. 

1. Understand that Death is Inevitable.

When you understand that life is a cycle, it is easier to cope with all the stress. We all are bound to die at some point, and while death can’t be avoided, you should accept that this is part of life. Of course, accepting it does not mean you are someone who doesn’t feel anything. You do, but you understand better, and as a nurse, it is part of your understanding that all life comes to an end. 

2. It is part of your job. 

As a nurse, dealing with loss is a daily part of your life. Showing empathy toward your patients is what makes you an excellent nurse, but it can also be painful when you lose a patient. You also mourn the loss whenever you lose a patient, and sometimes, longer than you thought you could. Death becomes personal for nurses with empathy, but they must also remember that it is part of their chosen profession. And as a nurse yourself, you must realize that your profession deals with caring for people, and grieving for your patients means you have done your job. 

3. Talking about it helps.

Being in the healthcare field means you are often surrounded by the sick and dying. Fortunately, you have coworkers and colleagues who have dealt with the same situation before. Whatever you are feeling, they have experienced it too. Processing your emotions out loud to another empathetic nurse can help you with that. Colleagues who have dealt with patient death can often relate to how you feel and may even advise you on what to do.

4. It’s OK to feel how you feel.

Sometimes, as healthcare providers, we often rationalize how we feel about the death of a patient. While this can sometimes help, this is not realistic. Of course, you have to remain as professional as you can be after losing a patient, but you can also feel sad about it. Understand that death is a tricky thing, but you are also entitled to feel how you feel. You can grieve for your patients in your way as long as it doesn’t affect your work. 

5. Take care of yourself.

As nurses, we often form a close bond with our patients. And when we lose that patient, we often find ourselves grieving for them like family. How nurses cope with the death of a patient can sometimes be more personal than anything. However, in the aftermath of this, you need to take care of yourself. Remember, your job as a nurse means taking care of patients. That said, you must also take care of yourself by getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising regularly. 

6. Remember, you are making a big difference.

Part of a nurse’s job is to not only care for patients but their families as well. The loss of a patient can affect family members the most, and as a nurse, you have the opportunity to be there for them too. How you treat family members who suffer and talk to them can make a huge difference in their lives. It can also help them cope with the loss. So, in your little way, you helped them. 

7. Find an outlet to destress. 

Dealing with patient loss is no doubt stressful. How nurses cope with the death of a patient can sometimes be done creatively. If you are a creative nurse, finding an outlet to express your emotions can help you in a big way. You can try crafting, arts or painting, joining an art club, or anything creative. Nurses need a break, too, significantly when they are affected deeply by the death of a patient. Pent-up emotions can be deadly, so finding an outlet to destress helps. 

Your Takeaway

We all deal with death and dying differently. Choosing the path of being a professional nurse means you will be exposed to death more often than you think, so be ready for such cases. Remember that death does not mean you failed as a nurse, nor does it signify the end of patient care. 

Your life and job as a nurse are bittersweet – there will always be ups and downs. Always remember that the way you cared for and loved your patients will be remembered by those around them, so keep doing your best!