Miscommunication Among Nurses and How to Avoid It

Miscommunication Among Nurses and How to Avoid It

Miscommunication Among Nurses and How to Avoid It

Nurses are among the essential workers in the healthcare world, especially now that we have a pandemic. However, miscommunication among nurses is an issue that happens quite often. How can this be avoided? What causes miscommunication among nurses? 

How Can Miscommunication Among Nurses Be Avoided?

There are a couple of ways that nurses can avoid miscommunication. Keep in mind that being able to relay the correct information about their patients can make a difference in nursing care. As a nurse, you must provide accurate data regarding their condition so proper nursing can be given. Here’s how you can do that:

1. Make eye contact when endorsing patients.

There is a sense of relief whenever the shift is over, especially if it has been a toxic one since you first clocked in. While it is exciting to exit the nurse’s station once your shift is over, make proper endorsements first. The best way to ensure no miscommunication is to make eye contact with the next nurse on duty when endorsing the patient’s chart. 

Take the time to explain everything, from the procedures done to the patient, medications given, the diagnosis (if you have to), and even the physician/s who came to check in with them.

Making eye contact gives you the chance to scan for any uncertainty in their face or if they understood what was said to them. It is also the best way to engage someone in a conversation and ensure they listen to what you say. 

2. Use bedside nursing boards.

Bedside nursing boards are also commonly known as bed-census boards. These can help you with an open line of communication among nurses in the team/building, the patient’s families, and you as health care providers.

The boards help with the patient’s condition and communicate with their families and the rest of the hospital staff. Understand that there are tons of healthcare providers in the hospital working on patients. Failing to communicate properly can lead to negative consequences.

Bedside boards are essential in providing reports to the next nurse on duty. It can help them understand what happened during your shift and fill them in on the patient’s history if this is their first time handling them. Bed-census boards also prove to the patient’s families that proper care is given to their loved ones. 

3. Take time to talk to your patients.

Nurses are often busy in each shift, and it is not surprising that they cannot give their patients full attention. However, taking the time to check on your patients, listen to their concerns, and show that you can help are enough to put them at ease. It is also a good nursing quality to have. 

Allowing a few minutes of one-on-one conversation with your patients can be rewarding. It is easier to see how they are improving and establish a sense of trust as their nurse. Although you may not do this every day, it is best to create a routine and stick to it. 

How Can Nurses Improve Their Communication Skills

Improving communication among nurses is possible. To do this, nurses like you practice patience and become better listeners. When you listen, you don’t offer one ear but both. Keep in mind that you are working with other nurses who are also busy. Listening to each other is crucial to providing better services to patients. 
 
You can also avoid communication conflict when you practice active listening. Active listening is repeating the key points of the conversation to the speaker. So, make it a habit to listen to your coworkers and improve your listening skills. 
 
Another way to avoid miscommunication among nurses is not to interrupt the speaker. This could be helpful during endorsements at the end of the shift. Allow the person to finish talking first before asking questions.
 
Keep in mind that even the slightest cues can determine the condition of patients. Resist the urge to ask questions whenever someone is talking. 
 
As a nurse, you must also learn to maintain a positive attitude. Remember, happiness is contagious! Your positive outlook can also affect your coworkers and even your patients.
 
When things get a little serious, be sure to keep your emotions in check. Your nurse training taught you to remain professional and courteous during conversations. No matter how angry or upset you are, keep it cool.
 
Be aware that your emotions can affect others and your ability to communicate at work. When you do so, miscommunication among nurses will not happen.

In Closing

Communication is an essential part of patient care, and when this is done accordingly, it is nurses can work together effectively. If you feel like you or your coworkers are missing out on proper communication, take the step to address this issue. It will surely help your team and other hospital staff to do better as you provide nursing care to your patients. 

 

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

The common causes of nurse burnout are rarely talked about these days. With the pandemic still rolling, nurses often go on with their lives. But the stress and burnout nurses feel are very real. The pandemic affects the work of nurses and the different factors that make their jobs extra challenging. 

The 5 Causes of Nurse Burnout

A nurse’s job is overwhelming and can be a toxic experience when the shifts are long. Of course, nurses are superheroes, and nothing seems to weigh them down. But there are plenty of other reasons why nurses are often exhausted at work. Here are common causes of nurse burnout:

#1. Stressful environment

Most nurses work in a stressful environment and often involve high-stress levels. Nurses who work in particular areas like the Emergency Rooms, Trauma Unit, or Intensive Care deal with traumatic injuries, combative patients, high mortality rates, and ethical dilemmas that put more strain on themselves. As a result, the burnout these nurses face is widespread. 

#2. Short Staff

The shortage of nurses is now a real problem in many hospitals. These days nurses handle more patients nurses than they can, and with the increasing number of Covid patients, it is more likely that nurses are understaffed. There is also an increase in retiring nurses, making it harder for new nurses to adjust to their roles. 

#3. Lack of Sleep

As a nurse, your job often involves working night shifts and long hours. Because of this, many nurses do not get enough sleep. And even if they do, it is not the best quality of sleep either. In a survey conducted by Kronos, 25% of nurses reported suffering from insomnia or chronic fatigue. 

#4. Lack of team support

One of the many reasons for nurse burnout is when team members do not cooperate. Poor teamwork caused by conflicts, lack of communication, and bullying can lead to poor execution of nursing care. It can also lead to a toxic work environment and medical errors if many nurses do not work together. 

#5. Emotional exhaustion

The main job of nurses includes patient care which is the most rewarding aspect of this profession. As a nurse, you form connections with patients and their families when you help and care for them. However, this could also lead to emotional distress for nurses, especially if they are in critical or end-of-life care. 

Nurses who take care of several patients at once can also lead to emotional exhaustion. And nurses who are taking care of more than four patients in one shift have higher risks of burning out and raising each patient’s chances by 23%. 

Other Reasons for Nurse Burnout

While the ones mentioned above are prevalent, there are also other reasons why some nurses are exhausted to the rim. Among these include:

  • Work overload and time pressures
  • Role conflicts and ambiguity
  • Career development issues
  • Being exposed to infectious diseases 
  • Needlestick injuries
  • Work-related threats and violence
  • Difficult patients

How to Know If You are a Burnout Nurse?

There are plenty of signs that you are already burnout as a nurse. While there are signs that you are experiencing total burnout, some nurses quickly dismiss it and continue working. If you are that nurse, then it’s time to sit back and take note of these burnout symptoms. 

Gets sick easily

One of the most common signs of burnout is when you get sick often. A weakened immune system can lead to many gastrointestinal issues, heart problems, and chronic pain. If you are not careful, these can easily manifest after contracting viruses. You also experience constipation, aches, and pains. 

Experiences compassion fatigue

People who become nurses are compassionate by nature. And nurses who often work with the sick and dying tend to lose their compassion after witnessing pain and suffering. Because of this, some nurses detach themselves from patients due to feelings of failure and cynicism toward their job. 

Chronic fatigue

Have you ever felt exhausted but cannot seem to get rid of it no matter how much you rest? Do you go to bed tired but still wake up feeling the same in the morning? It is a common sign of chronic fatigue. As a nurse, this condition is widespread. Extreme physical exhaustion, unable to catch up with sleep, and dozing off at hours when you should be awake are among the most common signs of this condition. It is often felt by nurses who work long hours on consistent shifts. 

Lack of enthusiasm 

When you were a new nurse, working seemed to be an exciting thing. However, as the years go on, this enthusiasm seems to fade. If you ever dread going to work and focus on going home whenever you are there, your confidence in this job is starting to die down. And that is not a good thing. Your lack of enthusiasm may lead to other issues at work.

Feelings of being unvalued

Work is part of a nurse’s life. But when you are overworked as a nurse, you may feel unappreciated and unvalued. And when this goes on for long, feelings of resentment and frustration can happen. This resentment could be towards their job, coworkers, and even their patients. It is not a good state of emotion for a nurse. If this is the case, the best step is to reach out to someone you can talk to about how you feel. You can either discuss this with your supervisor or a therapist to get the help you need.  

Overwhelming anxiety

To the general population, having anxiety is normal. It is also a part of our lives – to experience anxiety. However, when the stress becomes crippling, it can be an issue. Nurses who feel too pressured at work to the point that they cannot function normally can become a problem. Burnout can cause severe stress, which leads to insomnia or delays in daily activities. Nurses cannot give quality care when they are not feeling their best. 

Your Takeaway

These are the common reasons for nurse burnout and when you feel you are going way over than you can carry, take a pause and rest. Ask for sick leave or vacation leave. Take time off to take care of yourself. 

Keep in mind that nurses like you are human too. Do take time to recharge and refresh your mind and body. A few days off work will not hurt you. And remember, you must take care of yourself first before taking care of others. Make your health a priority above all else! 

 

EP 189: Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

EP 189: Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

Nurse-on-nurse violence is a serious issue that’s happening all over the world. An average of two nurses every hour experience being abused in their workplace. And many don’t even file reports about it. 

When we say violence, the first thing that comes to our mind is physical assault but that’s not the only form of violence. In fact, violence also happens in the place of work. OSHA or Occupational Safety Health Administration defines workplace violence as 

“Any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers, and visitors. ” 

In the United States, acts of violence and other injuries are the third-leading causes of fatal occupational injuries. And for nurses, this is sometimes the reality that we face. How can we avoid this? How can we stop nurse-on-nurse violence? And what can we do in case acts of violence occur in our workplace? 

Our Guest

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Phil La Duke. Phil is currently employed as a writer, and board member on over ten medical research oversight boards. We talk about workplace violence and the importance of communication and emotional de-escalation.  

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Share with us your background and experience.
  2. Working with worker safety what are the most common safety issues or injuries?
    • Where are all the fallouts that cause these to happen?
  3. What made you get into safety?
  4. What are the biggest safety issues in hospitals or in healthcare facilities? 
  5. A survey from Beckers Hospital revealed that 92% of healthcare workers have experienced or witnessed violence from a patient or their caregiver.  
    • How can we combat that?
  6. What does it mean to be part of a medical research board?
  7. What made you start writing books?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Do you want to know how we can resolve nurse-on-nurse violence? Click here for the full episode 👇👇👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:21 About Phil La Duke
05:09 How Phil started working in healthcare
07:44 The Just Culture
09:50 Risk-taking decisions
11:26 How Phil came about to workplace violence
16:47 The weird life of Phil La Duke
21:17 Common workplace violence in a hospital
38:00 Interventions to avoid workplace violence
59:31 How to Deescalate
01:17:54 Wrapping up the show

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

Our previous post tackled the eight career alternatives for nurses that you can choose to work in if you are looking for a career change. In this second part, we have added other nursing career options that you might enjoy doing in this second part. 

What are Your Choices?

If you want to boost your career as a nurse, trying these alternatives may work out for you. Here are eight choices to choose from:

Academic Nurse Writer

Have you heard about this position? An academic nurse writer is a job where nurses work outside of patient care. Nurse writers often enjoy a lucrative career in healthcare-related companies like pharmaceutical, insurance, and other patient care services. 

What they do is they create nursing-related content for websites, like training manuals or textbooks which tailors the information to the general public or other nursing professionals. 

It is an excellent opportunity for nurses with a good background in research, writing, communication, and health services. And the best part of this is that all you need is a BSN to qualify. The average income for an academic nurse writer is $73,500 each year. 

Nurse Health Coach

Do you have an interest in working with one client or patient at a time? How about helping people achieve their health goals? If yes, becoming a nurse health coach is one of the career alternatives for nurses to pursue. 

A nurse health coach is a nurse who works one-on-one with clients to help them keep a healthy lifestyle and prevent health conditions from happening. They usually work in healthcare facilities, insurance companies, and social services [1]. 

Nurses in this job often create a diet plan, monitor clients, and establish safe exercise routines. It is also part of their work to help motivate clients to be in their best health. 

To qualify for the position, you should have a BSN. However, some employers don’t mind. Nurses with an associate degree can also be eligible for this position. If you want to earn more, it would be best to have a BSN degree instead. The average income for this position is $49,000 per year.

Public Health Nurse

Another exciting career alternative for nurses is to work as a public health nurse. This job addresses community health care, and nurses who choose to work in this area have the opportunity to be in social service agencies. They can also work in schools and nonprofit groups. 

The main job of nurses in this profession is to identify at-risk groups and individuals and develop preventive care programs. These programs have also been proven helpful, especially now that we are experiencing the stress of this pandemic

For a nurse to qualify for this job, one must have a Master of Science in Nursing degree in addition to their RN license. Both degrees are needed to earn more in this nursing field. The average income for public health nurses is $59,500 per year. 

Hospice Nurse

If you are interested in taking care of patients with Alzheimer’s, and terminally ill patients, and providing assistance to their families, being a hospice nurse is the ideal job for you. As a hospice nurse, your job is to administer pain medication, provide nursing care, and monitor the patient’s vital signs. 

If your patient is at the end stage of life, maintaining comfort is also an essential part of your job. The hospice nurse also must provide emotional and educational support to the patient’s family. 

A BSN degree is needed for a nurse to qualify for this job. Additional hospice care and palliative nurse certifications are also helpful for nurses seeking employment. The average salary for a hospice nurse is $70,000 each year or more, depending on the certificate and training. 

Dialysis Nurse

One of the most in-demand jobs for nurses belongs to this area. Usually, dialysis nurses work for nursing facilities, hospitals, clinics, or private dialysis nurses. They care for patients who have kidney-related illnesses, where they develop treatment plans and conduct dialysis procedures for the patients. 

It would be best if you had at least a BSN and RN to qualify for the job. Other employers may also require candidates to be certified nephrology nurses or have nurse dialysis credentials to further allow for the position. The average salary for dialysis nurses is $71,100 per year. 

Legal Nurse Consultant

A legal nurse consultant is a nurse who specializes in researching medical and disability cases, employment records, and other legal documents. They also make recommendations that give legal proceedings. insurance cases and law enforcement investigations the information they need. 

Interested nurses must be licensed RNs who have completed an associate degree in this field. You can also be a legal nurse consultant if you have a BSN with clinical and case management experience, specialized legal certification, and paralegal training. 

You might also consider becoming a nurse attorney if you are interested in pursuing a law degree if you already have a BSN. The average income for a legal nurse consultant is $79,000 to $80,000 per year. 

Disease Prevention Nurse

Nurses who want a career in the nursing field but does not require them to be in a hospital setting can work as disease prevention nurse. Their job is to research diseases, and how it spreads to patients, the community, and healthcare workers. 

Once they have the data they need, disease prevention nurses will analyze it and decide how to contain it, prevent it from spreading, and more. Nurses in this area can work in nursing homes, hospitals, and even private practices. 

Before qualifying for the position, applicants must have nursing experience first. They are also required to have at least a BSN under their belt. The average income for disease prevention nurses is $85,000 or more, depending on the degree they hold and their nursing experience.  

Flight Nurse

Do you enjoy traveling? Are you a nurse who isn’t bothered by flying? If yes, then being a flight nurse is perfect! As one of the best nursing career jobs, this is a popular alternative for nurses who do not want to work in hospitals [2].
 
One of your primary duties as a flight nurse is to handle stressful situations while on the flight. It could be an emergency situation too, for example, a passenger on board had a heart attack. It is your role to provide emergency aid.
 
Flight nurses can also work on rescue planes where they help provide emergency care. It usually involves patients transported to hospitals via airlift.
 
Usually, flight nurses work in trauma centers, hospitals, fire departments, and many others. According to reports, this job will grow by 15% by 2026. Depending on their employers, flight nurses can earn $67,000 to $80,000 per year.

What is the Best Nursing Career Option?

All nursing fields offer unique experiences and may help increase your skills. The best ones are the ones you enjoy working as a nurse. Whether you choose to be a legal consultant or a dialysis nurse, loving the job and providing the best nursing care to your patients matter most! 

To know more about nursing career options, click here for the first part.

 

EP 181: 7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

EP 181: 7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

7 Foods That Help Nurses Gain Energy During a 12-hour Shift

Our diet plays a big role in keeping our bodies in shape. As nurses, we owe our bodies healthy and nutritious food. When we eat a well-balanced diet, we have more energy to do our job. It is why it’s best to know the 7 foods that help nurses gain energy during a 12-hour shift. Eating the right food will give you the best energy and avoid the stress that a 12-hour shift can give. 

In this episode, we will talk about the 7 best foods you can eat to keep up with your long shifts. We also had the chance to talk to Alandra Segoviano. She is a writer for wellandgood.com and is interested in the lifestyle of a nurse.  She is curious about what foods we eat on shift and why.  So if you are as curious as her, then this episode is for you. 

Diet vs. Lifestyle

Temporary Diets don’t work. You must find the food you like to eat and eliminate all the process stuff.

People see the results of diets because they just end up eliminating calories. Any diet will work if you just decrease the number of calories; everyone will find success in that. 

Intermittent fasting is beneficial, especially on nights. 

  • Working all night doesn’t mean you have to eat all night.
  • 16-8 is the one we usually do. We stop eating at midnight. 
  • Different associations with food. It becomes more of a fuel

Benefits of Intermittent fasting:

  1. Increases metabolism
  • In intermittent fasting, your metabolism does not decrease because fasting is short-term.
  • The way intermittent fasting indirectly boosts your metabolism is through norepinephrine. During acute starvation and short-term calorie negligence, your body increases norepinephrine levels. Norepinephrine causes an increase in the release of glucose. 

2. Immune function

  • Autophagy is the process of programmed cell death. It is also the ability to find damaged cells and destroy them.
  • On the immunological level, it is also breaking down white blood cells for resources to rebuild. White blood cells are a general term to associate all our immune cells. Our body naturally breaks down damaged cells and uses those components to create new mature white blood cells for the future.
  • Decreases oxidative stress and inflammation. Long-term effects of oxidation and inflammation increase the risks of developing cancer and other chronic diseases. A decrease in chronic disease, in turn, helps decrease the immune system’s workload.

3. Brain function

  • You take the work and time needed to consume food and put that effort into brain function and mental processing.
  • Increase a hormone called BDNF. Studies show that The chemical Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is decreased in depression and other brain issues. An increase in BDNF can make you feel better on a neurological level.
  • Builds self-control

4. Liquids 

  • You need to drink more water. This especially helps with hunger and craving. 

Food

Meat, including seafood – simple, protein keeps you fuller for longer. It’s the building block of life. 

  • Meat protein vs Plant-based
    • Research shows that meat protein 
      • Meat resulted in a more significant gain in whole-body net protein balance above baseline than the ounce equivalents of plant-based protein food sources. The improvement in whole-body net protein balance was due to increased protein synthesis with all the animal protein sources. In contrast, the egg and pork groups also suppressed protein breakdown compared to plant protein sources [1].
      • Steak, chicken, beef, pork, salmon, and shrimp. 

Fruits

    • Berries
      • Taste the best. Lower in calories and lower in carbs
  • Antioxidants
    • Help keep free radicals under control and helps decrease inflammation.
    • blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries have the highest antioxidant activity of commonly consumed fruits, next to pomegranates.

High in fiber

High nutrition content

      • Vitamins like C, minerals, Magnesium

Vegetables

  • The consistent vegetables we eat are mushrooms, potatoes (sweet and regular), onions, swiss chard, and greens.
  • Explore different vegetables and find ones you can consistently eat.
  • Basic building blocks for life. 
  • The primary source of all major vitamins and minerals for our body to function and present inflammation.

Greek yogurt and peanut butter

  • Unsweetened Greek yogurt with some fruits and granola
  • Great for gut support
      • Probiotics. Make sure it says Live and Active Cultures (LAC)
  • Bone and muscle health
      • Protein, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Oatmeal

    • Oatmeal with milk and butter, not water. 
    • Good source of fiber, protein, and antioxidants. 
  • Beta-glucans
    • Beta-glucans have been tested to lower blood glucose concentrations and decrease hyperlipidemia and hypertension [2].
    • It might prevent the body from absorbing cholesterol from food. They might also stimulate the immune system by increasing chemicals that prevent infections.
      • Essentially helps neutrophils travel to the site of infection faster and improves their potential to eliminate the bacteria they find there.

RX Bars

  • 3 eggwhites
  • 6 almonds 
  • 4 cashews
  • 2 Dates 

Recently – easy-to-eat salads with meat, romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, sprouts, avocado, and red onion. 

Primal Kitchen dressings – Cleanest dressing, based on olive and avocado oils. All are healthy foods that help nurses last their 12-hour shifts.

Learn what foods you can eat during your long shifts by watching the full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:44 Peters nightshift nurse life
03:42 Night shift eating pattern
06:44 What veggies and fruits for a nursing shift
10:09 Best protein powders
12:01 Water Intake as a nurse
16:21 Truth about dieting
17:34 Matt’s daily diet
19:55 Easy nursing snacks for nurses
24:05 How to prevent carb crashes and feeling tired
28:17 4 main food categories for good health
29:25 Avoid sugary foods at work
30:46 Caffeinate properly as a nurse
32:49 When do you get used to night shift?