Ep. 98: 6 Tips for Creating a Healthy Workplace Environment

Ep. 98: 6 Tips for Creating a Healthy Workplace Environment

6 Tips for Creating a Healthy Workplace Environment

A healthy workplace environment is possible, but it takes cooperation to do that. Our place of work should be something that we love going to. It should be a safe space where employees can communicate openly, discuss issues, and work together to keep the company moving. But sometimes, misunderstandings among coworkers or employers do happen. A toxic workplace can sometimes be unavoidable. It’s part of the work-life, but it doesn’t always have to be like that. 

Why a Healthy Workplace Environment is Essential

Keep in mind that the people you work with have different ideologies, points of view, and opinions. One way or another, someone will clash with somebody at work. But wouldn’t it be nice if we keep our work environment a healthy and happy place for everybody? 

As nurses, we have our fair share of ups and downs in our workplace. What makes a company a great place to work? It can be perks, locations, and incentives, but creating a healthy work environment will retain employees. And to do that, here are helpful tips that you can apply: 

Give your employees a real voice

  • Employers need to create a space where employees can express their feelings. After all, that’s how you identify pain points. Feedback is one of the most valuable tools you can get, to improve the workplace. There are tools such as annual surveys, but they don’t result in timely action. 
  • Feedback is excellent in real-time; that is why your charge or manager must have excellent leadership skills to honor your voiced opinion. Are there issues with other units or staff, and how are these problems addressed in real-time? 
  • There needs to be change implemented post feedback, just like in the surveys. If things continue, this leads to lower engagement, and ultimately your staff will fail to voice future concerns. 

Showing appreciation every day

  • When was the last time you got a shout-out from your manager when you least expected it? Sometimes those little words of affirmation can give you a big boost of confidence, instantly improving your mood. Recognition is essential to let employees know that their hard work is valued. 
  • Meaningful recognition can dramatically improve employee engagement, retention, and satisfaction. What is a simple way to show appreciation? Maybe something small like having a day off on your birthday. 

Create an environment of psychological safety and trust

  • Creating an environment of psychological safety is where employees are comfortable being themselves. When an employee feels safe, there is a sense of confidence that the team will not embarrass, reject or punish someone for speaking up. 
  • On the opposite spectrum, employees will be scared to speak up if they fear failure, judgment, or disrespect. 

Clean and functioning workspace 

  • Nothing makes life more complicated as a nurse than dealing with faulty equipment. Equipment includes things like computers, scanners, glucometers, suppliers, etc. Nothing grinds our gears more than not having the proper equipment to complete our tasks.
  • In every facility we worked at, this has been a reoccurring problem. It only added stress to the nurse who’s already dealing with patients’ lives. In the current facility we work in, we salute them for having proper lift equipment in every room.

Empowering your team members

  • This multifactorial approach requires managers, HR, and anyone else in the chain of command. No matter how capable your workforce is, they still need support to be their best selves at work. It is important to establish open feedback to show that your organization listens and encourages the team to keep voicing their wants and needs. 
  • Get to know your employees on a human level. Taking the time to do this will help uncover the best way to empower them and create an environment that makes them feel safe.
  • Empowering team members should also include building team-building skills. Often, nurses work individually within their role, but employers can encourage teamwork to make a better workspace environment. We all felt that unit where nurses and staff come to ask you if you need help with anything. 

Promote wellness through a healthy workplace environment

  • Wellness can be overlooked in the workplace, but psychological, emotional, and physical are essential to having a healthy workplace environment. Being a frontline health worker requires us to juggle between chill mode and fight-and-flight. The constant release of cortisol in stressful situations can inhibit rational and logical thinking.
  • A healthy workplace should encourage breaks for shifts and be mindful of workloads. Encouraging employees to rest is overlooked in most healthcare, but it’s crucial to take a break and boost energy to continue a busy shift. Randomly, imagine if a unit invests in apps like Headspace to help mitigate stress?

 

EP 163: Tips To Help You Survive Floating as a Nurse

EP 163: Tips To Help You Survive Floating as a Nurse

Tips To Help You Survive Floating as a Nurse

Survive floating as a nurse? It’s possible! You may have heard the term “floating” from nurses one way or another. While this term seems new, it has been used by many nurses in the unit before. So what is it? 

The term floating is used for a registered nurse who fills the short-staffed unit. They are also sometimes called float pool nurses and can be seen working in any area of a health care facility.

A floating nurse is the “reassignment of staff from one nursing unit to another, based upon the patient census and acuities.” They are an essential part of the healthcare staff and help to ensure that all areas are adequately staffed. 

Hospitals consider this a positive solution for saving money through resource utilization. It continues to be a staffing practice in health care facilities throughout the country. If you happen to be a floating nurse, this episode is for you. 

Today we will talk about how to survive floating as a nurse. It’s another day in the office when you walk into your unit, and you look at the assignment sheet and discover you have been assigned to float to another department. How you respond to this news can make or break the assignment.

How to Survive Floating as a Nurse

Not every nurse needs to float but there are many hospital positions that you can enter that allow you to float. Most of the time, floating nurses pay well. It is also a good reason why many nurses join the float pool. It is even better if you are a travel nurse.

Floating is challenging to get used to. Sometimes, a little bit impossible. It is because many nurses are unfamiliar with how things work in different units. The new environment can also be overwhelming. But the good news is that many nurses thrive in this position, no matter where they are.

In some cases, nurses choose to float because they like the idea of helping out units that need nurses the most.

1. Remain Calm

Why are you taking me off my unit? The first thing when you realize you’re floating usually your mood changes but don’t feel like to world is ending. Positivity and confidence are the keys. Go to the floating unit with a positive attitude to be welcoming to the new unit.

It makes such a difference when you ground yourself in positivity. Knowing no matter what happens, this shift will end and I will provide great patient care. This attitude will also set the mood for how your shift will go.

A lot of times floating nurses face unfamiliarity. This unfamiliarity may result in losing their confidence. Don’t forget you studied for over 4 years + to get your degree. Being in the position you’re in today, or the number of years of experience you have under your belt.

Start that positive self-talk with yourself. Remember, as a nurse you know what you have to do to take care of your patients. You’re good enough to be in the position that you’re in. Keeping calm and gathering your thoughts before working can also help.

2. Ask questions/learn the unit preferences

The best way to figure out the unit protocols or fit in is by asking what they do and why. After the huddle, go introduce yourself to the charge nurse.  Tell her you’re floating from another floor. If possible, ask if she can show you around the important thing you need to know about the unit. 

Remember, don’t hesitate or be afraid to ask questions. You have the whole shift to do that. Ask as many questions as you can so you are familiar with how the unit works.

  • Where is the medication room?
  • Do you have access to the pyxis?
  • Where is the supply room?
  • Are there standard charting or orders for this unit?
  • Where is the equipment room?
  • Where is the nutrition room?

Unit Routines

  • There might be different standing orders or charting protocol
  • Rhythm strips, pt weights
  • Specific handoff reports?
  • Specific medications to be signed off?
  • Accuchecks in the morning, are you covering the insulin

3. Speak up

No one knows if you don’t know something or if you’re struggling. Like any relationship communication is key. If you’re having a busy shift because you spent a lot of time getting yourself familiar with the unit, speak up. Make your needs known, most of the time everyone is helpful. 

When floating from the ICU: you can’t do everything for every patient

  • This isn’t the ICU, you can’t do everything
  • Importance of time management
  • Give recommendations but ultimately its the physician’s call

This is All a Learning Experience

In the younger nursing days, we pray not to get floated. We still to this day prefer to work in our home unit, but we have a positive outlook when it comes down to floating. Being challenged is a good thing, new experiences are what create growth. Don’t be stuck in your own bubble because you hinder your growth. 

 

EP 162: What’s In my Nurse Bag

EP 162: What’s In my Nurse Bag

What’s In my Nurse Bag?

What’s a nurse without their backpack? A lazy one, probably! But jokes aside, have you ever wondered what is inside a nurse’s bag? As a nurse, you have to be prepared all the time. Does this mean you have to pack your bag with nurse equipment? No, not really, but there are a few things you need to have in yours. 

In this episode, we will talk about the items that are in our nurse’s bags or backpacks. If you are a nursing student or new nurse, you are probably wondering what you will need in your work bag or backpack. Aside from your personal stuff, what are the things you bring with you? 

Items that are in our nurse backpacks: 

1. Stethoscope

This is one of the most important tools for the medical field. Nurses use this tool all the time to hear breath sounds, or heartbeats. It is also for nasogastric tube placement, equal breath sounds on intubation and the list goes on.

2. Writing items 

  • The 4-in-1 pen. Some nurses have a highlighter with them.
  • Penlight

We tend to always check pupils as part of our standard assessment. Some hospitals may provide flashlights in every room for your neuro checks.

3. Scissors and tape

Bandage scissors are for cutting dressings, bandages, and other things. Micropore tape is also essential. It should be available, for example, when your patient pulls his/her IV. If your whole unit is on isolation precautions then, there isn’t a need to carry your own tape.

4. Books

A handy reference guiding listening down common medicine, procedures, and conditions. Since we work in the ICU a reference book for critical care is what we like to carry. You’ll have patients you haven’t taken care of in a while. These could be patients on paralytics and you need to perform a train of four. This makes to look information up without panicking or needing to ask.

5. Nursing documents/folder

This includes report sheets that you use to take notes of patient care. While traveling nursing you may want to hold onto all documentation.

The nursing documents must be in a reliable folder. Place it in a folder where you can use it for writing on it while getting a report.

6. Liquids

Usually, we are fasting during our shift, so we ingest a lot of liquids. This includes water, tea, or coffee. Usually, nurses bring two beakers. One for water and the other with their personal choice liquid.

7. Lotion and Hand Sanitizer

As nurses, we wash our hands so it’s important to prevent your skin from going dry, especially in the wintertime. Having to sanitize while having cracked hands isn’t painless, burn baby burn. Sanitizers help nurses steer clear of germs, along with other contagious agents.

8. Hair mask/bandanna

This is something we started to include during the pandemic of 2020. Since we have beards, we use PAPR’s to get into isolation rooms, the bandanna protects your hair and keeps it clean.

9. Charger and electronic accessories

Nowadays we always have the need to connect to the internet. If you’re working the night shift you listen to podcasts while charting on headphones.

10. Eye drops

The hospital always has low humidity for infection prevention measures. So having dry eyes can be a common thing. If you wear contacts during work your eyes may tend to dry up even more often.

11. Chapsticks

No one likes chapped lips, chap up! Little humidity air causes chapped lips. Another common cause of chapped lips is habitual licking. Lips don’t contain oil glands like other parts of the skin.

12. Planner/Journal

When there are a few minutes of downtime, it’s always good to plan out your schedule. This can also include taking out a journal and writing your thoughts down.

13. Miscellaneous

These miscellaneous items are not really as important as the ones listed above. However, they might come in handy at certain times. So, it’s better to have them ready in our bags in case we need to use them:

  • Protective eyewear
  • Loose bags of tea
  • Tylenol or ibuprofen
  • Alcohol pads
  • Light jacket

 

 

 

EP 161: The Basics Every Nurse Should Know

EP 161: The Basics Every Nurse Should Know

The Basics Every Nurse Should Know

There are three basics every nurse should know by heart. You must understand that being a nurse comes with significant responsibilities. It’s like being a superhero, but your powers are stripped off when you make a mistake! You can say goodbye to your career and beloved profession if that is the case. 

Because medical errors are common these days, you must know all the nursing basics. Knowing all the basic procedures, SOPs, etc., will save your patient and your license as a nurse. 

As a nurse, you have to perform your job to the best of your abilities. It will also help you if you can memorize all the nursing basics there is to know so you can also serve your patients better. 

Keep in mind that there are many work-related basics that every nurse should know. These are all essential in making your job more effective. Nursing is composed of many different units and fields, each requiring its level of competence. Here’s what you need to know:

Basics Every Nurse Should Know About

 

1. Medications

Not every nurse works in the ER or ICU.  But there are specific medications that are often shared amongst most if not all units. Over the course of your work, you will get used to your unit’s medications. Those are unit-specific, but there are also medications that you’ll be familiar with.

Some of these are emergency medications and are often used as a quick solution to acute issues. The meds we’d like to address are more for emergent use and used as problem solvers. Medications like levothyroxine or pancrelipase are essential. But those are more unit-based. These are usually given the next day. We want to focus on meds that can benefit nurses in stressful situations.

  • Pressors

Vasopressors are among the common medications you’ll see in the ER or ICU. But if you don’t work in these units, you might think you’ll never use them.

Before you call that rapid or even during a rapid there are things you can do. If the patient is hypotensive there are 2 major things you can do; give fluid and/or start levophed. For patients with low blood pressure, norepinephrine is a good backup med. Levophed, Levo, norepi, and norepinephrine all mean the same thing.

You don’t have to memorize all vasopressors. Remember only the basic medications used like levophed. It is usually the first line of meds used in emergencies.

  • Antihypertensives

There are many ways to lower blood pressure and many meds. The most common ones we’ve seen are Nicardipine, metoprolol, and hydralazine. Each works differently but has the same functional effect on lowering blood pressure. 

  • Beta-blockers like metoprolol tartrate (Lopressor) or metoprolol succinate

Metoprolol tartrate is also referred to as Lopressor. It’s different than succinate because Lopressor wors quicker but not as long. We use Lopressor to bring down a patient’s blood pressure quickly. Metoprolol succinate is a common med prescribed outside the hospital because it can be taken once or twice a day vs. 4-6 times.

Keep in mind that this is a beta-blocker, which lowers blood pressure and heart rate. You’ll need to find a delicate balance in the amount of med to give for that reason, you need blood pressure control, but you can only give them so much before you throw them into heart block and need to pace them.

  • Vasodilators like hydralazine

Hydralazine is one of the main antihypertensives used in heart failure. It is an interesting medication because it primarily affects the arteries causing decreased peripheral resistance; reduced blood pressure; and reflexively increased heart rate, stroke volume, and CO.

The main contraindication is coronary artery disease because increased cardiac output increases cardiac work and may provoke angina and myocardial ischemia or infarction.

  • Calcium channel blockers like nicardipine

Calcium channel blockers are medications used to lower blood pressure. They work by preventing calcium from entering the cells of the heart and arteries. 

It also causes the heart and arteries to squeeze vigorously (contract). By blocking calcium, calcium channel blockers allow blood vessels to relax and open.

Nicardipine is given intravenously. Sometimes, patients with a stroke get placed on it for strict blood pressure management. It is a titratable drug. 

  • Insulin

So many different insulins. You don’t have to remember the exact hourly effect or half-life, just the basics. Lantus or glargine is long-acting. You’ll give it once a day, twice tops. 

NPH: this is the insulin you will give with meals. Regular is usually used for coverage.

 

2. Report

Each unit is going to have its own specific things they like in the report. For example, a cardiac ICU nurse gets more information about the heart. In the report, they write about the cardiac index, output, and pulmonary artery pressures. 

Regardless of what unit you are in, you need to know the basic information that is standard for each report. If by chance you are new, floating, or a travel nurse, your report improves over time. But, you will always be in the clear if you know the core basics. These are:

  • Room, name, age, code status, and allergies
  • Past medical history, contact info
  • Admission day, why they came in, and events during hospital stay/shift.
  • Planned procedures, able to DC or transfer, patient plan.
  • Neuro: Mentation, commands, fever, activity, RASS
  • Card: HR/rhythm, BP, pulses, and meds
  • Resp: O2, trach/ET size, tubes, vent settings, ABG, and lung sounds
  • GI/GU: Drains/tubes (NG, PEG, ostomy, etc..), output, last BM, and diet
  • Skin
  • Lines
  • Drips and important meds
  • Labs

 

3. Emergency basics every nurse should know

Not all floor requires ACLS, but BLS is a standard in the hospital. You should also know what to do in certain situations. Even though you may not perform all tasks during an emergency, it is always a good thing that you know what to do. 

Having a basic understanding during an emergency situation is essential. It is also good to know some of the algorithms, so you have an understanding of what to do in case of emergencies. 

 

  • Assess your patient, what has changed? Are they hard to arouse? Breathing? Pulse? 
  • ACLS
  • Bradycardia protocol 
  • Tachycardia with pulse
Ep. 97: The Top Five Personality Traits

Ep. 97: The Top Five Personality Traits

The Top Five Personality Traits

There are five personality traits that we all have in common. Even though every one of us is different, ranging from our personality to our physical appearance, psychologists and psychoanalysts have been trying to predict behaviors and thought processes. 

Body Types

Look at the friends around you. Do you share any personality traits with them? When you think about it, we are not entirely nonidentical. Even though drastically different from one another, humans do have many similarities. On the physical level, when it comes to body type, the majority, if not all, fit into three main body types:

  • Endomorph
  • Mesomorph
  • Ectomorph

Each body type has its strengths and weaknesses. In the same way, there are general body types. We all share certain personality traits, for example, agreeableness. We are all agreeable but to a certain point. Some might be very agreeable and are ready to say yes, while others are less agreeable and will need some convincing to take your side. 

Background on the Top Five Personality Traits

Initially developed in 1949, the big five personality traits is a theory established by D. W. Fiske and later expanded upon by other researchers, including Norman (1967), Smith (1967), Goldberg (1981), and McCrae & Costa (1987).

It’s suggested that as early as the late 19th-century, social psychologists were trying to gain a more scientific understanding of personality. However, it wasn’t until the first official study in the 1930s by Gordon Allport and Henry Odbert that personality had some scientific acknowledgment [1].

They took 18,000 words from Webster’s Dictionary to describe personality traits and found adjectives that described non-physical characteristics creating a 4500-word bank of visual behavior markers. 

There was a hiatus from the late 1960s to the 1970s; the changing zeitgeist made publishing personality research difficult. In his 1968 book Personality and Assessment, Walter Mischel asserted that personality instruments could not predict behavior with a correlation of more than 0.3.

Social psychologists like Mischel argued that attitudes and behavior were not stable but varied with the situation. Indication of behavior from personality instruments claimed to be impossible.

The Paradigm of the Five Personality Traits

The paradigm shifted back to accepting the five-factor model in the early 1980s. During a 1980 symposium in Honolulu, four prominent researchers, Lewis Goldberg, Naomi Takemoto-Chock, Andrew Comrey, and John M. Digman, reviewed the available personality instruments of the day. This event was followed by widespread acceptance of the five-factor model among personality researchers during the 1980s.

By 1983, experiments had demonstrated that the predictions of personality models correlated better with real-life behavior under stressful, emotional conditions, as opposed to typical survey administration under neutral emotional conditions. 

Emerging methodologies increasingly confirmed personality theories during the 1980s. Though generally failing to predict single instances of behavior. Researchers found that they could predict behavior patterns by aggregating large numbers of observations. As a result, correlations between personality and behavior increased substantially, and it was clear that “personality” did exist.

Personality and social psychologists now generally agree that personal and situational variables are needed to account for human behavior.

In 2007, Colin G. DeYoung, Lena C. Quilty, and Jordan B. Peterson concluded that the ten aspects of the Big Five might have distinct biological substrates.

The FFM-associated (five factors model of personality) test was used by Cambridge Analytica and was part of the “psychographic profiling” controversy during the 2016 US presidential election.

The Big Five Personality Traits

Although a person’s personality and behavior are hard to predict, there are specific tools that we can use that can provide insights into it. These tools help us understand others and ourselves better.

The five personality traits are broad, but they will give us a good general understanding of how people behave [2]. So, what are these traits? 

1. Openness

By openness, it means open to experiencing a general appreciation for art, adventure, unusual ideas, imagination, curiosity, emotion, and various experiences. People who are available to new experiences are often intellectually curious, sensitive to beauty, open to feelings, and willing to try new things.

These individuals are known to be creative and aware of their emotions. They are also most likely to have unconventional beliefs. And because they are open to these new things, they are often unpredictable. They also lack the focus they need sometimes and are most likely to engage in behaviors that are against the norms. 

The Risk-taker Among Five Personality Traits

Very open people often pursue self-actualization by seeking out euphoric experiences. Conversely, those with low openness seek to gain fulfillment through perseverance and are characterized as pragmatic and data-driven, maybe even close-minded and dogmatic. 

*Some disagreement remains about interpreting and contextualizing the openness factor as there is a lack of biological support for this particular trait. Openness has not shown a significant association with any brain regions as opposed to the other four attributes, which did when using brain imaging to detect changes in volume associated with each trait.*

Creativity also plays a big part in the openness trait; this leads to a more significant comfort zone in abstract and lateral thinking.

It includes the ability to “think outside of the box.”

Think of that person who’s always ordering the most exotic things on the menu, going to different places, and having interests you would never have thought of. That is someone who has a high openness trait.

People who are high in this trait tend to be more adventurous and creative. People low in this trait are often more traditional and may struggle with abstract thinking.

High

  • Very creative
  • Open to trying new things
  • Focused on tackling new challenges
  • Happy to think about abstract concepts
  • Curious
  • Imaginative
  • Unconventional
Low

  • Dislikes change
  • Does not enjoy new things
  • Resists new ideas
  • Not very imaginative
  • Dislikes abstract or theoretical concepts
  • Predictable
  • Prefer routine
  • Traditional

 

2. Conscientiousness 

Conscientiousness tends to display self-discipline, act dutifully, and strive for achievement against measures or outside expectations. It is related to how people control, regulate, and direct their impulses. 

A person with high conscientiousness is perceived to be stubborn and focused. Those who have high scores on conscientiousness are usually people who do not go without plans. They prefer a reliable method rather than spontaneous behaviors. 

The Planner Among Five Personality Traits

The best example of a person with this personality trait is when someone you know likes to plan ahead of time the next time you meet. They also keep in contact and check on your wellbeing. People with this trait often want to organize their dates and events. They are also focused on you when you do meet them in person. 

On the other hand, those with low conscientiousness are associated with flexibility and spontaneity but can also appear sloppy and lack reliability.

People low in conscientiousness tend to dislike structure and schedules, procrastinate on essential tasks and fail to complete tasks.

The average level of conscientiousness rises among young adults and then declines among older adults.

 

High

  • Spends time preparing
  • Finishes important tasks right away
  • Pays attention to detail
  • Enjoys having a set schedule
  • Competence
  • Organized
  • Dutifulness
  • Achievement striving
  • Self-disciplined
  • Deliberation
Low

  • Dislikes structure and schedules
  • Makes messes and doesn’t take care of things
  • Fails to return things or put them back where they belong
  • Procrastinates important tasks
  • Fails to complete necessary or assigned tasks
  • Incompetent
  • Disorganized
  • Careless
  • Indiscipline
  • Impulsive

 

3. Extraversion

Extraversion is a trait that many people will have come across in their own lives. It’s easily identifiable and widely recognizable as “someone who gets energized in the company of others.” The other traits of a person with extraversion include:

  • Talkativeness
  • Assertiveness
  • High levels of emotional expressiveness

All of which made them recognizable in many social interactions or settings. Have you noticed among your family members that there is always someone who is not afraid to express their feelings? They’re often loud and one who laughs the most audible among others. These people are also social butterflies and have the most friends or groups you know. 

Extraversion is characterized by breadth of activities (instead of depth), surgency from external activity/situations, and energy creation from the external environment. The trait is marked by pronounced engagement with the outer world. 

The Energetic Among Five Personality Traits

Extraverts enjoy interacting with people and are often perceived as full of energy. They tend to be enthusiastic, action-oriented individuals. They possess high group visibility, like talking and asserting themselves. Extraverted people may appear more dominant in social settings than introverted people in this setting.

On the other hand, introverts have lower social engagement and energy levels than extroverts. They tend to seem quiet, low-key, deliberate, and less involved in the social world. However, do not mistake their social involvement as shyness or depression. They are more independent of their social world than extroverts. 

Introverts need less stimulation and more time alone than extroverts. But this does not mean that they are unfriendly or antisocial; instead, they are reserved in social situations. Generally, people are a combination of extraversion and introversion.

High

  • Enjoys being the center of attention
  • Likes to start conversations
  • Enjoys meeting new people
  • Has a wide social circle of friends and acquaintances
  • Finds it easy to make new friends
  • Feels energized when around other people
  • Say things before thinking about them
  • Sociable
  • Excitement-seeking
  • Outgoing
Low

  • Prefers solitude
  • Feels exhausted when having to socialize a lot
  • Finds it difficult to start conversations
  • Dislikes making small talk
  • Carefully thinks things through before speaking
  • Dislikes being the center of attention
  • Reflective

4. Agreeableness

Being agreeable or agreeableness refers to how people treat their relationships with others. Compared to extraversion, who like to pursue relationships, agreeable people focus on their interaction and orientation with others. 

The agreeableness trait also reflects individual differences in general concern for social harmony. Agreeable individuals value getting along with others. They are generally considerate, kind, generous, trusting and trustworthy, helpful, and willing to compromise their interests with others. Agreeable people also have an optimistic view of human nature.

Disagreeable individuals place self-interest above getting along with others. They are generally unconcerned with others’ well-being and are less likely to extend themselves to others. 

Sometimes their skepticism about others’ motives causes them to be suspicious, unfriendly, and uncooperative. Low agreeable personalities are often competitive or challenging individuals who can be argumentative or untrustworthy.

Since agreeableness is a social trait, research shows that this positively correlates with the quality of relationships with their team members. Agreeableness also positively predicts transformational leadership skills. 

The Strongest Among Five Personality Traits

In a study conducted on 169 participants in leadership positions in various professions. These individuals were asked to take a personality test and have two evaluations completed by directly supervised subordinates. The results showed that leaders with high levels of agreeableness were most likely considered transformational rather than transactional. 

Although the relationship was not strong, it was the strongest of the five personality traits. However, the same study showed no predictive power of leadership effectiveness as evaluated by the leader’s direct supervisor.

Conversely, agreeableness is negatively related to transactional leadership in the military. A study of Asian military units showed leaders with high agreeableness are more likely to receive a low rating for transformational leadership skills.

Agreeable people tend to find careers in areas where they can help the most. Charity workers, medicine, mental health, and even those who volunteer in soup kitchens and dedicate time to the third sector (social studies) are high in the agreeableness chart.

High

  • Has a great deal of interest in other people
  • Cares about others
  • Feels empathy and concern for other people
  • Enjoys helping and contributing to the happiness of other people
  • Assists others who are in need of help
  • Trust (forgiving)
  • Straightforwardness
  • Altruism (enjoys helping)
  • Compliance
  • Modesty
  • Sympathetic
Low

  • Takes little interest in others
  • Doesn’t care about how other people feel
  • Has little interest in other people’s problems
  • Insults and belittles others
  • Manipulates others to get what they want
  • Skeptical
  • Demanding
  • Stubborn
  • Show-off
  • Unsympathetic

5. Neuroticism

Neuroticism is characterized by sadness, moodiness, and emotional instability. Often mistaken for anti-social behavior, or worse, a more significant psychological issue, neuroticism is a physical and emotional response to stress and perceived threats in someone’s daily life.

Individuals who exhibit high levels of neuroticism tend to experience mood swings, anxiety, and irritability. Some individuals who share sudden changes in character from a day-to-day perspective could be highly neurotic and respond to high-stress levels in their work and personal lives. 

Anxiety, which plays a large part in the makeup of neuroticism, is about an individual’s ability to cope with stress and perceived or actual risk. People who suffer from neuroticism will overthink many situations and find difficulty in relaxing even in their own space.

The Skeptic Among Five Personality Traits

These problems in emotional regulation can diminish the ability of a person scoring high on neuroticism to think, make decisions, and cope effectively with stress. Lacking contentment in one’s life achievements can correlate with high neuroticism scores and increase one’s likelihood of falling into clinical depression. 

Individuals with high neuroticism also tend to experience more negative things in life. However, this also changes in response to their positive and negative life experiences. 

Of course, those who rank lower on the neurotic level will exhibit a more stable and emotionally resilient attitude to stress and situations. Low neurotic sufferers also rarely feel sad or depressed, taking the time to focus on the present moment and not get involved in mental arithmetic on possible stress-inducing factors.

High

  • Experiences a lot of stress
  • Worries about many different things
  • Gets upset easily
  • Experiences dramatic shifts in mood
  • Feels anxious
  • Struggles to bounce back after stressful events
  • Angry hostility (irritable)
  • Self-consciousness (shy)
  • Vulnerability
Low

  • Emotionally stable
  • Deals well with stress
  • Rarely feels sad or depressed
  • Don’t worry much
  • Is very relaxed
  • Calm
  • Confident
  • Resilient

 

The Five Personalities Traits and Their Influence

From nature and nurture to age and maturation, the big five personality traits have been widely studied where we can see what influences their impact on a person’s behavior and character. 

Personality has often been hypothesized as a question of nurture or nature. One particular study looked at 123 identical twins and 127 pairs of fraternal twins. The results suggested that the heritability for each trait is:

  • 53% for extraversion
  • 41% for agreeableness
  • 44% for conscientiousness
  • 41% for neuroticism
  • 61% for openness

It has also been widely recognized that the older we get, the more our behavior traits will change. We become less neurotic, extraverted, and less open to new experiences as we age. However, our agreeableness and conscientiousness grow as we get older. 

Five Personality Traits: Men vs women

The consensus is that men and women are more alike than what normative social science would have us believe. But as the title would suggest, there are some exceptions. 

Weinsberg and DeYoung 2011 studied the big five traits and, in particular, Gender Differences in Personality across the Ten Aspects of the Big Five. They concluded that women tend to score higher on Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism than men. 

Other studies have concluded that while the differences may be present, some traits are not extensively separate. Getting older will tend to align behavior traits such as agreeableness and extraversion, where both genders tend to score lower as time moves on.

To know more about Episode 97, click here 👇:

TIMESTAMPS: 

00:00 Intro
00:46 Plugs
02:07 Episode Introduction
03:55 Background on the Big Five Personality Traits
10:04 Big Personality Traits: Openness
15:04 Big Personality Traits: Conscientiousness
18:01 Big Personality Traits: Extraversion
21:50 Big Personality Traits: Agreeableness
27:34 Big Personality Traits: Neuroticism
31:18 Big 5 and its Influence
36:19 How the 5 personality traits play role in gender
40:25 Wrapping up the episode