7 Tips on How to Handle Difficult Patients

7 Tips on How to Handle Difficult Patients

7 Tips on How to Handle Difficult Patients

Working as a nurse means you deal with all kinds of patients, and yes, even the rude ones. That said, you must know how to handle difficult patients if you wish to become an effective nurse. 

Why are some patients rude?

Several factors make a patient hard to handle. It could be due to the stress of the illness or the tensions they feel from being inside a hospital. Sometimes, a patient can be distressed, angry, scared, demanding, or have unrealistic treatment expectations for their needs. However, some of these behaviors may also be due to their past experiences in terms of medical treatment. 

How to Handle Difficult Patients

As a nurse, you cannot avoid patients that can test your nerves. However, you can also find ways to deal with them. Here’s how:

Tip 1. Don’t fight fire with fire.

One of the first things you must understand is that patients are sick and need your help, not the other way around. As a healthcare professional, you must try not to respond in anger. A patient’s offense may not originate from when they were at the hospital but perhaps triggered by something that might have happened in their life. Try to be as patient and understanding as you can. Showing respect is still the right thing to do. 

Tip 2. Listen to them.

Sometimes, an angry patient will tell their story once they have calmed down. When they do, give them undivided attention and listen to what they are talking about. Be sure to collect your thoughts before speaking to them too. Address them by their first name, acknowledge their concern, talk slowly and maintain eye contact when talking to them. Avoid mirroring their words; this could trigger them and may even turn defensive again. 

Tip 3. Take note of your body language.

Sometimes, actions speak louder than words. That said, be mindful of your body language when you are dealing with a difficult patient [1]. When a patient is angry, they will find a way to push your buttons too. In return, you become mad yourself. Being mindful about how you react is crucial. It will also help you choose the right words to say, use the tone of your voice, body language, and overall response. 

Tip 4. Acknowledge the situation at hand. 

Learn to acknowledge the situation. Most importantly, recognize how your patient feels. You can start by saying, “I understand how you feel” or “I feel like we have a misunderstanding.” As you do, be sure to keep your feelings aside and stay calm. Avoid using negative words that could escalate the situation. 

Tip 5. Setting the boundaries. 

Patients go to the hospital because they need attention, no doubt about that. However, if you keep giving in to their demands, how can you give attention to your other patients? Be clear with your boundaries. Make sure to set a time limit, say 15 minutes, then tell them you will see them in the next 30. Inform them as well that you are working on the patient ratio, and you are doing your best to help them out. As you continue to practice this with them, they will soon realize that you have a busy schedule and empathize with your situation. 

Tip 6. Provide a Patient’s Satisfaction Survey

This survey will allow your patients to share any of their concerns [2]. Tell them that you value their feedback seriously. It also prevents them from leaving bad reviews online. 

Tip 7. Stay proactive.

There is no use ignoring the problem. Avoiding a problematic patient won’t work either. So stay proactive, acknowledge your patient’s situation, identify the source of their anger, and be sure to implement steps to de-escalate the problem. The more you understand the case, the better it is for you to understand the case and learn how to handle difficult patients. 

Your Takeaway

There will always be unruly patients wherever you go. They will come to you with various ailments, mood disorders, fears, and a mountain of other complications. You must also understand that they come from diverse backgrounds and live different lifestyles that you may disagree with. But it is part of the job, after all. As a nurse, stay professional; you were trained in this field, so use your nursing knowledge and abilities to provide them with the quality care they deserve. 

 

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

How Nurses Cope with the Death of a Patient: 7 Ways to Do it

We all die in the end. It sounds morbid, but this is the reality and commonality for us all. For nurses, dealing with a patient’s death can be traumatic in some ways. How do nurses cope with the death of a patient anyway? 

How to Cope with the Death of a Patient

If you are a new nurse and have just experienced the death of a patient, it can be overwhelming. It is not always easy to deal with it. And just because you are a nurse, that does not mean you are immune to grieving. Truth is, it is part of the challenges nurses face. We do grieve for our patients, and we do these seven steps to help us cope with the loss. 

1. Understand that Death is Inevitable.

When you understand that life is a cycle, it is easier to cope with all the stress. We all are bound to die at some point, and while death can’t be avoided, you should accept that this is part of life. Of course, accepting it does not mean you are someone who doesn’t feel anything. You do, but you understand better, and as a nurse, it is part of your understanding that all life comes to an end. 

2. It is part of your job. 

As a nurse, dealing with loss is a daily part of your life. Showing empathy toward your patients is what makes you an excellent nurse, but it can also be painful when you lose a patient. You also mourn the loss whenever you lose a patient, and sometimes, longer than you thought you could. Death becomes personal for nurses with empathy, but they must also remember that it is part of their chosen profession. And as a nurse yourself, you must realize that your profession deals with caring for people, and grieving for your patients means you have done your job. 

3. Talking about it helps.

Being in the healthcare field means you are often surrounded by the sick and dying. Fortunately, you have coworkers and colleagues who have dealt with the same situation before. Whatever you are feeling, they have experienced it too. Processing your emotions out loud to another empathetic nurse can help you with that. Colleagues who have dealt with patient death can often relate to how you feel and may even advise you on what to do.

4. It’s OK to feel how you feel.

Sometimes, as healthcare providers, we often rationalize how we feel about the death of a patient. While this can sometimes help, this is not realistic. Of course, you have to remain as professional as you can be after losing a patient, but you can also feel sad about it. Understand that death is a tricky thing, but you are also entitled to feel how you feel. You can grieve for your patients in your way as long as it doesn’t affect your work. 

5. Take care of yourself.

As nurses, we often form a close bond with our patients. And when we lose that patient, we often find ourselves grieving for them like family. How nurses cope with the death of a patient can sometimes be more personal than anything. However, in the aftermath of this, you need to take care of yourself. Remember, your job as a nurse means taking care of patients. That said, you must also take care of yourself by getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising regularly. 

6. Remember, you are making a big difference.

Part of a nurse’s job is to not only care for patients but their families as well. The loss of a patient can affect family members the most, and as a nurse, you have the opportunity to be there for them too. How you treat family members who suffer and talk to them can make a huge difference in their lives. It can also help them cope with the loss. So, in your little way, you helped them. 

7. Find an outlet to destress. 

Dealing with patient loss is no doubt stressful. How nurses cope with the death of a patient can sometimes be done creatively. If you are a creative nurse, finding an outlet to express your emotions can help you in a big way. You can try crafting, arts or painting, joining an art club, or anything creative. Nurses need a break, too, significantly when they are affected deeply by the death of a patient. Pent-up emotions can be deadly, so finding an outlet to destress helps. 

Your Takeaway

We all deal with death and dying differently. Choosing the path of being a professional nurse means you will be exposed to death more often than you think, so be ready for such cases. Remember that death does not mean you failed as a nurse, nor does it signify the end of patient care. 

Your life and job as a nurse are bittersweet – there will always be ups and downs. Always remember that the way you cared for and loved your patients will be remembered by those around them, so keep doing your best! 

 

6 Stress Relieving Tips for Nurses 

6 Stress Relieving Tips for Nurses 

6 Stress Relieving Tips for Nurses 

Being a nurse is a stressful job, and it’s not even a joke! Knowing different kinds of stress-relieving tips can help nurses from all walks of life. 

Why are Nurses Stressed?

As a nurse, your life is extra busy most of the time. As a nurse, the most helpful way to combat stress is to understand what stresses you out. It is not always easy to identify stressors but we can help you narrow it down, here are the most common causes of stress for nurses:

Constant use of critical thinking  skills 

Being a nurse you are always critically thinking, either how medication can impact a patient or when a family member has a difficult question. it can be a mentally draining job. A nurse’s job is demanding, and you do not always have the time to check out even if you want to.

Work environment demands 

There will be constant pacing while working with doctors and other healthcare providers when you are at work. It is common to clash with coworkers and patients at times or have miscommunication, leading to pressure and stress. 

A 12+ hour job

Long shifts can be exhausting, and nurses often work insanely long shifts. Many nurses work 12+ hours a day any extra overtime leads to increased stress and a drain on energy.  So it is prevalent among nurses to be a little cranky after each shift as it can be physically, emotionally and mentally draining, especially on the night shift. 

An emotional job

When you look at it, a nurse’s job is to take care of the sick and dying. But while they are caring for sick people, they also take care of the families left worrying or grieving. It can put an emotional strain on nurses and also be stressful on their part. In addition to that, some families can be challenging to deal with. While nurses are empathetic, coping with demanding families adds pressure to their jobs. 

The Pandemic

We were not prepared for the pandemic, and among healthcare providers, nurses are the most affected. Their responsibilities did not only double but also folded twice. They deal with the increased workload a pandemic brings while also putting their health on the line. Some are even assigned to do a job they were not adequately trained for to meet the nursing demands. Because of this, saying a nurse is stressed is underrated. 

Helpful and Stress Relieving Tips You Can Apply

So, what can you do to release the stress you feel each time you are under pressure at work? Knowing different stress-relieving techniques can help nurses big time. Here are a few:

Find a nursing path that you love

Are you stuck in a nursing job that you don’t like? Or are you looking for an option to do something else? If you answered yes to either, it’s time to move on to a different path in nursing. Keep in mind that nursing is an ever-dynamic field, so there is always something to do. If you love traveling, become a travel nurse, and if you enjoyed your time in the Operating Room as a student nurse, pursue a career in OR nursing. Maybe you are done with acute care and want to settle down in an outpatient clinic. The options are endless. Just make sure that the path you selected is something you would like to do for the long haul. 

Remind yourself why you became a nurse

Earning a high salary is one of the benefits nursing brings, but is it all you want? When things get tough, ask yourself why you became a nurse. Is it because you love helping others? Was it a good route for financial security?? – Whatever your reasons are, going back to the reason why you became a nurse will shed light on your darkest hours. So, whenever you feel stressed, use that reason to get back on your feet!

Sweat it out!

Another good way to relieve stress is through exercise. Many nurses find themselves sweating their stress out in the gym more often these days, so why not do the same? If you don’t like the confines of the gym, you can always work out at home. You can follow exercise apps or YouTube videos and burn those calories of frustration! Not only will you feel good, but you will also feel energized again, improve your health, and be pumped for your next shift.

Eat Healthily

Since we are talking about exercise, you might as well include your diet. To stabilize your energy, pair your workout with a balanced meal. Your diet must consist of energy-giving foods to keep you on your feet all the time. Eating green leafy vegetables, fruits, juices, and superfoods like nuts, avocadoes, sardines, berries, etc., must be included in your daily meals. These will keep you healthy and help reduce the stress and anxiety that you may feel at work. 

Practice meditation and breathing exercises.

Besides doing your workout routines, you must also practice breathing exercises and meditation. When things get crazy, pause, meditate and be mindful of your breathing. You don’t have to bring a yoga mat! Breathing techniques can be done anywhere, even at work. So, plan out your day, and take time to meditate, and refocus. It will help you get through even the most toxic shifts! 

Don’t forget to take time off.

All work and no play make you a dull person. So, relax, take time off and socialize. As much as you want to sleep on your day-offs, set time to socialize with friends or family. It is always good to have an outlet and to be yourself without worrying about the next patient chart you need to update. You don’t have to work all the time, find balance, and learn to live a stress-free life as a nurse. 

Your takeaway

As a nurse, facing stressful situations at work is a given. It is part of the profession. It is why you must find ways to destress. Don’t let the daily chaos of nurse life ruin your determination to help others. Try and see how these stress-relieving tips for nurses can help you. 

 

Your First Year as a Nurse: Advice for New Nurses

Your First Year as a Nurse: Advice for New Nurses

Your First Year as a Nurse: Advice for New Nurses

Congratulations on passing nursing school and making it into the nursing world! You are now a qualified and registered nurse, so how can you survive your first year as a nurse? Here’s what you need to know.

On Your First Year as a Nurse

Working as a professional nurse is an exciting and scary thought. You are new to the job, but at the same time, you have the skills needed to do it. Your first year as a nurse is a year for adjustments, and I will be honest with you, it will be difficult. It’s like everything you learned in nursing school is poking you all at once! You will discover different skills and techniques used in the trade, AND you will probably be tired all the time. Long shifts, overtime, and toxic days are ahead of you. But, don’t worry, if anyone before you made it, so can you! Following these pieces of advice will help you survive and thrive in this wonderful career.

It’s OK not to know everything

One of the anxieties that new nurses experience is that they expect to be good at what they do right away. You are not going to master every technique, procedure, or hospital protocol in one year. Give yourself some time to adjust to your new environment. Remember, your first year is a year for adjustments, so give yourself some room to learn. Bear in mind that your new domain is different from nursing school, so relax. It is OK not to know everything. I know you want to be good at your job, but take one step at a time. After all, being a nurse is a job that requires patience, so be patient with yourself. 

Don’t be afraid to ask questions

As a nurse, you must have a curious nature. If you don’t understand something, ask questions. Many new nurses are afraid to ask questions because it may sound like they admit to something they don’t know. However, asking questions is also an excellent way to learn. So, don’t hesitate to ask questions. It will show that you are interested in learning something new and that you are open to new things and not afraid to speak up. 

Develop your time management skills

One of the skills you must develop during your first year as a nurse is time management. Keep in mind that your priority is patient care, but as you do, you also need to meet the hospital management’s expectations and coworkers. Learning how to use your time effectively can help you in this situation. 

Get to know who you are working with

Remember your coworkers’ names, and make sure to say hello when you meet them in corridors. As a new nurse, it is essential to make friends and build relations with your colleagues. So, be polite and cooperate with your coworkers. Seek advice from your mentors and colleagues. Not only is this important in your profession, but it will also help in surviving your first year as a nurse. Besides, wouldn’t it be nice to have someone you can trust and laugh with on your team when things get tough? Of course!

Sign up in classes or volunteer to enhance your nursing skills

Your life as a nurse does not only revolve around the hospital. During your first year, be sure to sign up for additional classes to enhance your nursing skills. Volunteering for events, internships, and nursing drives also enhances your nursing knowledge. It will hone your skills and prepare you for your career as a full-pledge nurse. 

Join nursing organizations 

Becoming a member of nursing organizations is beneficial on your part as a new nurse. Being a part of these networks broadens your opportunity to find work and resources. It is also an excellent way to make connections in the professional nursing world. If you decide to join a nursing organization, make sure that it is close to the chosen area of the nursing field you would like to work. For example, if you wish to be a part of psychiatric-mental health nursing, you can join the American Psychiatric Nurses Association. 

Prioritize self-care for you. 

Many new nurses experience anxiety and stress during their first year as a nurse. That said, it is crucial to take care of your mental health too. As a nurse, you are the health care provider, but what happens when you are not well yourself? How can you deliver quality care to your patients? So, take care of yourself; exercise, meditate, eat healthily, and get enough rest. Not only are you taking care of yourself and your mental health, but it will also help you from burning out. 

The Reality of Your First Year as a Nurse

It will be challenging, but it will also be one of the best years of your life! As a new nurse, you are like an infant. You may have a license to work as a nurse and the knowledge to apply, but just like a growing baby, you also need to take small steps. 

Of course, there will be days when everything else is extra tricky, but don’t give up! Stay positive, and instead of feeling down, list the things you don’t know of and see what you can do to correct them. Read new nursing trends, be updated with the latest in the nursing community, build relationships in and out of your workplace – anything is possible! Yes, your first year will be tough, but if you focus on the good things, your time will fly by, and the next thing you know, you’re on your way to better opportunities. So, enjoy the experience, and most importantly, enjoy the opportunity of helping others. Good luck!

 

You Failed NCLEX Exams: What to Do Next?

You Failed NCLEX Exams: What to Do Next?

You Failed NCLEX Exams: What to Do Next?

So, you studied hard, took the NCLEX exams, and waited in agony for the results, only to find out that you failed the NCLEX. What a disappointing outcome. By now, you feel like breaking down because of this result, but before you do, wipe your tears, hold your head up high, and retake the exams. But how can you retake this test? What is the next best thing to do?

A Silverlining

Learning that you failed the exams for the first time is probably one of the disappointments in your life that you will not forget. Looking back at the hours you spent studying, preparing, sleeping that you missed, and countless hours of reviewing that all came down to failing NCLEX is a heartbreaking ordeal. But with all of this, there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. Retaking the exams is your next best option. 

What to Do After You Failed the NCLEX Exams

If you are reading this part of the post, then chances are, you have failed the exams. But, do not worry. You can still retake the exams as long as you follow these steps and do your best next round. 

Understand Why You Failed

Failing the NCLEX exams is not the end of the world; although it is a bit traumatic, you must gather yourself and try again. Understanding why you failed is crucial at this point. Failing does not mean that you are dumb or stupid. Most importantly, failing this exam does not mean you won’t make a great nurse. The truth is, some of the best nurses in the field had their fair shares of failures. So, do not beat yourself up on this one. Some people are not good at taking tests, maybe you did prepare for this, but your nerves got the better of you. Either way, it is okay that you failed. 

Process your NCLEX Results

A single day can make a big difference in your ability to process the results of your NCLEX exams. Taking the following steps is crucial, but before you do, take time to go through your results and reflect. Of course, there might be some feelings of discouragement, but don’t give up yet. Give yourself some time, and evaluate how you feel before moving forward. Once you feel better, proceed to the next step. 

Select a Date for the Following NCLEX Exams

After reflecting on your emotions (and maybe crying hysterically on your pillow), take time to educate yourself on retaking the test. Keep in mind that you can take the NCLEX exams at least eight times per year with 45 days waiting period between attempts. So, all in all, there is hope for you. 

The National Council will send you a notice about the options for retaking the exams. If you want, check their website to find out the details in the re-application process for this. But, if by chance you feel lost, ask your school to assist you with the process. Of course, the council will also inform them that you failed the exams, so it is best to work with your school for this step. However, if you want to do it yourself, you can visit NCSBN.org for more information.

Your NCLEX Study Plan is Essential

After securing the date for retaking the exam, check how much time you have left to study for the NCLEX. Come up with a strategy so you can nail the exams this time. Check how you prepared in your first attempt; what did you do that helped you? See what study habit works best for you, and be clear about how you alter your approach in this next attempt. Be sure to have a proper amount of study time too. You can also use the NCLEX Candidate Performance Result or CPR to determine which areas you need to focus more on. It will also help as your study guide since you already know which topics you are weakest at and those that are not.

Study Plans, Study Plans

Creating a study plan and calendar is helpful. Writing down the details and activities in this calendar will give you timeframes as well. Find the focus of your study and dive deep into the areas you are not confident in. Be sure to include test strategies and practice questions as well. Include at least five days for studying with two days for rest. Keep your study hours to not more than 6 hours a day. Make sure to have breaks in between for 45 to 60 minutes. However, you create your study plan, be concrete on following through with them until you are ready for the exams. 

Go and Retake the Exams

As you enter your test room, relax. Have confidence in yourself. You already know the dynamics of the exams; you studied and prepared for it, so you got this. Don’t think of the failure you did, do not dwell in the past. Focus on how you tackle the test questions and apply the strategies that you learned. Be mindful of your pace, and always understand each question before answering. Do not rush or panic. Take it easy, pray, and do your best! 

So what if you failed the NCLEX exams

Failing an important exam such as NCLEX can be heartbreaking, but do not panic. You have all the options and time to get it right. But this does not mean you should fail every time you try! So you failed; we have done this one way or another. It is not an excuse, but it is not a reason not to keep trying either. You have all the access you need to pass the exams, use them wisely, study well, and most of all, keep trying! Passing the NCLEX is within your reach, so don’t ever give up! We hope that this post sheds light on your path, good luck!

 

How Covid-19 Impacted Nurses at Work

How Covid-19 Impacted Nurses at Work

How Covid-19 Impacted Nurses at Work

Covid-19 impacted nurses in the most brutal ways. Many nurses are exhausted, depressed, and in some cases, dying. While the pandemic is still on the rise, nurses suffer more than ever. But how did the pandemic change nursing? How can nurses get help? 

Covid-19 Impacted Nurses Psychologically and Physically

Caring for patients sick with Covid left many nurses not only exhausted physically but mentally as well.  As a result of this, many nurses are no longer functioning well at work. And when nurses cannot function properly, the quality of care delivered also decreases. Here’s how Covid-19 impacted nurses

Anxiety

Many nurses are facing pressure as they continue to care for sick patients. As the number of patients also increases, the levels of stress among nurses also rise. Because it’s not specific as to when the pandemic ends, many nurses anticipate the worse. That said, many of them have developed anxiety. 

Depression

Taking care of sick patients along with the dying ones caused some nurses to develop depression. Added to the high stress that they face every day at work, it’s not surprising to see nurses develop feelings of depression and anxiety. This depression also caused nurses to be less adaptable to the changes in their environment. It also makes them less susceptible to the needs of their patients. 

Burnout

Burnout is the most common psychological phenomenon among nurses characterized by an emotional, mental and physical decline in energy. It is often caused by work-related stress, leading to cynicism towards colleagues and low self-efficacy. Many nurses feel the burnout of their job due to long hours of work and less time for rest. 

Physical Exhaustion

Anxiety, depression, and burning out are not the only problems nurses face but the physical exhaustion from their day-to-day jobs. It’s a nurse’s job to check on patients and always be on their feet, moving. With longer working hours, nurses barely get the rest they need to de-stress.

Vacation days are also kept short because of the shortage of nursing staff and the new Covid variant that’s been on the rise. As a result, nurses are drained of energy, stressed, and physically exhausted as they care for Covid-19 patients. 

How Covid-19 Impacted Nurses with Stress

Nurses deal with stress differently. Some can still function well at work while others can’t. In this pandemic, it’s hard to tell who is anxious and depressed among our nurses. However, while many nurses don’t verbalize how they feel, there are still signs that they are under extreme stress. [1]

  1. Nurses are slow to respond during crises or emergencies. 
  2. They have difficulty concentrating and managing time. 
  3. Nurses often make errors while charting or giving medications. 
  4. They show signs of emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and depersonalization. 
  5. They have poor interpersonal skills and prefer working alone. 
  6. Nurses who are anxious and stressed are known to have a short fuse. 
  7. They are known to be quick to anger towards colleagues, their families, and even patients. 
  8. Nurses perform poorly with simple tasks like calculating doses or care mapping. 

How Can Nurses Deal with Anxiety?

The Covid-19 impacted nurses’ mental health in waves. As the pandemic continued, many nurses developed anxieties. Having anxiety can be crippling, and if you are a nurse, it’s a significant hindrance in your job. So, how can nurses like you deal with stress? Here’s what you can do:

1. Being aware of your condition 

Identifying that you have anxiety is the first step in managing it. Understanding that having anxiety does not impact your value as a person and as a nurse helps encourage you to seek the support you need. 

2. Ask for Help 

When you have anxiety, asking for help seems like an impossible thing to do. In some cases, nurses will choose to ask for help in situations that are too stressful. Others will inform close people that they are dealing with anxiety and depression. Regardless of how you want to ask for help, reaching out to your peers or mentors will help you get the support you need. 

3. Get enough rest

Nurses work long shifts every week. Dealing with different people, sick patients, and working with other healthcare professionals can be exhausting at the end of the day. Getting enough sleep, exercise, eating, and having space to de-stress is crucial for your well-being. It will also help you get back on your feet so you can help others again.

4. Seek professional help

If getting enough sleep, exercising, and relaxation doesn’t help ease your anxieties, it’s time to seek professional help. Psychiatrists, psychologists, and mental health counselors can help manage your depression and anxiety. They will teach you coping techniques and help empower nurses like you to manage their mental health and minimize its effects on your work. 

How Can Nurses Get Support from their Workplace

Nurses must get the support their needs regarding mental health at work. The nurse administrator’s job is to provide help, guidance and mentor nurses suffering from burnout during the pandemic [2]. Other ways they can help nurses are as follows:

1. Educating staff/team 

One of the best ways to support nurses suffering from anxiety and depression is by educating their team or staff. New and veteran nurses that are suffering from mental health issues may experience isolation among their peers. It is why it’s essential to help educate staff members about mental health and that talking about it is not a sign of weakness or insignificance. 

2. Provide support systems

A reliable support system in terms of mental health is vital to nurses. Leaders at work should help motivate and encourage nurses. Providing space for them to talk about their feelings about mental health is also a good idea. It will help them realize that they are not alone and their feelings are valid. 

3. Campaigning for self-care

As nurses, it’s easy to get lost in work and focus on the goals of taking care of people. However, when it comes to mental health, nurses are encouraged to take care of themselves first. Think about it, how can nurses take care of others if they don’t care for themselves? Nurse leaders must set an example on balancing work and personal care by allowing them to catch the much-needed breaks. 

4. Give access to resources

One of the best ways to help nurses suffering from anxiety and depression is to access internal and external behavioral health resources. Crisis hotlines, mental health counselors, or mental health screening must be readily available for them. Nurse leaders should be alert on giving access to their staff so they can get help early on. 

Nurses Are Still Going to Work, But They Need Help

The Covid-19 impacted nurses like an iceberg. No one knew how big and wide the pandemic was going to be until it reached countries around the world. Being a nurse during the Covid-19 pandemic is a challenging position to be.

There’s no denying that many nurses are tired, physically and mentally. But because they need to keep going, many nurses suppress their own emotions for fear of being stigmatized.

However, this is not going to benefit them at all. It is up to nurse leaders and managers to reduce this stigma surrounding mental health and make their nursing staff feel supported during these trying times.