Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

So, you are a nurse who is looking for something new to do. You love your job set-up in the healthcare facility you currently work in, but your mind wanders. It would help if you had an adventure. You need to fuel your passion! If this is your current mindset right now, sign up to be a travel nurse and get to choose ten of the best places for this job. 

Where Can Travel Nurses Work?

#1. Alaska

With stunning views and a vast space for fishing, Alaska is home to the largest hospital in the city, the Providence Alaska Medical Center. Travel nurses who enjoy activities like camping, fishing, and boating will surely enjoy Alaska. The growing healthcare industry and great pay are why many travel nurses chose this destination for work [1]. With the city’s unique features and long sunny days, Alaska is ideal for those interested in working here as a nurse and enjoying the outdoors. Make sure to bring plenty of sunscreens! 

#2. California

Cali is home to excellent teaching hospitals, including the UCLA Medical Center, UCSF Medical Center, and others. Not only that, but California is also one of the highest paying nursing salaries in the country. If you love the idea of learning and visiting California’s famous landmarks, this is an exciting place to choose! If you love beaches, California has plenty, and if you are a wine enthusiast, you will surely enjoy the endless array of vineyards there too. There are plenty of places to explore so you will surely love your time here. 

#3. Texas

If you want to work in Texas, Austin is the place to be. Ranked as one of the most popular locations for travel nurses, Austin is a fast-growing city with a high density of healthcare facilities to keep the flow of nurses constant. Besides the booming healthcare industry, Austin is also a hub for entertainment. If you love food, music, and festivals, Austin is your next best destination.

#4. Florida

Another popular destination for travel nurses to work in is Florida – Miami, in particular, is a rather popular state to be in. If you are looking for warm weather and beaches, Florida is an excellent choice. It is a popular location for nurses who enjoy spending time at the beach after long working hours. And if you love exploring popular tourist attractions, Florida is home to Walt Disney World, Universal Studios, and Sea World. They also offer epic nightlife destinations like the Design District, Downtown, and many others. All in all, it is a well-rounded city with many things to do after your shift.

#5. Hawaii

As a travel nurse, you have the opportunity to work in different locations, even with the pandemic travel restrictions that we have now. If you are interested in working far from the usual continental U.S. sights, you can apply for work in Hawaii. However, this may be steep competition as it takes time to get approval for a work permit. But with patience, you too can land an assignment here. Just be reminded that Hawaii is not exactly the place for travel nurses who want to earn top dollar, but if you are longing for an experience of a lifetime, this is it. 

#6. Colorado

Colorado is a compact nursing state which means a license in one state allows you to work assignments in another, just like Texas. If you choose urban life, Denver is an excellent choice to work and be a travel nurse. After your work, you can enjoy the breathtaking views the Rocky Mountains have to offer. If you love skiing, Colorado has plenty of winter sports activities that you will surely love. Not only that, since Colorado is a compact nursing state, you can attain greater work mobility without complications. 

#7. New York City

When we talk about New York, we always think of tall skyscrapers and high-rise apartments. But when it comes to healthcare facilities, New York is one of the best. They are known for medical centers like the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Mount Sinai Hospital. As a travel nurse, you have the opportunity to work in one of the best cities without a permanent commitment. In addition to that, New York is home to prestigious art galleries, museums, parks, and restaurants. This state is also one of those that offer nurses high salaries – which helps in the expensive nature of the city [2].

#8. Arizona

If you are looking for travel nursing opportunities that require low-cost living, then go to Arizona. Tucson City offers travel nursing opportunities that you might like. Among the best features that this city has to offer include food scenes, music, and a predominantly younger demographic of university students and a good number of retirees. So, if the desert life suits you, you might as well look into this location for travel nurse assignments.

#9. Washington

For coffee lovers who are also traveling nurses, working in Washington is a great choice. Seattle is one of the top cities in this state that offers good pay for nurses. With the current nursing shortage in this city, it is an excellent opportunity for you to grab and find an assignment. As the coffee capital of the United States, you will surely enjoy this city. If you love farmer’s markets, you can visit the Pike Place Market, considered the world’s oldest farmer’s market. They also offer museums for you to check out – the Museum of Pop Culture and Museum of Flight are among the best tourist attractions you can find here. 

#10. Chicago

As the United State’s third-largest city, Chicago is home to some of the country’s largest and most prestigious health care facilities. However, with the current pandemic, Chicago also faces nursing shortages, and the demand for nurses has pushed average salaries to $70,000 per year. If you have plans to be a travel nurse in this state, do it. Not only will you enjoy working here, but you will also love the skyscrapers and their famous park called Millenium Park. 

Pack Your Bags and Go!

If the location you would like to be a travel nurse in is not listed here, don’t worry. Many hospitals still need nurses out there, so you can choose wherever your passion takes you! And if your favorite destination is listed here, grab the chance to work today; good luck!

EP 156: How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome With Crystal Grant

EP 156: How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome With Crystal Grant

How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome

Have you ever felt like you are never good enough or good at something? Did you ever feel like you are not doing as much as others thought you to be? If you feel like a fraud or do not belong anywhere, you might be suffering from Imposter Syndrome. 

No matter your social status, race, background, skill, level of expertise are, anyone can suffer from this. We must arm ourselves with knowledge and educate others to help those who are struggling with impostor syndrome. 

Overcome Imposter Syndrome

But what is imposter syndrome anyway? How do you know if you are suffering from one? In this new episode, we would like to introduce our guest, Crystal Grant. She is a CRNA, CEO of Superscript Wellness, and author of several books. 

Crystal has also worked in the healthcare system for over 20 years and now coaches nurses and CRNAs about imposter syndrome and how to overcome it. 

She currently has a new book coming out called A CRNA’S Guide to Overcoming Imposter Syndrome. Besides working with nurses and CRNAs, she also has her line of Vitamin gummies. 

So, sit back, relax and enjoy another great episode with your favorite Cup of Nurses! 

QUESTIONS FOR OUR GUEST:

  1. Can you give some background about yourself and how you got to the position you are in today?
  2. How was life growing up? What were some of your goals in life? How have they varied over the years?
    – When we finished nursing school we were making a decent amount of money, we came out with minimal loans and we were making more money than a lot of our friends. When we looked back at where we were at the age of 21/22 compared to a lot of other people it felt like night and day. It still feels that way to this day.
  3. What is Imposter Syndrome? Do you think it comes with success?
    – Imposter Syndrome is a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts their skills, talents, or accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a “fraud”.
  4. With many psychological issues like depression and anxiety, is there a genetic predisposition to imposter syndrome? Or is there something that happens in childhood that makes people more susceptible to imposter syndrome?
  5. With the age of neuroplasticity, we can almost reprogram our brain to react differently. How can we use the concept of neuroplasticity to help us with imposter syndrome or other negative thinking?
    – Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to form and reorganize synaptic connections, especially in response to learning or experience or following injury. 
  6. We are holistic beings which means how we feel physically affects us mentally and how we treat ourselves mentally reflects on us physically.
    – How important is physical health? The importance of nutrition, exercise, and supplementation. 
  7. What are some of the ingredients in the gummies you’ve created and what are the benefits of micronutrients? 

To watch the full episode about How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome, click here and learn more 👇

 

You can also find Crystal on Instagram at @thecrystalgrant. Her book titled Overcoming Imposter Syndrome is currently available at thecrystalgrant.com. And to those interested to buy her vitamin gummies, check out superscriptwellness.com and walmart.com for more. 

TIMESTAMP:

00:00 Intro
00:47 Plugs
02:03 Episode Introduction
02:35 About Crystal
04:47 Can imposter syndrome be beneficial to someone who has it?
06:38 What happens to a person who has imposter syndrome?
09:32 Imposter Syndrome: The Perfectionist
11:28 How and when did Crystal know that she had imposter syndrome?
15:02 The 5 Types of Imposter Syndrome
17:19 How does a person get imposter syndrome?
21:26 Ways to Overcome Imposter Syndrome?
24:04 Neuroplasticity: Rewiring the brain
26:44 The best investment is in yourself.
32:53 Mindfulness and meditation can help fight Imposter Syndrome.
35:27 The lack of self-belief
37:29 How did Crystal become an entrepreneur?
39:32 How to get into the supplement business?
42:58 Built for nursing, built for success.
47:32 Where to find Crystal?

 

 

Understanding Disorders of Consciousness

Understanding Disorders of Consciousness

Understanding Disorders of Consciousness

Encephalopathy, delirium, and coma are disorders of consciousness (DOCs) frequently encountered by critical care nurses. 

For nurses in the hospital setting being able to have knowledge of encephalopathy, delirium, and coma is important in improving patient outcomes. Furthermore, it is also vital to perform standardized assessments and interventions that are consistent with the cue-response theory. 

What is the State of Consciousness? 

Plum and Posner’s Diagnosis book define consciousness, that is, being fully aware of the self and the environment, as having 2 aspects, content and arousal. 

The content of consciousness is defined as “the sum of all functions mediated at a cerebral cortical level.” The content of consciousness includes cognition, which reflects how well information is processed and stored across the 2 cerebral hemispheres.

Arousal, on the other hand, refers to the level of consciousness or state of being awake. Consciousness and responsiveness are separate phenomena. Some patients may be aware but not able to respond (eg, locked-in syndrome), and patients may respond to stimuli but not be aware of their surroundings.

Based on current research the thalamocortical interactions are crucial for consciousness experience and voluntary action. The thalamocortical system is made up of the Thalamus and Cerebral Cortex.

For Refresher: 

Thalamus – the primary function of the thalamus is to relay motor and sensory signals to the cerebral cortex.

Cerebral cortex – many areas of the cerebral cortex process sensory information or coordinate motor output necessary for control of movement. 

The Brain

The brain, like other organs, has a limited capacity to withstand injury. The brain reacts to acute stress that can result from:

  • Toxins
  • Infections
  • Inflammations
  • Metabolic or nutritional derangements
  • Use of nutrients, glucose, electrolyte level, hydration, or structural damage

 

A stress response results in multiple cellular-level processes and neurochemical changes that disrupt equilibrium.

This disequilibrium initiates multiple cascades that become a vicious cycle of competition between supply and demand, which are depicted as neuroelectrical changes on an electroencephalogram (EEG).

When the brain can no longer compensate, behavioral symptoms such as altered levels of arousal and disorganized thinking begin to develop.

Progression of Disorders of Consciousness

  1. Delirium 
    1. Delirium is a neurocognitive disorder that presents as an acute change in behavior secondary to impairments in consciousness and cognition. There are 3 types of delirium: hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed.
    2. Regardless of delirium type, individuals are often disoriented to place and time and have impairments in cognitive and visual-motor functions.
    3. Patients with hyperactive delirium tend to have greater disturbances in their circadian rhythm (ie, sleep-wake cycle) and mood lability. Conversely, patients with hypoactive delirium are more likely to be inattentive, have a flat affect, and face challenges with language.
  2. Coma
    1. Like delirium, coma is on the continuum of altered states of consciousness. However, with a coma, there is a loss of both awareness and wakefulness
  3. Minimal consciousness state
  4. Persistent vegetative state 

ICU Synposis of Consciousness

When a patient has an altered consciousness, after 2 to 4 weeks, the individual will either progressively recover, die, or transition to a minimally conscious or more persistent vegetative state.

Encephalopathy 

The term encephalopathy is derived from 2 ancient Greek words: “enkephalin”, which means “brain,” and pathos, which means “suffering” and is associated with the disease.

Encephalopathy is defined as any diffuse disease of the brain that alters brain function or structure with the “hallmark feature being altered mental status.”

Although the phrases altered level of consciousness and altered mental status are often used interchangeably with encephalopathy, they are not the same. For example, sleep is an altered level of consciousness but is not caused by injury or disease.

Chronic Encephalopathy

Chronic encephalopathy is the result of permanent, usually irreversible, structural changes within the brain. The characteristics of chronic encephalopathy are prolonged alterations in mental status that usually progress slowly.

Examples of these are brain conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias or anoxic brain injury. Acute encephalopathy results from the rapid development of abnormalities in cerebral structure and/or function.

Level of Function
Function Coma Minimally 

conscious

Vegetative state
Self-aware No Very limited No
Motor Not purposeful Severely limited Not purposeful
Respiratory Variable but depressed Variable but Depressed Normal
Sleep-wake cycles No Yes Yes
Feels pain No No

Yes 

 

 

The Mechanism Responsible (DOC’s)

  • Interruptions in the delivery or use of oxygen
  • Changes in neuronal excitability
  • Signaling alterations and changes in brain volume. 

Potential Causes

  • Hypoxia
  • Ischemia
  • Toxic and metabolic disturbances
  • Acute organ failure
  • Seizures
  • Drugs and/or alcohol
  • Infection
  • Electrolyte imbalances.

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis 

Disorders of consciousness and illness severity are linked by the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which response to stress by impairing glucocorticoid and glucose metabolism.

The severity of the DOC is directly proportional to the levels of glucocorticoids and glucose in the blood that enters the brain (Stress response). In addition to that, the levels of these substances are directly proportional to the strength of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response, and that response is directly proportional to the severity of the illness.

Early  First Signs of Delirium Are Often:

  • Subtle changes in focus and attention, including distractibility, 
  • Delays in responding to stimuli
  • Short-term memory deficits
  • Disorientation

Prevention of Delirium in the Hospital

Nurses should pay particular attention to the following to prevent and resolve delirium:

  • Resuming home medications
  • Minimizing the use of chemical and physical restraints,
  • Providing adequate pain management and high-quality basic nursing care. 
  • Practice habits such as nighttime bathing, promoting uninterrupted sleep as well as day-time activity 
  • Hydration
  • Nutrition
  • Early mobility

Nursing Care for Comatose Patients in the ICU

  • Enteral tube feeding
  • Promotion of regularity of bowel and bladder functions
  • Airway management such as suctioning tracheostomy tube
  • Management of muscle tone (excessive tightness of muscles)
  • Prevention of infections such as pneumonia and urinary tract infection
  • Management of other medical concerns such as fever, seizures, etc

 

Source:
https://www.aacn.org/docs/cemedia/c2161.pdf

If you want to know more about the disorders of consciousness, check out our full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Intro
00:44 Plugs
02:31 Episode Introduction
04:35 What exactly is consciousness?
06:37 What happens to the brain?
11:38 Progression of disorders of consciousness
17:24 What is encephalopathy?
19:58 The mechanism responsible for the disorder
20:37 The Potential Causes of Consciousness Disorder
24:57 FUN FACT: How does DOC severity determine?
25:52 What are the early signs of delirium
28:54 How to prevent and resolve delirium
32:23 Nursing care for comatose patients in the ICU
33:55 Area management
35:10 Wrapping up the episode

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Body?

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Body?

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Body?

Can caffeine affect your body? The short answer is yes. In this episode and honor of Caffeine Awareness month, we will discuss how caffeine affects your body and is effects after consuming it for a long time.

Most Americans use caffeine daily but don’t even know what it is or what caffeine exactly does. About 85% of people in the US consume at least one caffeine beverage/per day [1]. 

What is Caffeine, and Can Caffeine Affect Your Body?

When someone says caffeine, we immediately think of coffee. And while coffee has caffeine, it’s not it. Caffeine is a bitter-tasting, white, and odorless powder. It is naturally found in the fruit, leaves, and beans of coffee, cacao, and guarana plants. The truth is that caffeine is added to almost all kinds of food and drinks. 

It is also a Central Nervous System Stimulant and one of the most common psychoactive drugs used globally. In addition to that, caffeine is the only legal, unregulated psychoactive drug. 

So, the next time you wonder why you are addicted to caffeine, it’s because of its psychoactive properties. 

How Caffeine Acts in the Body

The way caffeine works are thought to be mediated by several mechanisms: 

  • Antagonism of adenosine receptors
  • The inhibition of phosphodiesterase
  • Release of calcium from intracellular stores
  • The antagonism of benzodiazepine receptors

The most common one is that it blocks the action of adenosine on its receptors and prevents the drowsiness associated with it.

Adenosine Antagonist 

When a person is awake and alert, small amounts of adenosine are present in CNS. Over time, adenosine accumulates in the neuronal synapse by being constantly awake. 

Once adenosine increases, it binds and activates the receptors found on specific CNS neurons. 

When activated, the adenosine receptors produce a cellular response that increases drowsiness. 

What Happens to Adenosine?

  • When caffeine is consumed, it antagonizes the adenosine receptors. Caffeine prevents adenosine from activating the receptor by blocking the receptor site. Therefore, caffeine temporarily prevents or relieves drowsiness and maintains or restores alertness [2].
  • Caffeine also increases energy metabolism throughout the brain but can also decrease cerebral blood flow, which induces relative brain hypoperfusion [3].

Due to the blocking of adenosine inhibitory effects through its receptors, caffeine indirectly affects the release of the following [4]:

  •  norepinephrine
  • dopamine
  • acetylcholine
  • serotonin
  • glutamate
  • gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
  • neuropeptides 

Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase

Phosphodiesterase inhibition prevents the ability to break down cAMP and cGMP. The levels inside the cell increase, therefore, leading to a decrease in calcium levels in the cell. It leads to vasodilation and smooth muscle relaxation [5].

Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor and works mainly in your heart and brain. However, it vasodilates your peripheral and bronchial vessels as well.

Releases Calcium from Intracellular Storage

Caffeine affect the body by taking calcium from the bone and introducing it into the bloodstream. Most studies show that this amount is not substantial enough to cause osteoporosis, and the calcium loss can be replaced by adding some milk. 

Benzodiazepine Receptor Antagonist 

Studies show that caffeine has weak antagonistic properties at the benzodiazepine receptor sites. The reaction, however, can be due to adenosine suppression [6]. 

SNS vs. PNS

The parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) controls homeostasis. The PNS maintains the body at rest and is responsible for the “rest and digest” functions. 

Similarly, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) controls the body’s responses to a perceived threat and is responsible for the “fight or flight” response. 

Effects of Caffeine on the Body

Caffeine’s direct effects on the body are due to the inactivation of adenosine receptors. It leads to greater stimulation of the SNS, causing various effects. Here are the most common effects of caffeine on the body: 

Increase in alertness

  • The stimulating effects of caffeine cause alertness right away. In addition to that, it can also temporarily relieve drowsiness and fatigue.

Decreased suicide risk – check with your doctor

  • One study found that the mood-enhancing effects of caffeine were linked to a percent lower risk of suicide in participants.

Increased heart rate and blood pressure

  • Caffeine affects your body by resulting in a rapid heartbeat. In that case, this may be a concern if you have a preexisting heart issue. You may notice arrhythmias whenever you have caffeine.
  • It can also temporarily raise your blood pressure. The effects may be especially noticeable if you have caffeine during or right before exercise or other physical activity.

Confusion

  • Too much caffeine can overstimulate the brain, leading to confusion or the inability to focus on one task.

Headache

  • A headache can occur from either too much caffeine or as a symptom of caffeine withdrawal. But specific amounts can help with headaches.

Irritability

  • When your body is used to caffeine, you can experience irritability as a symptom of withdrawal.

Heartburn

  • The acidity of certain caffeinated products, like coffee and soda, may cause heartburn.

Diarrhea

  • Caffeine can also help regulate your bowel movement, but too much intake can cause opposite effects like diarrhea.

Fertility/Pregnancy

  • Some women who consume too much caffeine might experience difficulties getting pregnant. If you’re trying to get pregnant, It’s best not to consume more than 300 mg per day.
  • Consuming too much caffeine affects your body during pregnancy, which may cause miscarriage and developmental issues in newborns. 
  • It’s recommended that pregnant women consume no more than 200 mg of caffeine per day. It equals about one 12-ounce cup of coffee.

Bones

  • Caffeine prevents calcium absorption in the bones, increasing your risk of osteoporosis. As you get older, your bones may break more easily.

Urination

  • Frequent urination may be experienced when you consume too much caffeine. Caffeine affects the body as a diuretic, and long-term use of high amounts of caffeine may increase bladder instability. It can worsen the risk for those already experiencing bladder problems.

Jitters

  • Caffeine can give you the jitters if you’re not used to it. If you have an anxiety disorder or sleep disorder, caffeine may make it worse.

Metabolization of Caffeine 

  • Caffeine from coffee or other beverages is absorbed by the small intestine within 45 minutes of ingestion and distributed throughout all bodily tissues.
  • ​​Peak blood concentration is reached within 1–2 hours.
  • Caffeine’s biological half liver varies from individual to individual, roughly between 2 and 7 hrs.
  • It can also be absorbed rectally. However, the rectal route has a 30% lesser absorption rate [7].

The FDA has cited 400 milligrams a day for healthy adults—about four or five cups of coffee—as an amount not generally associated with complications.

To watch the full Episode 92, click here for more 👇

TIME STAMPS:

0:00 Intro
0:50 Plugs
2:16 Episode Intro
6:07 The only unregulated psychoactive drug
10:19 How Caffeine Acts in the Body
10:25 Adenosine Antagonist
13:03 Caffeine decreases cerebral blood flow
15:39 Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase
16:29 Releases Calcium from Intracellular Storages
18:52 Benzodiazepine Receptor Antagonist
23:13 A possible reason why you are irritable
25:00 Effects of Caffeine
25:10 Increase in alertness
29:18 Tips on setting your body clock
33:07 Estimating time when to take caffeine
39:32 Frequent urination
39:58 Too much caffeine can cause diarrhea
40:41 Decreased suicide risk
46:33 Caffeine as medicine

EP 155: Why Self-Care is Important For Women With Isabel Bogdan

EP 155: Why Self-Care is Important For Women With Isabel Bogdan

EP 155: Why Self-Care is Important For Women With Isabel Bogdan

How important is your health? Self-care is important but what steps are you taking to meet your needs? Do you do something about it? Or do you wait till you are diagnosed with a disease to get moving? In the era we live in, it is easier to pop pills when you are not feeling well than reevaluate your entire body and mind to get to the root cause of the problem. 

It is a known fact that many people today are more dependent on medication than doing something to change their condition. Why is it easier to take pills than make the change you need? When did people stop eating well and doing exercises that can benefit them as a whole?

We are joined by our guest, Dr. Isabel Bogdan, founder and owner of belev.co. She is also a health nurse practitioner with a doctorate in nursing practice. Dr. Bogdan has the vision to intertwine traditional medicine with a holistic approach for transformational change.

Join us today as we discuss the importance of holistic care and how it can change our way of looking at our health in this fantastic episode of Cup of Nurses. 

QUESTIONS FOR OUR GUEST

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic all the time so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. Can you give us a background about yourself and your nursing experience?
  2. What does it feel like to be in the daily life of Isabelle? 
  3. What have you seen as being the biggest factor associated with poor health, particularly women’s health?
  4. On an emotional level, what do women struggle with the most?
  5. How do you heal people in life?
  6. What are women struggling with most in their lives?
  7. Endometriosis?
  8. How do you control your hormonal health?
  9. How do you change people’s beliefs for them to think they’re superheroes of their journey. 
  10. What is your current obsession? – How are you making an impact in disease prevention? 

Why is self-care important? Learn more and watch the full episode here 👇

You can connect with Isabel through her Instagram @dr.isabelbogdan   or learn more about her business by visiting her website belev.co. or send her a tweet through her Twitter @isabel_bogdan

TIMESTAMP

00:00 Intro
00:49 Plugs
2:52 Episode Introduction
4:58 The Reason: Why is Conventional Medicine Failing?
8:52 All about Yoga
16:19 How is yoga done and how does it benefit the body?
20:45 Yoga’s spiritual side?
23:18 What are women struggling with most in their lives?
28:52 Isabel’s Take on What Is “Consciousness”
32:29 What is the impact of hormonal health?
38:40 What supplements can you take to stay optimal?
41:06 Dietary Consultation with Isabel
47:15 Everything is good in moderation.
51:37 All about gut health.
57:00 A study shows that cranberry juice prevents UTIs.
57:49 How to empower people to be the superheroes of their lives.
1:08:41 Where to find Isabel?