EP 193: The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

EP 193: The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

The view from the abortion clinic paints a different story. It’s where decisions are made, often for a good cause. But can women have an abortion without being judged? That is the real question.

What is Abortion? 

Abortion is defined as a procedure to end a pregnancy. It is also known as the termination of pregnancy through medications or surgical procedures. All around the world, 73 million induced abortions take place each year. Among 6 out of 10 or 61% of these abortions, are unintended pregnancies, while the remaining 21% ended as induced abortions. All abortions are 45% unsafe, and 97% occur in developing countries. 

Unsafe abortion is one of the leading but preventable causes of maternal morbidities and deaths. It also affects the physical and mental health and financial and social burdens of many women in many communities. 

As nurses, what can we do to help women who want to go through an abortion? Do we have the right to refuse to take care of patients who went through an abortion based on moral objection? And when will abortion be normalized in our society? These are the questions we must answer. 

Our Guest for Today’s Episode

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Patrice D’Amato. Patrice is a nurse, educator, and author of a new book, The View from the Clinic: One Nurse’s Journey in Abortion Care. She has practiced nursing in various settings in her 38-year nursing career, including med/Surg, critical care, nursing education, and women’s health. After earning her Master’s degree in Adult Health, she worked as an NP in several abortion clinics and 20 years later returned to the field while writing her book about her experiences.

QUESTIONS FOR OUR GUEST

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

We are looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a little background about yourself? 
  2. Working in healthcare for over 30 years, what have you seen over time? 
    • How has nursing evolved or changed?
    • Have you seen a more significant connection to the mind/body/spirit approach vs. just medical treatment?
  3. How was it working in an abortion clinic?
    • How has it changed over time?
  4. Did your perspective or opinion change on abortions while working with them?
  5. Was it hard for you to work in that setting? What made you gravitate toward it? 
  6. One of the counterarguments for legalizing abortion has been its potential intent to be used as a contraceptive. Were there any “frequent fliers”?
  7. Did you get the opportunity to find out why women are getting abortions? If so, what was the most common reason?
  8. You wrote a book titled; The View from the Clinic: One Nurse’s Journey in Abortion Care. What made you decide to write it?
    • What do you outline or focus on in the book?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Links: 

Book: www.theviewfromtheclinic.com 

To watch and learn more about abortion, click here for the entire episode 👇👇👇

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:58 About Patrice D’Amato
04:28 How has nursing evolved or changed?
06:50 How was it working in an abortion clinic?
11:03 Thoughts on abortion
11:47 What is a medical abortion
13:04 How a surgical abortion procedure looks
15:52 Perspective on abortion
18:02 Spirituality and abortion
21:20 How Patrice deals with guilt
24:16 Relief after an abortion
26:41 abortion and the patient’s mental health
29:16 Cases of abuse and unwanted pregnancy
31:21 The future of abortion
34:48 The fetus worship
40:37 Probirth v.s Pro-life
42:12 Generational traumas
46:11 Rewiring your system
48:58 Wrapping up the episode

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving problems in leadership is the key to easing the burden of many nurses and healthcare professionals. Burnout is an ongoing issue that many nurses are experiencing. The sad thing is it can happen to anyone’s career. Long-term stress can cause anyone mental and physical exhaustion. And for the nursing profession, burnout results from their demanding job, nursing shortages, and frequent exposure to human suffering. 

Nurses are witnesses to death and grieving families each day. Add the long work hours, complex patients, workplace drama, and not having effective support or leadership in the workplace can lead to intense burnout. When you are burnout, you feel helpless, but if you know how to manage it, you can enjoy a successful nursing career. But the question remains, how can we help our healthcare leaders? Is there a way in solving problems in leadership?

Our Guests

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson, co-founders of MissingLogic. With more than 60 years of combined healthcare experience, they help healthcare organizations and healthcare leaders combat burnout and improve satisfaction through the power of a framework-driven approach founded on Polarity Intelligence.

We talk about how the idea of a single solution to a single problem approach does not always fit the healthcare model and how polarity plays a role in leadership and healthcare dynamics. 

 QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes. 

  1. Can you give us your nursing experience & background
  2. Based on your experience, speak to us about leadership in healthcare 
    • Why do we need new leadership norms in healthcare?
  3. What are some toxic workplace behaviors/environments that lead to burnout?
  4. What is Polarity intelligence? 
    • How does it benefit hospital organizations and nurse leaders?
    • How do you identify tension in the workplace?
  1. How do you guys go about consulting organizations in healthcare?
    • What are the three pillars of a healthy healthcare organization?
      • People, Processes, and Performance. 
  2. How do you create dynamic balance in our lives – professionally and personally?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Catch up with Michelle and Dr. Tracy to learn more about solving problems in leadership on their Instagram at @missinglogic_llc and follow them on their Facebook at Missing Logic, LLC. You can also connect with them through their LinkedIn profile at missinglogicllc for more information.

Let’s learn the ways to solve problems in leadership by watching the full episode here 👇

 

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:00 About Michelle and Tracy
05:46 Importance of healthy leadership in healthcare
09:17 Stressors for nurse managers
12:34 Toxic behavior that leads to burnout
17:23 Polarity Intelligence
21:19 Margins and the mission
24:43 Challenges in union vs nonunion hospital
30:18 Is more nurses ever the solution?
36:21 How healthcare organizations solve problems
37:46 Unit satisfaction and culture
42:31 Characteristics of good leaders
50:22 End Remarks

EP 165: Ethics of a Full Code, DNR, Partial Code

EP 165: Ethics of a Full Code, DNR, Partial Code

Ethics of a Full Code, DNR, Partial Code

Full codes and partial codes cannot be avoided whenever there is an emergency. But the question is, should people have an option to be a partial code? Is there any benefit to partial codes? Many people think there should only be two options; full code or no code.

What is the code status?

Code status is used in all hospital settings. All patients admitted to a hospital or outpatient center are assigned a code status. A code status essentially means the type of emergent treatment a person would or would not want to receive if their heart or breathing were to stop. 

Your chosen code status describes the type of resuscitation procedures you would like the health care team to do if your heart stopped beating and/or you stopped breathing. During this medical emergency, resuscitation procedures are provided quickly to keep you alive. This emergency procedure is commonly known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR. 

In the same way, there are different treatment options and goals. The expected outcomes after cardiac or respiratory arrest differ depending on the person, the severity of illness, the cause of arrest, and other factors. It is essential to discuss code status before a crisis occurs and as a condition changes.

Outcome of Resuscitation

Cardiac arrest is when the heart stops beating. About 350,000 cases occur each year outside of a hospital, and the survival rate is less than 12 percent. CPR can double or triple the chances of survival.

Even though CPR can restart someone’s heart, it can also cause harm or even prolong the dying process. The success of resuscitative efforts is not like how it is on tv, that stats are low. In 2016, the survival rate for adults after a cardiac arrest was:

  • Out-of-Hospital Arrest: 12%
  • In-Hospital Arrest: Less than 25%
    • The average survival-to-discharge rate for adults who suffer in-hospital arrest is 17% to 20%.
  • Survival rates are lower for patients with advanced age, cancer, sepsis, renal failure, or liver failure. The survival rates for patients with a chronic illness or advanced illness average 5% and less than 1% respectively.
  • More than 40% of survivors are discharged with a significant decrease in their functional ability. 

Different Types of Code Statuses

Just like there are different treatment modalities there are different code statuses. There isn’t only 1 route and you can choose different options, however, there is a limit on what we can and can’t do. 

    1. Full Code: We do anything and everything to try and bring you back. This includes CPR, intubation, medications, lines, and procedures. 
    2. DNR: This is a Do Not Resuscitate order. When your heart stops we will not attempt to do anything. We will let you pass without any interventions. 
    3. Partial Code: This one can be a little complicated because there a few measures you can choose to have done or choose not to have done. 
      1. Meds Only: In this situation, if your heart were to stop we would not perform CPR or intubation. What we would do is use medication to bring you back. We can push epinephrine, give bicarbonate, start levophed or other pressors to try and keep your heart beating or start it back up. 
      2. No CPR: Some patients do not want CPR performed but are open to everything else. Defibrillation, intubation, and medication are all used. 
  • DNI – Do not intubate. There are patients that want everything to be done but not get a breathing tube placed

What is the Ethics of Partial Codes?

The main objection to partial code orders is that they are ineffective in sustaining life and can potentially deceive the patient and/or patient’s family into believing that resuscitation is possible when, in fact, the patient’s death is imminent. 

  • The concept is that you need hands on the chest to resuscitate someone. Once a heart stops beating there is no more circulation so there is no oxygen being fed into the tissue. Every second cell dies without any pressure from the heartbeat. 

People always want to make exceptions for everything. But when it comes to life it’s either you’re 2 feet in or 2 feet out. Is there such a thing as partial living? Then why should there be partial codes? Why should we hold back or delay treatment if the person/family is set on them surviving? Why not give them a full opportunity?

Many people would agree that there should only be 2 options; 

  1. Full code as in to do everything
  2. No code as in does nothing but comfort. 

It’s either we try to keep them alive or not. Why do people persistently make partial codes as in they want to “maybe” live? 

Why partial codes?

Many people don’t understand the reasoning behind a partial code. Let’s think about it. 

If you have ever seen a code blue with good chest compressions it is not a pleasant thing to witness. A lot of times a guy pushes on someone’s chest very hard and most of those times it leads to the sternum and other bones being broken. 

We can understand how enduring it is for the family to see. They see their loved ones and want them to at least have some chance. But partial codes give the lowest chance. 

  • Maybe there should be orders that state can intubate for respiratory distress but now when a pulse is lost. But then what if the pt loses a pulse during intubation. 

How much time do we have until brain damage?

  • When cardiac arrest occurs, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) must be started within two minutes. After three minutes, global cerebral ischemia, the lack of blood flow to the entire brain, can lead to brain injury that gets progressively worse.
  • By nine minutes, severe and permanent brain damage is likely. After 10 minutes, the chances of survival are low.
  • Even if a person is resuscitated, eight out of every 10 will be in a coma and sustain some level of brain damage. Simply put, the longer the brain is deprived of oxygen, the worse the damage will be.

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 intro
00:51 Plugs
01:23 Episode Introduction
02:37 What happens in a code status

05:25 A very slim chance of surviving a cardiac arrest
07:25 What is a code status?
09:16 Full Code, No Code, Partial Code
11:58 Family members are not educated well with code status
14:45  Partial Code rarely or does not work at all
17:45 Sad situation of a full code patient
20:12 How much time do we have until brain damage?
21:53 Call for physicians to step up and decide code status in real-time
25:12 Improvements that can be done
27:25 Patient’s family are very reliant on healthcare providers
30:27 Getting clear on what code to choose

 

Soil Degradation and Human Demise

Soil Degradation and Human Demise

Soil Degradation and Human Demise

Soil degradation and retrogression are two regressive evolution processes associated with the loss of equilibrium of stable soil. So we think that soil degradation and human demise are the end results if this kind of soil condition continues. 

Retrogression is primarily due to soil erosion and corresponds to a phenomenon where succession reverts the land to its natural physical state. 

  • Soil is lost due to erosion from wind and water— for example, rivers washing upland or wind blowing dirt away.

Degradation is due to the replacement of primary plant communities by secondary communities. This replacement modifies the humus composition and amount and affects the formation of the soil. 

  • It is directly related to human activity. 

What is Soil?

The definition of soil is “The unconsolidated mineral or organic material on the immediate surface of the Earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.” [1].

Soil is one of the world’s most needed resources. We think about animals and this idea of going “plant only” but don’t understand that this might not be the best thing for ourselves and our environment. 

When was the last time, if ever, we thought about soil health? It isn’t something that comes to mind as necessary, even when we think about human survival. Ask yourself what do humans need to survive? Water and food.

Water is found in natural bodies of water, but where do you get food from? Soil is required for plants, animals require plants, and as humans, we need to eat animals and plants. 

The Soil Profile

As soils develop over time, layers (or horizons) form a soil profile. Most soil profiles cover the earth as two main layers—topsoil and subsoil.

Soil horizons are the layers in the soil as you move down the soil profile. A soil profile may have soil horizons that are easy or difficult to distinguish. [2]

Most soils exhibit 3 main horizons:

  • A horizon: humus-rich topsoil where nutrient, organic matter, and biological activity are highest (i.e., most plant roots, earthworms, insects, and micro-organisms are active). The A horizon is usually darker than other horizons because of the organic materials.
  • B horizon: clay-rich subsoil that is often less fertile than the topsoil but holds more moisture. It generally has a lighter color and less biological activity than the A horizon. Texture may be heavier than the A horizon too.
  • C horizon: underlying weathered rock (from which the A and B horizons form).
  • Some soils also have an O horizon, mainly consisting of plant litter accumulated on the soil surface.

The properties of horizons are used to distinguish between soils and determine land-use potential.

What is in the soil we use?

Soil contains air, water, minerals, and plant and animal matter, both living and dead. These soil components fall into two categories. 

  • In the first category are biotic factors—all the living and once-living things in the soil, such as plants and insects. 
  • The second category consists of abiotic factors, including all nonliving things—minerals, water, and air. 

The most common minerals found in soil that support plant growth are phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen gas. Other less common minerals include calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. The biotic and abiotic factors in the soil make up the soil’s composition.

Minerals

The most significant component of soil is its minerals, accounting for about 45% of its volume. The most common ones are phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen. While the less common ones are magnesium, calcium, and sulfur. 

Water

Water is the second essential component of soil. It makes up approximately 2% to 50% of the soil volume. It is vital for transporting nutrients to growing plants and soil organisms and facilitating biological and chemical decomposition. Soil water availability is the capacity of a particular soil to hold water available for plant use.

Organic Material 

Organic matter is the next primary component found in soils at levels of approximately 1% to 5%. This matter is derived from dead plants and animals and has a high capacity to hold onto and provide the essential elements and water for plant growth. An organic matter has a tall “plant available” water-holding ability and CEC, which can enhance the growth potential of soils. 

Gas

Gases and air are the following essential component of soil. They make up approximately 2% to 50% of the soil volume. Oxygen is necessary for root and microbe respiration, which helps support plant growth. 

Carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas are also crucial for belowground plant functions like nitrogen-fixing bacteria. If soils remain waterlogged (where gas is displaced by excess water), it can prevent root gas exchange, leading to plant death, a common concern after floods.

Microorganisms

Microorganisms are the final fundamental element of soils. They are present in the ground in high numbers but make up less than 1% of the soil volume. An estimate is that, one thimble full of topsoil hols more than 200,000 microbial organisms.
 
Earthworms and nematodes are the largest organisms found in soil. The smallest are algae, fungi, actinomycetes, and bacteria. Microorganisms are the primary decomposers of raw organic matter. Many decomposers eat up organic matter, water, and air. This is to recycle natural organic matter into humus, rich in plant nutrients [3].

Nutrient Depleted Soil

Nearly 99 percent of the world’s daily calorie intake can be traced back to the soil. The plants and animals we eat require soil to grow. Soil is vital for human survival, yet modern farming and agricultural practices quickly destroy it. 

Worldwide, one-third of the Earth’s soil is at least moderately degraded, and over half of the land used for agriculture has some soil degradation.

Due to intense, mismanaged farming, soil nutrients are declining. 

  • Nitrogen stores have decreased by 42 percent
  • Phosphorus by 27 percent
  • Sulfur by 33 percent. 

Plants require these nutrients for photosynthesis, enzymes, protein synthesis, and more to grow optimally.

As a result of declining soil fertility and selective breeding, the nutritional contents of some fruits, vegetables, and grains have also been compromised. 

  • In a 2004 study using USDA data, 43 garden crops were analyzed to compare nutritional content in 1950 versus 1999. Some nutrients were unchanged, but calcium, phosphorus, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin C were lower in 1999 compared to 1950, ranging from a 6 percent to 38 percent drop [4].

The protein content in corn declined from 30 percent to 50 percent from 1920 to 2001, while the starch content increased [5].

The magnesium content of vegetables and wheat has declined by up to 25 percent. There are trace minerals in vegetable crops. Minerals like manganese, zinc, copper, and nickel, have decreased over the last decades. Toxic minerals like aluminum, lead, and cadmium have increased [6].
 
Grains, soy, and corn are low on the nutrient density scale. Far below organ meats, meat, eggs, dairy, vegetables, and fruits.

Modern Agriculture and Soil

The current agriculture methods produce higher yields but deplete and erode soils. Currently, industrial agriculture is destroying the soil. It is being destroyed at 100 to 1,000 times the rate where it is replenished. It is according to the United Nations estimates. According to their report, we only have 60 years left of harvest in many farming regions.

What contributes to soil degradation and human demise?

Monoculture

Many industrial farms grow one single crop, year after year after year. This kind of practice depletes the soil and contributes to carbon loss and soil erosion. Agricultural farms must include perennial crops, legumes, and forages in rotation. This returns the organic matter in the soil, prevents decay, and replenishes nutrients.
  • For example, legume crop residues can be converted into nitrogen by soil bacteria, reducing the need for synthetic nitrogen-based fertilizers.

Additionally, monocropping can threaten food security. With a single crop species on millions of acres, one disease could potentially wipe out an entire food system.

Synthetic Fertilizers

Instead of using organic fertilizers, including crop rotations, cover crops, and manure, modern farms require massive amounts of synthetic fertilizers to grow crops continually. 

  • Nitrogen-based fertilizer production has increased by 9.5-fold since 1960. Fertilizer production consumes fossil fuels in a very energy-intensive process, with non-negligible environmental consequences. 

Not all the fertilizers applied are used up by the crops. Fifty percent or more of the nitrogen leaches into the environment. Many inorganic fertilizers destroy soil microbes that have roles in soil homeostasis.

  • Ammonia, nitrate, and other nitrogen residues make their way to groundwater, rivers, and eventually, the ocean. They reduce oxygen levels, increase algae growth, and damage or death to aquatic life. 

Tillage-Based Farming

Farms today till fields to remove crop residues, flatten the land, and generally mix up the topsoil. However, tilling reduces microbe populations in the soil, promotes soil erosion, and releases greenhouse gases. Today, 93 percent of the world’s cropland uses tilling-based methods for production.

Herbicides, Pesticides, and Fungicides

Herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides can help increase crop yield. By keeping weeds and harmful organisms under control. The benefits come with costs. And when this problem continues soil degradation and human demise is going to be our future. 
 
Pesticides destroy the microbial populations in the soil too. It can also disrupt honeybee and butterfly populations, impacting pollination.
  • Additionally, pesticide residues make their way into water systems and food. Many health problems have been linked to pesticide exposure, including asthma, neurological issues, and even cancer. 
  • The most well-known herbicide is glyphosate, which is applied to crops for hundreds of millions of pounds each year. Glyphosate has profound environmental and health consequences, covered in this article.

Mismanaged Grazing

Cows and other ruminants have the unique ability to convert grasses and other plants that are inedible for humans into nutrient-dense, edible animal products.
 
Best practices dictate that ruminants should rotate among different fields, allowing sections of grass to rest and regrow
 
But when cows graze on the same land as in many conventional farms, it contributes to soil erosion. It lowers soil carbon reserves. Overgrazing contributed to the loss of about one-fifth of the world’s grasslands

[7].

  • Unfortunately, the importance of ruminant animals has been almost forgotten. Due to rocky terrain, hills, and climate, much of the world’s land isn’t even conducive for growing crops. 
  • In contrast, cows, sheep, and goats can often thrive on these marginal lands. Yet these areas aren’t being fully utilized to raise ruminants for food and to sequester carbon properly. Instead, we have concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFO, where grazing is limited, cows are fed grain residues from an outlying farm.

Unity Between the Human Body and Soil

Our body is from soil and water. Without those 2, there is minimal to no possibility of human life. The quality of soil impacts the quality of our physical, spiritual, and mental selves. 
 
Think about evolution or spirituality – if we stem from one at one point. We were the soil or some component of it, so now we are forever bound to the ground. In that soil, there is life, and from that life, there comes bigger life. Not only does it help in a physical sense but spiritual sense too.
 
When you eat bad food, you feel sick. This sickness manifests physically, mentally, and even spiritually. If you have food poisoning, how do you move? How does it then change your thinking? How does it influence your beliefs? Soil connects to us.
 
We are treating soil like some infinite disposable thing. Now take a look at how some humans treat other humans? How toxic people in power treat people below them.
 
The word human stems from the word “humus” in Latin, which means soil. As translated to “living soil” – as in the ground needed for growth. Less and less nutrient-dense foods can lead to the shunting of human growth and function.
 

To learn more about soil degradation and human demise, watch the full Episode 96 in this video 👇

SHOW NOTES:

00:00 Intro
00:52 Plugs
02:08 Soil Degradation and Human Demise
07:25 What is soil?
09:54 The layers of soil
12:35 The essential life-building blocks in soil
16:43 Nutrient Depleted Soil
20:37 Soil Erosion: Monoculture
21:58 Soil Erosion: Synthetic Fertilizers
24:21 Soil Erosion: Tillage-Based Farming
25:19 Soil Erosion: Herbicides, Pesticides, and Fungicides
27:35 Soil Erosion: Mismanaged Grazing
30:14 Unity Between the Human Body and Soil
35:20 Wrapping up the episode

EP 157: A Nurses Perspective on The RaDonda Vaught Case

EP 157: A Nurses Perspective on The RaDonda Vaught Case

Medical Errors and the RaDonda Vaught Case

The RaDonda Vaught case is controversial because of its nature – Vaught being a nurse and how her actions led to the death of a patient. As one of the leading causes of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer, medical errors rank third. But why is this so? What are the common medical errors that can happen to a patient? Is there a future left for Vaught?

In a study done at John Hopkins in 2016, more than 250,000 people in America die of medical errors each year. Other reports indicated that the numbers are as high as 440,000. 

The RaDonda Vaught Case Overview

Miss RaDonda Vaught was a former nurse from Tennesse. She was accused of dispensing the wrong medicine, which led to the death of her patient. Her trial begins this March 2022. Because of her actions, she was charged with reckless homicide and felony abuse of an impaired adult. 

The RaDonda Vaught Case’s Timeline

To get a better view of what this case is all about, here is the timeline of events:

Dec. 24, 2017 – Charlene Murphey was a long-time resident of the Nashville suburb of Gallatin. She came to Vanderbilt with a subdural hematoma. A subdural hematoma is also known as bleeding in the brain. 

Dec. 26, 2017 – Two days later, Murphey’s condition showed improvement. She was almost ready to be discharged from Vanderbilt. She was then sent to get her final PET in the radiology department of the hospital. Murphey was supposed to be given a sedative called Versed.

Unfortunately, instead of the said sedative, she Murphey was given a dose of vecuronium. This drug is a powerful paralyzing medication. According to federal investigations report, this drug left Murphey brain dead.
 
Vaught allegedly admitted to hospital staff that she was responsible for the said medical error. She stated that she went to the Pyxis that released medications and realized that the patient’s prescription had not been sent over
 
She then overrode the system by typing “ve” and selecting the first medication that came up. The drug she chose was Vecuronium bromide, which is a paralytic. 
 
Murphey was found unresponsive after 30 minutes and required CPR and ventilation. Although she was placed on life support, she died after 12 hours. 

Dec. 27, 2017 – Murphey’s family gathers at Vanderbilt to say their goodbyes. She was then disconnected from the breathing machine, calling her time of death around 1 a.m. 

Plaintiff vs. Defendant

Assistant District Attorney Chad Jackson said there is no way to prove that Vaught could have pulled the right medicine from the machine with the way she used it
 
Vaught’s attorney, Peter Strianse, said he plans to show that the medicine-dispensing cabinet was in permanent override mode.
 
A reckless homicide case can carry a sentence of up to 12 years in jail, while impaired adult abuse carries a penalty of up to 15 years.

Updates on the Court Case:

The plaintiff asked the defense counsel not to ask any witnesses. This was about the actions done by Vanderbilt University Medical Center. And the measures are taken by VUMC after the victim’s death. 
 
It is not out of willful neglect, so why should the defense not be able to ask questions? We should look at the whole picture and details. 
 
For one, we are looking at the vacuum problem of the machine. It is like half of the situation was not taken into consideration. As nurses, we need to support her. 
 
The defense counsel couldn’t bring up the patient’s family’s settlement with Vanderbilt University.

Conclusion: Anyone can make mistakes, but medical errors aren’t the result of just one person or party. 

How does the nursing profession feel about this?

RaDonda Vaught’s case could have been a mistake that caused her career. It’s crazy that each shift as healthcare professionals could cost us our careers if we don’t pay close attention to detail.
 
Talk about stressful jobs! This case has sparked a rallying cry for nurses who worry that honest mistakes can be criminalized and they can lose their jobs.
 
This case also has a few loops that can cause future problems for the hospital. The hospital did not report the fatal medication to the state that caused the error, as required by law.
 
The two Vanderbilt doctors told the medical examiner that Murphy died a “natural” death. And that her cause of death was an intracerebral hemorrhage. The government regulators didn’t discover this error. Then they got an anonymous complaint ten months later.

Medical Errors

Medical errors have a huge cost on healthcare. They cost about $20 billion per year. This leads to more expensive interventions needed to correct or treat more issues.

Reporting Issues of Med Errors

Despite medical errors affecting so many patients, it is often unreported. In 2017, the NORC at the University of Chicago surveyed medical errors and patients’ experiences with them.
 
This survey of adults found that in 32% of cases where a patient experienced an error, the health facility informed the person of it. Sixty-seven percent said no one told them.
 
The CDC fails to classify errors on a death certificate when collecting health statistics to paint the bigger picture. This problem makes it even harder to know accurate data about how often these med errors occur.

Why Medical Errors Happen

Working in a hospital can be chaotic at times. Nurses handle all kinds of responsibilities. From taking care of patients, doctors’ orders, and working with other healthcare workers. Adding up to these are administering different types of medications and operating machines.
 
These are a few of a nurse’s responsibilities to help provide the best patient care. It can be a stressful environment and nurses are human beings. They cannot do everything with precision and medical errors cannot be avoided. But what are the most common medical mistakes?

The reason why medical errors occur in the hospital:

  • Communication problems
  • Staffing problems and workflow
  • Inadequate policies and ratios
  • Inadequate information flow
  • Patient-related issues
  • Technical failure

Think about the most recent time a medical error was made in your care of someone close to you. 

  • The mistake was made during a test, surgery, or treatment.
  • A medical problem was misdiagnosed.
  • Received a diagnosis that didn’t make sense.
  • Given the wrong instructions about follow-up care.
  • Administered the wrong medication dosage.
  • Received treatment that was not needed.
  • Were given instructions from different providers.
  • Got an infection after hospitalization or treatment.
  • Received the wrong medication from a pharmacy. 
  • Fell down or fell out of bed.
  • Got bedsore.

Watch the full video on this episode here and learn more about RaDonda Vaught’s case👇👇 :

TIMESTAMP:

00:00 Intro
00:49 Plugs
02:09 Episode Introduction
03:00 Medical Errors Happening in the United States
04:52 The RaDonda Vaught Case
06:29 How and why did the patient die?
10:50 Plaintiff vs. Defendant
13:31 Time versus the SOP
17:03 The misinformation about the drug
23:07 Reporting issues of Medical Errors
25:50 Why Do Medical Errors Occur?
29:12 The system of double verification
31:00 Common medical errors recently committed
33:47 How to Prevent Medical Errors
36:38 Wrapping up the episode