8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 2

Our previous post tackled the eight career alternatives for nurses that you can choose to work in if you are looking for a career change. In this second part, we have added other nursing career options that you might enjoy doing in this second part. 

What are Your Choices?

If you want to boost your career as a nurse, trying these alternatives may work out for you. Here are eight choices to choose from:

Academic Nurse Writer

Have you heard about this position? An academic nurse writer is a job where nurses work outside of patient care. Nurse writers often enjoy a lucrative career in healthcare-related companies like pharmaceutical, insurance, and other patient care services. 

What they do is they create nursing-related content for websites, like training manuals or textbooks which tailors the information to the general public od other nursing professionals. 

It is an excellent opportunity for nurses who have a good background in research, writing, communication, and health services. And the best part of this is that all you need is a BSN to qualify. The average income for an academic nurse writer is $73,500 each year. 

Nurse Health Coach

Do you have an interest in working with one client or patient at a time? How about helping people achieve their health goals? If yes, becoming a nurse health coach is one of the career alternatives for nurses to pursue. 

A nurse health coach is a nurse who works one-on-one with clients to help them keep a healthy lifestyle and prevent health conditions from happening. They usually work in health care facilities, insurance companies, and social services [1]. 

Nurses in this job often create a diet plan, monitor clients, and establish safe exercise routines. It is also part of their work to help motivate clients to be in their best health. 

To qualify for the position, you should have a BSN. However, some employers don’t mind. Nurses with an associate degree can also be eligible for this position. If you want to earn more, it would be best to have a BSN degree instead. The average income for this position is $49,000 per year.

Public Health Nurse

Another exciting career alternative for nurses is to work as a public health nurse. This job addresses community health care, and nurses who choose to work in this area have the opportunity to be in social service agencies. They can also work in schools and nonprofit groups. 

The main job of nurses in this profession is to identify at-risk groups and individuals and develop preventive care programs. These programs have also been proven helpful, especially now that we are experiencing the stress of this pandemic

For a nurse to qualify for this job, one must have a Master of Science in Nursing degree in addition to their RN license. Both degrees are needed to earn more in this nursing field. The average income for public health nurses is $59,500 per year. 

Hospice Nurse

If you are interested in taking care of patients with Alzheimer’s, terminally ill patients and providing assistance to their families, being a hospice nurse is the ideal job for you. As a hospice nurse, your job is to administer pain medication, provide nursing care, and monitor the patient’s vital signs. 

If your patient is at the end-stage of life, maintaining comfort is also an essential part of your job. The hospice nurse also must provide emotional and educational support to the patient’s family. 

A BSN degree is needed for a nurse to qualify for this job. Additional hospice care and palliative nurse certifications are also helpful for nurses seeking employment. The average salary for a hospice nurse is $70,000 each year or more, depending on the certificate and training. 

Dialysis Nurse

One of the most in-demand jobs for nurses belongs to this area. Usually, dialysis nurses work for nursing facilities, hospitals, clinics, or private dialysis nurses. They care for patients who have kidney-related illnesses, where they develop treatment plans and conduct dialysis procedures for the patients. 

It would be best if you had at least a BSN and RN to qualify for the job. Other employers may also require candidates to be certified nephrology nurses or have nurse dialysis credentials to further allow for the position. An average salary for dialysis nurses is $71,100 per year. 

Legal Nurse Consultant

A legal nurse consultant is a nurse who specializes in researching medical and disability cases, employment records, and other legal documents. They also make recommendations that give legal proceedings. insurance cases and law enforcement investigations the information they need. 

Interested nurses must be licensed RNs who have completed an associate degree in this field. If you have a BSN with clinical and case management experiences, specialized legal certification, and paralegal training, you can also be a legal nurse consultant. 

You might also consider becoming a nurse attorney if you are interested in pursuing a law degree if you already have a BSN. The average income for a legal nurse consultant is $79,000 to $80,000 per year. 

Disease Prevention Nurse

Nurses who want a career in the nursing field but does not require them to be in a hospital setting can work as disease prevention nurse. Their job is to research diseases, how it spreads to patients, the community, and health care workers. 

Once they have the data they need, disease prevention nurses will analyze it and decide how to contain it, prevent it from spreading, and more. Nurses in this area can work in nursing homes, hospitals, and even private practices. 

Before qualifying for the position, applicants must have nursing experience first. They are also required to have at least a BSN under their belt. The average income for disease prevention nurses is $85,000 or more, depending on the degree they hold and nursing experience.  

Flight Nurse

Do you enjoy traveling? Are you a nurse who isn’t bothered by flying? If yes, then being a flight nurse is perfect! As one of the best nursing career jobs, this is a popular alternative for nurses who do not want to work in hospitals [2].
 
One of your primary duties as a flight nurse is to handle stressful situations while on the flight. It could be an emergency situation too, for example, a passenger on board had a heart attack. It is your role to provide emergency aid.
 
Flight nurses can also work on rescue planes where they help provide emergency care. It usually involves patients transported to hospitals via airlift.
 
Usually, flight nurses work in trauma centers, hospitals, fire departments, and many others. According to reports, this job will grow by 15% by 2026. Depending on their employers, flight nurses can earn $67,000 to $80,000 per year.

What is the Best Nursing Career Option?

All nursing fields offer unique experiences and may help increase your skills. The best ones are the ones you enjoy working as a nurse. Whether you choose to be a legal nurse consultant or a dialysis nurse, loving the job and providing the best nursing care to your patients matter most! 

To know more about nursing career options, click here for the first part.

 

EP 182: Finding Your Voice as a Nurse With Andrea Dalzell

EP 182: Finding Your Voice as a Nurse With Andrea Dalzell

Finding Your Voice as a Nurse With Andrea Dalzell

Finding your voice as a nurse is challenging for some of us. And sometimes, whenever we try to speak up, something gets in our way. Sometimes, we listen more to others than ourselves. We fail to listen to our voice and we forget that we even have one. We are caught up with so much noise and what people tell us to do.

But it is time we start listening to our own. We must find our own voice and speak up about what we want. How can we do that? Is there a process? What happens when we find our voice?

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Andrea Dalzell, also known as @theseatednurse. She studied biology and neuroscience while earning her bachelor’s degree in nursing. Andrea was diagnosed with transverse myelitis at the age of 5 and began using a wheelchair full-time at the age of 12. She is an advocate and inspiration to many nurses around the world.

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a quick bio about yourself?
  2. What was one of your biggest struggles in becoming a nurse?
  3. How difficult was it to be a nurse or land your first position in your situation?
  4. How did you find your voice through your disability? 
    1. “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Access”
  5. How are you advocating for creating more diverse and inclusive nursing environments?
    1. Disability is the fastest and largest growing minority in the world. Without disability inclusion, we could be limiting opportunities for our future selves.
  6. What is some advice you have for women who roll?
    1. Nursing can seem intimidating or unattainable to someone who uses a wheelchair because of the physical demands, but that doesn’t mean they are out of reach. 
    2. The misconception comes with the fact that a disability means you’re incapable. Not true.
  7. What are the future goals that you’re pursuing? It can be nursing or broad. 

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Catch Andrea on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook at @theseatednurse.

You can also check out her website https://www.theseatednurse.com/ and connect with her through her LinkedIn profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrea-dalzell-bsn-rn-b17a75b6/

Find your voice by clicking on the full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:01 Going through life with a disability
05:53 Life, liberty, and the pursuit of access
07:10 Bias in Healthcare
12:09 Advice for overcoming fear and adversity
17:17 How to solve roadblocks in nursing
25:47 Overcoming the feelings of judgment
30:52 Other success stories
32:26 Finding acceptance and what is normal
39:07 Creating change for people with disabilities
41:09 How other countries accommodate disabilities
42:24 Managing time while in NP school, building a nonprofit, and starting a new career
46:55 Coffee with grandma one last time and role models
49:33 Wrapping up the episode

 

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 1

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 1

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses: Part 1

There are plenty of career alternatives for nurses. Being a nurse is one of the most respected and rewarding jobs globally. But if you don’t want to do bedside nursing? Are there any career alternatives for nurses? 
 

8 Career Alternatives for Nurses to Choose From

 
Unlike other jobs, nursing has increased career growth. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects a growth of 7% in nursing employment over the next few years. That said, you should be able to pick a job within this field that does not involve working as a traditional nurse. 
 
If you are wondering what kind of careers you can work as a non-traditional nurse, here are your options:
 

1. Nutritionist

 
A nurse nutritionist is an excellent option for those nurses who are into healthy diets and lifestyles. Your job is to consult patients and help improve their health through diet and nutrition.
 
Working in this nursing field allows you to work in a medical facility with patients who are dealing with medical conditions involving diet. One of your jobs includes encouraging them to eat and offering healthy options.
 
Extra training is needed for nurses who are planning to become a nutritionist. The average income for nurse nutritionists is around $50,737 yearly. It also depends on their training and certifications. 
 

2. Nurse Manager

 
If you enjoy working in the hospital, a nurse manager is a good career alternative for nurses.  Nurse managers are also known as nurse administrators. They help manage and supervise registered nurses at work. 
 
As a nurse manager, your role is to run a nursing department, supervise teams of nurses, or help manage the clinical facility. This position often requires a Master’s in Nursing degree (MSN).
 
The average income for nurse managers is around $101,000 per year. California ranks as the state for highest-paid nurse managers. 
 

3. Nurse Researcher

 
Nurse researchers learn about medicine, how medications interact, and the study of the human body. If you enjoy researching scientific data, this job is a good choice. 
 
Many nurse researchers work in laboratories or universities. They conduct research to study, test their research, and help find a way to improve the results. Researching diseases, treatments, and other health-related topics are valuable in the healthcare industry. 
 
A nurse researcher also writes books, consults, and teaches classes. They also speak at conferences. The average income for nurse researchers is around $95,000, yearly. 
 

4. Telemedicine Nurse

 
One of the best career alternatives for nurses belongs to telemedicine nurses. This job combines technology and nursing skills to help patients within the comfort of their homes. It is a good option for nurses who want to help patients who are living in remote areas. They also help patients suffering from chronic conditions who need to stay at home and not go to a hospital. 
 
As the pandemic rolls on, it’s reported that telehealth visits have increased to 50% as of March 2020. If you want to in work in this area, experience as a floor nurse is a must. The average income for telemedicine nurses is around $75,000. 
 

5. Forensic Nurse

 
For fans of forensic science, working in this field would be a dream come true. And for nurses interested in this field, working as a forensic nurse is an option for you. 
 
The work of a forensic nurse is often stressful but very rewarding. Your job includes working with the legal systems and providing care for victims of violent crimes
 
One of your primary duties is to gather medical evidence to use in court proceedings. You may even testify in court to back up the pieces of evidence you present. Many forensic nurses often work in correctional facilities or various hospital settings. An estimated $89,000 is the average nurse pay in this field. 
 

6. Nurse Lobbyist

 
Another job that you must consider is becoming a nurse lobbyist. What do these nurses do? As a nurse lobbyist, you will work for communities, states, and countries. You will also work alongside lawmakers that government agencies use nurse lobbyists. 
 
These nurses help analyze data and health laws to improve them. The average income for nurse lobbyists is around $100,000. But if you have a higher degree or education and years of experience,  you can earn even more. 
 

7. Clinical Nurse Educator

 
If you love working in an academic setting, this is your chance to work as a clinical nurse educator. The main job description for this profession is to teach and mentor aspiring nurses. 
 
Your general role is a teacher nurse. You will be administering tests, overseeing internships, and facilitating lessons. You will also be mentoring nursing students in class or hospital settings.
 
A clinical nurse educator may also work in a medical facility. They help develop opportunities for current staff nurses and offer them ongoing training. The average income for clinical nurse educators is around $87,700. 
 

8. Nurse consultant

 
Many nurse consultants work with legal teams, offering their advice and consultation to those working in cases involving medical details. These nurses help assist, check medical charts, and often act as expert witnesses. 
 
They can also work for a medical facility, hospital, or nursing home. They offer their consultation and recommend individual treatment plans for patients.
 
Those who are already experienced in this field help check the current qualifications of nursing staff and help improve them.
 

In Closing

 
Your career as a nurse is not a boring one; there is always something to do! Of course, there are other career alternatives for nurses that you can choose from. We will tackle them in Part 2 of this post. And now that you know the different options for your career as a nurse, go ahead and check them out. You might find something you will enjoy doing for a long time!

EP 177: Treating Mental Illness With Morgan Murray

EP 177: Treating Mental Illness With Morgan Murray

Treating Mental Illness With Morgan Murray

Many of us suffer from certain types of mental disorders, and treating mental illness early on is essential to help the individual. Reaching out to talk to someone, seeking medical help, or getting the proper diagnosis can help you in many ways. And while no treatment can cure all, individuals can choose a combination of treatments that works best for them. 

Our Guest

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Morgan Murray. Morgan is a board-certified psychiatric nurse practitioner from Baltimore, Maryland. Morgan has been a travel nurse since 2014 and worked across the United States.

She also owns a private mental health practice and works as a private contractor. She also is the co-author of ‘So you want to be a nurse,’ a how-to guide for success in nursing, travel nursing, and opening up your practice from A-Z.

We talk about the roles of a psych NP and how mental health issues are treated. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. Morgan, can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
    • Where has your nursing career taken you?
    • How was the transition to becoming a psych NP, and why did you choose psych?
  2. How does it feel to own private practice?
    • How did you get started with it?
  3. You grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. How was life there for you?
    • I spent a few weeks there, and it is similar to Chicago. Lots of drugs, homeless, and violence. 
    • Did growing up there push you in the psych direction, or is there an event in your life that inspired you to pursue psych?
  4. As a psych NP, what do your day-to-day activities look like?
    • Many nurses want to become psych NPs. Can you offer some insight on schooling and what your career consists of?
  5. You’re at the forefront of mental health. Are there specific mental health issues that are more prevalent than others?
    • What percentage of patients benefit from psychiatric drugs? We’ve heard it’s around 50%? 
    • Psychiatric medications alone do not cure mental illness. Are there adjusted therapies people do?
  6. What are some positive mental health techniques nurses can do when they are stressed out, anxious, or depressed?
    • How can we stay healthy mentally? 
  7. You’ve studied under financial experts such as Dominique Broadway and Jeremy Schneider; what was your biggest takeaway? 
  8. You’ve also coAuthored in a few books. What made you decide to write books?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

If you are interested in psychiatric nursing and want to learn more about it, you can follow Morgan on her Instagram @morgansandiego or TikTok @morgansandiego. You can also check out her website https://www.iambeyondmedicine.com/ and ebook at www.iambeyondmedicine.com/shop to learn more about the world of psychiatric nursing.

Watch the full episode on how to treat mental illness by clicking here 👇

TIMESTAMP:

00:00 Introduction
01:58 About the guest
04:05 Difference between an RN and an NP
06:52 Owning a private practice
10:30 Roles and responsibilities of a Psych Nurse Practitioner
12:10 Common mental health problems pre and post-pandemic
15:15 The much-needed change to improve our healthcare system
17:06 How effective are psychiatric medications?
18:51 Medication Side Effects
21:18 Dealing with side effects
23:51 Signs of a Getting Well Patient
26:53 ADHD
29:46 Selfcare routine
32:01 What made you decide to write books?
33:42 Being financial literate
38:57 Life Advices to share
40:44 Wrapping up the episode

Travel Nurse Contracts: Crisis vs. Rapid Response

Travel Nurse Contracts: Crisis vs. Rapid Response

As a travel nurse, you will find yourself in different places and scenarios all the time. It is why learning about travel nurse contracts is essential.

While it is part of your job as a travel nurse to be assigned to different parts of the country, there will come a time when you need to answer a crisis or rapid response call.

That said, you must know the difference between a crisis and a rapid response contract so you can choose which one works well for you.

The Difference Between Crisis and Rapid Response Travel Nurse Contract

A contract is vital in a travel nurse’s job, but a few differences exist between a crisis and a rapid response contract. Knowing them both can help you identify which one is more favorable for you.

What is a Crisis Contract?

Travel nurses are usually the first people who respond to any crises across the country. A crisis contract is given to nurses when a geographical location or hospital is confirmed to be under an emergency. 

As a nurse, you must understand that this contract will put you in high-risk conditions, so reading it thoroughly is necessary.

If the crisis is urgent, this contract may also become a rapid response contract. If the problem is urgent, you may get higher wages for both contracts.

A crisis can be anything alarming or overwhelming. The best example of this case is the Covid-19 pandemic that we are experiencing right now. Another good example is when the crisis is an isolated case.

It means the issue is only specific to a particular hospital or area. For example, when natural disasters like hurricanes, flooding, etc., hits a location, travel nurses are given crisis contracts to answer the call for help.

The payment of a crisis contract varies depending on the nature of the crisis at hand [1]. The amount may also differ according to these factors:

  • The hospital’s budget.
  • The agency’s ability to negotiate the terms and conditions of your work.
  • Your skills as a nurse – if you have skills in specialized areas like ICU, OR, DR, and others, the better the pay you will get.

As you go through your contract, you will see that it outlines the specifics of your crisis pay. It may include both a higher base wage, additional stipends, and your bonuses and overtime pay.

A crisis contract may also be shorter than the regular travel nurse contracts. Your assignments are often short-term, while the standard travel nurse contract is around 16 weeks.

Many hospitals opt to hire nurses under this contract on shorter terms because they’re paid higher than others. So it would be wise to hire them for a short period than hire them for a long time and pay at higher rates.

What is  Rapid Response Contract?

A rapid response contract is when a healthcare facility hires travel nurses to fill in the job. The situation may not always be a crisis. But nurses are needed if there is a:

  • New software upgrade
  • An internal occurrence
  • An influx of non-emergency patients
Travel nurses must stay close to the facility and be ready if the hospital calls them on short notice.
 
As a rapid response nurse, you may also receive bonuses, higher base wages, and more stipends [2]. It will also depend on the following:
  • Education and certifications.
  • The number of years you are working as a rapid response nurse.
  • Nursing skills that you have.
Housing stipends are also included in your compensation. It is because finding housing near the facility on short notice is difficult.
 
Expect to work right away when you accept this kind of contract. It means you don’t have to go through lengthy briefings. 
 
In case you find yourself in this situation, being ready is always a good thing. Be sure to work with your agency in every step, so you have everything you need before working.

Choose the Right Contract

Whether you work as a crisis or rapid response nurse, be sure to choose the work where you will be happy working as one. Both positions are well compensated and need you to travel. If this makes you happy, go ahead and take the offer. Make sure to read your travel nurse contracts well for your security and safety.