EP 169: The Misconceptions of Nursing With Theresa Brown

EP 169: The Misconceptions of Nursing With Theresa Brown

The Misconceptions of Nursing With Theresa Brown

Misconceptions of nursing – what are they? How can we help highlight these issues? Nursing is a profession that isn’t for everyone. But some excel greatly in this career. And while nursing is a remarkable career that provides essential services, there are still misconceptions about it. What are the misconceptions about nursing? How can we uplift nurses?

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Theresa Brown. Theresa Brown is an author of the New York Times bestseller The Shift. She earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of Chicago and taught English before flipping her career into nursing. She now holds lectures on issues related to nursing, healthcare, and the end of life. 

Her new book titled Healing is out now, where she tells a powerful story about navigating healthcare after a breast cancer diagnosis. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS:

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic all the time so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. What made you shift focus from academia to pursue a career in nursing? What made you choose oncology, palliative, and hospice? 
  2. During your first year as an oncology nurse you experienced a sudden death of a patient, how did that make you feel and how did you process those emotions?
  3. Your book Critical Care is an account of your first year as a nurse, what was your biggest take away and how were you able to deal with the emotions and workload of a new nurse?
  4. How different was the reality of nursing compared to your expectations going in? 
    1. What do you think are the most common misconceptions about nursing?
    2. What are the struggles you’ve noticed nurses faced?
  5. Going from nurse to patient, how was it navigating through a healthcare system that you’ve worked in?
    1. What were your first thoughts when you were diagnosed with cancer?
    2. How were you treated? Were physicians and other medical staff transparent and timely? Did you feel that you were getting the appropriate “help’?
    3. Do you feel that you were left in the dark or weren’t given the full picture of your situation?
  6. Being both a patient and a nurse, what would you like to change in healthcare or in nursing? Did healthcare fail you?

ENDING QUESTIONS:

Before we end the show we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody, dead or alive, who would it be & why? 

You can check out Theresa’s book Healing: When a Nurse Becomes a Patient at https://www.theresabrownrn.com/Or stay in touch with her through Twitter @TheresaBrown for more information.

To understand more about the misconceptions about nursing, check out the full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Intro
01:42 What made you shift focus from academia to pursue a career in nursing?
04:55 What made you choose oncology, palliative care, and hospice?
07:34 The biggest takeaway as an oncology nurse
11:26 The struggles of nursing school
14:25 Tips for dealing with emotions after a patient’s death
23:05 Being a cancer patient
28:12 What patients really need from nurses
32:31 Realizations to improve healthcare
36:59 What would you like to change in healthcare or in nursing?
46:34 How does it feel to be out of leadership status?
50:25 Who do you want to have one last cup of coffee with?

 

 

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

Working as a travel nurse is one of the most liberating areas of nursing. You can choose the areas you want to work in and even enjoy the benefits of financially lucrative travel nursing positions. If you are interested in becoming a travel nurse, get to know which areas pay the most.

Nurses can choose almost any specialty area to work in, in the travel healthcare sector. As travel nurses, you will be making more than a staff position in a position or specialty, it is wise to select from some of the highest paying nursing specialties. 

1. Intensive Unite Care Nurse or ICU Nurse

One of the most in-demand areas for travel nurses belongs to the ICU. If you have experience in this department, you are in luck as many hospitals use nurses in the ICU to float around other units because of their broadened skills and knowledge, making them valuable members of the team. ICU nurses are trained to care for the critically ill and have a broad array of skills. As a travel nurse, you too can work in this area as long as you have the skills or experience as an ICU nurse. Most facilities look for at least 1-2 years of experience.

2. Labor and Delivery Nurse 

Nurses who specialize in obstetrics and women’s health, especially in antepartum and postpartum care, are constantly in-demand. L&D nurses are also among the highest-paid nurses in the country, and one of the travel nursing positions with the highest pay. However, before you sign the contract, consider a few things first. While you will be taking care of healthy patients in this area, you must be ready to handle any emergencies that could occur. These may include emergency c-sections and many others. If you are up for the challenge, then this could be a fantastic opportunity for you. 

3. Emergency Room or ER Nurse

Do you enjoy a fast-paced environment while working as a nurse? If you do, then working as an ER nurse is the best place for you. Many travel nurses can work in this department and earn more pay than their staff job. Keep in mind that working in the ER means you have to constantly use your critical thinking skills, so if you love the idea of solving problems, this could be the right place for you. When looking for an ER position it is always good to look at the hospital trauma level, it may be more acute than your used to.

4. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurse or PICU Nurse/ Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or NICU

As a travel nurse, you will have the chance to work with some of the latest technology used in childcare with plenty of nursing opportunities in states like Texas, New York, New Jersey, California, and many others. 

5. Medical-Surgical/Telemetry Nurse

The need for nurses with exceptional skills and knowledge in medical-surgical nursing is in demand these days. Since the number of Covid patients is still elevated, there is always a need for nurses in this area. Travel nurses can apply for this position and earn up to  $5,000/week. If you are a nurse who can handle several patients and can manage time effectively, this could be an excellent opportunity to take.

6. Operating Room Nurse or OR Nurse

One of the most interesting areas and travel nursing positions with the highest pay belongs to the Operating Room. You will be a valuable asset to many hospitals across the country for travel nurses with perioperative skills. If you are certified at a specific OR skill or have a wide range of operating room experience, t you can snag any  OR position, 

In Closing

Consider also the location of the place for your travel nursing assignment. Some states pay higher than others. Now that you know which areas pay travel nurses the most, find a good agency that can get you a position in these areas. It is also an excellent option to do more research on travel nursing before asking for an assignment. That way, you know what to expect and still earn more than staff. 

 

EP 167: Should You Start in a CVICU as a New Grad?

EP 167: Should You Start in a CVICU as a New Grad?

Should You Start in a CVICU as a New Grad?

Start in a CVICU as a new grad? Why not! One of the exciting areas to start working as a nurse is in the Cardiac ICU. The cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit or CVICU is a hospital ward that caters to and cares for patients with ischemic heart disease and other severe heart conditions. 

Patients who suffered a heart attack and need close monitoring are also placed in this unit. The same goes for patients recovering from heart surgery and with other severe conditions like cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, heart infection, or unstable angina. 

Most patients in the CVICU often have various complications such as respiratory failure and renal failure. Therefore, medical staff who work at CVICU are required to have the ability to practice systemic intensive care.

In this episode, we introduce you to one of our followers, James Hatano. James is a New grad nurse in the Cardiac ICU at a Trauma 1 hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. He is also a certified CrossFit coach and a baseball coach. Today we will talk about his new grad experience as a Cardiac ICU nurse. So if you are interested to start in a CVICU as a new grad, this episode is for you. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS:

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic all the time so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. Your BSN is your second degree, you also have a degree in exercise physiology. What made you decide on exercise physiology and then what made you transition into nursing?
    1. Are there some aspects of exercise physiology that have helped you in nursing school, being a nurse, and/or with life in general? 
    2. How did you survive nursing school? What do you think was the key? Time management, good schedule, etc…?
  2. Was the Cardiac ICU something you wanted to get into right off the bat? 
    1. Why did you choose the Cardiac ICU? Do you fit the typical cardiac ICU stereotype? (craziest lives but neatest lines, control, OCD)
  3. Biggest difference between nursing school and the ICU?
    1. What’s something you wished you knew going into school?
    2. What did you struggle with most in school? What do you struggle with most now?
    3. Tips for nurses trying to join the ICU.
  4. Nursing is stressful, we can agree that it is never going to change. No matter if there are appropriate ratios and great morale, working with patients that are very sick you’re always going to have that stress on your shoulders.
    1. What do you do to help balance that stress, do you have any issue with not leaving it at work and bringing it home with you?
  5. You’re big into fitness you’re even one of the top 50 fittest nurses in the world, how has that helped you through life?
    1. How has fitness played a role in your life and how has it helped you with nursing?
    2. How has your exercise changed over time?
  6. The drive podcast by Peter Attia, what got you into it and why do you enjoy it, what do they talk about?
  7. Chop wood, carry water book, would you recommend that book, why and/or to whom?

ENDING QUESTIONS:

Before we end the show we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

You can find James on Instagram @jameshatano to know more about CVICU nursing.

You can also watch the full episode here 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Intro
00:45 Episode Introduction
01:33 About the guest
03:29 James Hatano and nursing
06:46 How does nursing school impact life
09:57 Transitioning out of nursing school
12:17 Life lessons you learned from being a CVICU nurse
13:51 Struggles as a new grad
20:03 Balancing Work and Life
22:15 Managing time
25:03 Managing relationship
30:32 How is it working with a female dominant profession
33:44 What would you like to improve in the healthcare system
37:00 A thing that you always have
39:47 The person outside nursing
43:52 Personal interests
46:34 Who would you want to have the one last cup of coffee?

Ep. 166: Being a Travel Nurse Practitioner With Ebony Thyme

Ep. 166: Being a Travel Nurse Practitioner With Ebony Thyme

Being a Travel Nurse Practitioner With Ebony Thyme

Besides travel nurses, we also have traveling nurse practitioners. What is a traveling nurse practitioner anyway? By definition, they are healthcare professionals who work at a facility away from their home base. They act as immediate and often temporary staffing for healthcare facilities. 

Traveling nurse practitioners often work in senior care centers, hospitals, clinics, stand-alone emergency rooms, urgent care locations, and other healthcare facilities where there is a need for registered nurse practitioners. These facilities could need assistance from an NP because of patient overflow or a full-time employee on an extended leave or have retired.

They are also like travel nurses. The only difference is that a traveling nurse practitioner’s contract can last one day to one year. Meanwhile, travel nurses go on contract for as long as 13 weeks. 

In this episode, we welcome our guest Ebony Thyme, a full-time Travel NP and a full-time wanderlust. A free-spirited individual with eight years of nursing experience. She also worked as a Travel NP in four states and has traveled to more than 30+ countries. Ebony’s background includes Family Medicine. Before her NP journey, she was also an ICU Nurse.

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic all the time so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  • Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
      1. How did you get into nursing?
      2. What made you be ICU?
      3. What made you transition into being a travel nurse practitioner?
  • What made you enter into a traveling career?
      1. What have you learned? 
      2. What was the hardest thing for you to get used to?
      3. Advice to anyone that wants to be a travel RN or NP?
      4. How is the market for travel nurse practitioners? 
        1. What are some of the expectations and responsibilities? 
      5. What was your favorite state to travel to for work?
  • You’ve been to 30 countries, why do you travel so much?
      1. What have you learned from exploring so many cultures? 
      2. How has it expanded your mind and perspective?
      3. How important is it for you to travel and why should people do more traveling?
  • As an NP, how were you able to make your career give you financial freedom and the ability to control where your time goes?
  • What are you currently working on?
    1. NPing around the US?
    2. Travel boot camp? What is it?
    3. Locum Tenen Guide? 
    4. Thyme Talks podcast?

Before we end the show we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

You can catch Ebony on her Instagram accounts at @ebbthenp and @frontpage_eb. For her master class, podcast, and other sites, check out the links below:

If you are interested in becoming a traveling NP, watch the full episode here to learn more 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Intro
02:02 Plugs
02:56 About the Guest
05:27 The difference between Travel Nurse and a Travel NP
09:01 What is transitioning from Nurse to NP look like?
13:15 Advantage of a Nurse Practitioner
15:11 3 tips for nursing students
19:02 The importance of self-care
22:22 Solo traveling experience
24:31 Fears and Expectations
26:11 Difference between living on the east coast and the west coast
29:08 The humbling life in other countries
34:32 Places you should visit
35:35 What kept Ebony busy
39:51 Things I wish I knew earlier in my career
42:10 The worst contract
45:15 Toxic workplace
49:54 Who would you want to have a cup of coffee one last time?

 

 

8 Mistakes That Rookie Travel Nurses Make While on the Job

8 Mistakes That Rookie Travel Nurses Make While on the Job

8 Mistakes That Rookie Travel Nurses Make While on the Job

Working as a travel nurse is one of the best decisions you will ever make in your nursing career. Of course, just like any other newbies, you can’t wait till you are assigned to a different location. While waiting for an assignment, it is best to read about the eight mistakes that rookie travel nurses make so you can avoid doing them in the future. Here’s what you need to know. 

Avoid These While Going Through Your Contract

#1. Skimming through your contract.

It is a big booboo on your part if you do not read your contract thoroughly. Your travel nurse contract is an essential part of your assignment, so any responsible nurse will carefully read through it before signing [1]. Skimming through your contract will place you in a situation that you might not like. 

Before signing, make sure to check for accuracy and completeness. Check also for the assignment, pay rate, dates, travel reimbursements, bonuses, time offs, and other special agreements that you may have. Your agency should be able to answer all your concerns if needed. So, don’t just skim through it; read your contract well!

#2. Being unprepared for your assignment.

As nurses, we are trained to be ready at all times. We can even make boy scouts a run for their money if we talk about preparedness! It is a part of our nurse skills to be alert and ready for anything. However, rookie travel nurses are too complacent about their assignments that they don’t bother preparing – big mistake! They let their excitement get the best of them. Remember, you are traveling for work, not for fun. Be in a work mode mindset as you take on an assignment. While you can still see sights along the way, or maybe during your offs, you still have to be prepared to do your nursing duties. Avoid these mistakes that rookie travel nurses do and you will save yourself from trouble.

Agencies will help you process everything you need – even your license entering a compact state. In short, you have all the help you need. All you have to do is show up on time and make sure that you make a good impression on your first day. Always bring your supporting documents if your supervisor needs them – it will show how responsible you are for a rookie travel nurse!

#3. Bringing too much stuff with you.

The shortest duration of your assignment is around four to eight weeks, with the longest of thirteen weeks. There’s no need to bring too much stuff with you. Bring only the essentials, and make sure you have enough to reuse. If you are assigned to a different state during winter, bring clothes suitable for the weather. Other than that, leave the ones you don’t need during this assignment. Besides, the weeks will fly by, and the next thing you know, you are off to another location again. 

Take note also of the place you are staying. Is it furnished or not? See what is included in your accommodation. This way, you can decide whether to bring other items along or not. 

#4. Not asking questions.

As a travel nurse, you will always be the “new kid” in town. And as much as you want to do your job and go, it is not always the case. Whenever you are assigned to a new facility, be sure to ask the right questions. You need to learn where things are, who you need to call for emergencies, what practices are done, or protocols to follow. Asking these questions will help your survival on each shift. 

Be sure to make new friends too. Sure, you are the extra hand, but it won’t hurt if you greet people and be friendly. After all, you work in the same facility. Besides, having new friends broadens your network. So, do not hesitate to be nice to everyone you meet along the way. You will need guidance and help as you go. 

#5. Acting like you are not part of the team.

Sure, you may be a temporary nurse extending help, but that does not mean you should also exclude yourself from others. Staff nurses will expect you to do your best. Showing up on time and doing your duties are essential, but you are not hired to work there to separate yourself. 

Try to be a part of the team, be nice to people, be prepared, and do your part. If you work like you are part of the team, your coworkers will treat you the same. Don’t be a total stranger. 

#6. Acting like you know it all.

Another mistake that rookie travel nurses make is acting like they don’t need help from anyone. Being a know-it-all is something you should avoid. Sure, you have the skills and knowledge, but ignoring protocols and not following the standard procedures in the facility you are working in is a huge mistake. 

Take time to listen and learn from your coworkers. It does not matter how long you have been a travel nurse or new to the job. Being open to suggestions and learning the trade is vital if you want to keep your job. Besides, learning new skills will only strengthen your ability as a nurse. Once you have shown that you are valuable to the team, you might find your coworkers asking for your input. 

#7. Joining the hospital drama.

One mistake that rookie travel nurses make is by joining the hospital politics during their brief stay [2]. As a result, they found themselves tangled with the drama that they could’ve avoided in the first place. 

As tempting as juicy gossip can be, avoid engaging in it. Remember, you are only working in this facility for a few weeks. It is always better to build strong relationships than to be part of the gossip crew. Besides, you don’t know the people involved or the whole story, so why bother becoming a part of it? So, do what you came to do, avoid gossiping, and focus on your patient care. You will be appreciated more!

#8. Working hard or hardly working.

Last but not least, one of the mistakes that rookie travel nurses make is working too much or too little. As a nurse, your work is a priority, but you can become a workaholic when you work too much and don’t pause to breathe. So find time to balance work and recreation. One of the reasons you became a travel nurse is to see other places, so do it! Take a look at your schedule and plan an activity for the day. While you are assigned a job, why not take the opportunity to see places? Knowing when to work and have fun has its perks. Besides, after a long day of serving patients, a breather sounds about right. So, enjoy the moments while you can! 

Find Balance on Your First Job

Becoming a travel nurse is exciting, primarily if you are assigned to a place that you haven’t been to before. But as you do, find balance in your work and play. Be mindful of your ways, be presentable, arrive on time, and leave work at work. Over time, you will enjoy each assignment, and you don’t have to make the same mistakes rookie travel nurses make! Being a nurse is a rewarding job, and for you to deliver quality care, you must also take care of yourself. Hopefully, this list cleared it out for you. Best of luck!