7 Attainable Goals for Your Nursing Career

7 Attainable Goals for Your Nursing Career

7 Attainable Goals for Your Nursing Career

Nursing is an incredible career with rewarding rewards. You’ll meet all kinds of people and work in different fields. But it would be best if you had nursing career goals in mind. Remember, you will not be working in this field for the rest of your life. Set goals, work on them, and achieve them. 

Why should you have career goals?

Having your first nursing job is exciting. And while it is good to have a job, you must also have career goals. Why? Career goals help you stay focused. It will keep you from getting stuck on a cycle where everything looks and feels the same. Goals are your finish lines. They make your job more exciting. It gives you something to look forward to, steps to follow, and progress to make. 

As a nurse, your career goals may vary. But as you go through these goals, be sure to have achievable ones. What kind of career goals should you have as a nurse? Here’s what you need to know.

#1. Having an Advance Degree is a Plus

Furthering your career is always a wise decision. Advancing your career in nursing can boost your resume, increase job opportunities and security, and even help you earn more money. An Associate’s Degree is good but consider working towards your Bachelor’s Degree. It will allow you to work in magnet-status hospitals and offer you management positions. It will also open doors for leadership positions in nursing administration and management. That said, a Master’s Degree of Science in Nursing is helpful to have. 

Advanced practices are also an excellent option to take. This path requires you to have either a Master’s or a Ph.D. It will also give you more one-on-one care relationships with your patients. 

Choosing any specialty is one advantage of having a higher or advanced nursing practice. It will also give you better hours and a pay raise. Sometimes, nurses in this field become physician’s assistants or even pursue being a doctor. The most common paths for advanced practices are:

  • Nurse practitioner 
  • Nurse Anesthetist 
  • Nurse Midwife 
  • Physician Assistant

#2. Upgrade Your Nursing Certifications

As your nursing career grows, so should your certifications. Certifications are helpful in all stages of your nursing career. Whether you are new or already working as a nurse, this could put you in a good position. It will also give you an advantage over other candidates, especially when applying for a particular area you are interested in.

If you aim to work in a specialty area like ICU or other intensive care units, increasing your knowledge and credentials is the best way to do it. 

Be always on the lookout for ways to increase your knowledge. Specific certifications can also increase your competency as a nurse, and the more knowledge and skills you have, the more valuable you are. 

Many hospitals offer classes in-house for nurses who wish to obtain advanced certifications. All you have to do is sign up and start your journey from there. 

#3. Volunteer to boost your career

There is a constant need for nurses to volunteer all the time. Many clinics, hospitals, and other facilities need the help of volunteer nurses both in the United States and abroad. This is the best time to do some volunteer work. Nurses who volunteer internationally are highly appreciated in developing countries. There is a greater need for them in countries that need medical help. 

The excellent news about volunteering is you can start doing them even as a nursing student. As a registered nurse, volunteering can help boost your career. It is also a gratifying experience that no textbook or classroom can teach you. So, list volunteering as one of your career goals in the nursing field. You may enjoy it in the future. 

#4. Learn advanced technologies

The use of medical technology is constantly evolving, and nurses working in medical fields must adapt to these changes. These technologies could be portable patient monitors or telehealth services – all used to create, update or access patient files. Nurses must learn to use these technologies; mastering them can benefit your career in many ways. 

How can you stay updated with advanced technologies? For one, you can read free blogs for nurses. There are also many apps that nurses can use and familiarize themselves with the latest technologies used in patient care. Subscribing to journals and magazines for nurses is also helpful. They keep nurses updated with the latest technologies in healthcare. If you want to take it a step further, joining professional organizations for nurses can also help you. 

#5. Specialize in a specific nursing field

Nurses are the Jack of All Trades in this industry, but it is always wise to master one trade. There must be a reason why you decided to be a nurse. Maybe a family member inspired you to be one, or you have a passion for working with children. Either way, having a specialization helps you advance your career. If you are thinking of an area to specialize in, consider the following:

  • Ambulatory care
  • Cardiovascular 
  • Dialysis 
  • Gastroenterology
  • Geriatrics 
  • Holistic care
  • Infection control and prevention
  • Medical-surgical
  • Neonatal 
  • Neuroscience
  • Obstetrics 
  • Oncology 
  • Orthopedics 
  • Pediatrics or children’s healthcare
  • Psychiatric or mental health care

#6. Improve your communication skills

Nurses must communicate well with patients, families, and colleagues. And improving your communication skills can boost your career and growth as a professional nurse. 

Strong communication skills can boost patient health outcomes and enhance professional relationships with co-workers, patients, and their families. But beyond oral and written communication, nurses must also be good at active listening. It is your job to care for patients, take orders/directions from doctors and be part of a nursing team. 

Effective communication also includes patient education, compassion, awareness of people’s cultures, and presentation skills. 

#7. Climb the professional ladder

You can stay as a bedside nurse or change your career path. If you want to step away from bedside nursing, you can do that, but you can start small and work your way up. Start with a charge nurse position. As a charge nurse, you can handle different patient issues and are resourceful. You will also manage nursing staff, create shift schedules, and solve disputes during your shift. These roles are your precursor role in becoming a unit manager. 

Unit managers must have at least five years of nursing experience and administrative work. Sometimes, hospitals may require a bachelor’s or a master’s degree to qualify. 

Administrative positions remove nurses from the bedside and direct patient care, but big pay raises and banker’s hours come with that. If you want a thriving nursing career in the future, consider aiming for such a position. It will be an excellent option to keep open. Hopefully, these tips will help you reach your goals for your nursing career. 

 

7 Study Habits That Work for Nursing Students

7 Study Habits That Work for Nursing Students

7 Study Habits That Work for Nursing Students

As a nursing student, most of your time will be spent studying. That said, you must have study habits that work for nursing students like you. How can you do that? This post can help you with that. 

Study Habits That Work for Nursing Students

The key to your success as a nursing student is your study habits. How you study can impact your grades, performance at school, and test scores which can determine your nursing knowledge. 

Tip #1. Break your work into smaller sections.

Studies show that retaining information is a lot easier when you break your notes into different parts. It makes it easier to move between body systems as you create links between topics. This method makes it quicker to understand the topic you want to study. 

Tip #2. Study with other people.

Studying with a group of people is beneficial for comprehensive medical information. It is helpful if you have difficulty understanding or retaining a particular subject [1]. Some students better grasp such topics, and studying with them can also help you. 

Tip #3. Study for a few hours each day.

Studying all of your subjects in one sitting is not a good idea. One of the nursing qualities of a good nursing student is being organized. That said, organizing your time to study and breaks can help you in many ways. Take time to learn at least one topic at a time each day. Breaking them into smaller parts is also crucial so you don’t feel overwhelmed by them.  

Tip #4. Find a new place to study.

According to research, one of the study habits that works well for nursing students is to change their study locations. It can help improve your test scores and even increase your grade point average in the long run. Finding a new place to study gives your brain an edge to help retain more information. 

Tip #5. Stick to a study schedule.

Sticking to regular study time can better help you understand your nursing subjects. There is no standard timeframe for studying. Both are fine whether you like to do it in the morning or at night. Just make sure you can focus on your subjects better. It would be best to stay committed to the schedule you choose. It will also keep you accountable in the long run. 

Tip #6. Find your learning style.

Knowing your study style will help you study better. It is one of the study habits that work for nursing students. Are you a visual learner? Gather pictures that could help you understand better. Perhaps you are an audio learner? Listen to podcasts and audiobooks about the nursing topics that you’re studying. Knowing your study style can improve your learning and not waste your time. 

Tip #7. Don’t forget to take breaks.

Studying is excellent, and if you want to pass nursing school with flying colors, it is the way to go. However, spending too much time with your studying can also be exhausting. Do take some time out every once in a while. Regular breaks can help you not lose your enthusiasm while studying, and a change of scenery can help recharge your mind and improve your attention [2]. 

In Closing

Completing your nursing school and earning that degree takes a lot of effort and commitment. However, you can achieve that with the right plan, study style, and approach. Hopefully, the tips listed above can help you with all that. Best of luck! 

 

EP 194: Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

EP 194: Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is a recognized alternative in managing selected cases of acute respiratory failure. It is a form of mechanical support where positive pressure delivers a mixture of oxygen and air through the respiratory tree using a noninvasive interface. It could be through standard ICU ventilators or portable devices. Now, if this is something new to you and you want to learn about NPPV, this episode is for you. 

For this episode, we would like to introduce you to Aurika Savickaite. Aurika has worked as a registered nurse and patient care manager at the University of Chicago Medical Center’s Medical Intensive Care Unit. Aurika was involved in successfully testing the helmet ventilator in the ICU at the University of Chicago during a three-year trial study.

In the episode, we focus on the benefits of helmet-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on patient outcomes. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a little background about yourself?
  2. What is Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV), and what are some typical examples of this you see at the hospital?
  3. What made you decide to be involved in creating helmet-based ventilation?
    • What exactly is it? 
    • Can you explain the product and how it works?
  4. How does helmet-based ventilation compare to our current noninvasive positive pressure ventilation? 
    •  What is the cost difference?
    • Can it lead to fewer intubations? 
  5. How have the helmets been working out in New Zealand? 
  6. You’re a problem solver at heart. Are there any other things you are working to improve? Inside or outside of the healthcare setting? 

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Links: 

Website:
https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/ 

YouTube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO8Tfe2OXZuRdNIblSZIZyQ/videos 

Infographics: https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/post/infographic-comparison-bubble-helmet-hood-niv-face-mask-invasive-mechanical-ventilation 

Online training course:
https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/online-course 

Links to two articles mentioned in the podcast:
https://annalsofintensivecare.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13613-022-01069-7
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0964339722001380

Learn more about Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in this full episode 👇👇👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:15 About Aurika Savickaite
04:35 How does a ventilation helmet look like
08:28 The cons of using the facemask
12:07 Why does a patient needs positive pressure ventilation
17:55 The advantage of using the helmet interface over the facemask
25:39 Helmet interface has lesser chances of intubation
30:14 Is there a noise issue with the helmet?
33:50 How has the helmet helped the world
38:38 Embracing Innovations to improving patient care
43:31 To much technology is not always better
48:16 Improving patient care should start with nurses
55:25 Other things that interest Aurika
01:01:12 Wrapping up the show

EP 193: The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

EP 193: The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

The View From The Abortion Clinic With Patrice D’Amato

The view from the abortion clinic paints a different story. It’s where decisions are made, often for a good cause. But can women have an abortion without being judged? That is the real question.

What is Abortion? 

Abortion is defined as a procedure to end a pregnancy. It is also known as the termination of pregnancy through medications or surgical procedures. All around the world, 73 million induced abortions take place each year. Among 6 out of 10 or 61% of these abortions, are unintended pregnancies, while the remaining 21% ended as induced abortions. All abortions are 45% unsafe, and 97% occur in developing countries. 

Unsafe abortion is one of the leading but preventable causes of maternal morbidities and deaths. It also affects the physical and mental health and financial and social burdens of many women in many communities. 

As nurses, what can we do to help women who want to go through an abortion? Do we have the right to refuse to take care of patients who went through an abortion based on moral objection? And when will abortion be normalized in our society? These are the questions we must answer. 

Our Guest for Today’s Episode

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Patrice D’Amato. Patrice is a nurse, educator, and author of a new book, The View from the Clinic: One Nurse’s Journey in Abortion Care. She has practiced nursing in various settings in her 38-year nursing career, including med/Surg, critical care, nursing education, and women’s health. After earning her Master’s degree in Adult Health, she worked as an NP in several abortion clinics and 20 years later returned to the field while writing her book about her experiences.

QUESTIONS FOR OUR GUEST

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

We are looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a little background about yourself? 
  2. Working in healthcare for over 30 years, what have you seen over time? 
    • How has nursing evolved or changed?
    • Have you seen a more significant connection to the mind/body/spirit approach vs. just medical treatment?
  3. How was it working in an abortion clinic?
    • How has it changed over time?
  4. Did your perspective or opinion change on abortions while working with them?
  5. Was it hard for you to work in that setting? What made you gravitate toward it? 
  6. One of the counterarguments for legalizing abortion has been its potential intent to be used as a contraceptive. Were there any “frequent fliers”?
  7. Did you get the opportunity to find out why women are getting abortions? If so, what was the most common reason?
  8. You wrote a book titled; The View from the Clinic: One Nurse’s Journey in Abortion Care. What made you decide to write it?
    • What do you outline or focus on in the book?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Links: 

Book: www.theviewfromtheclinic.com 

To watch and learn more about abortion, click here for the entire episode 👇👇👇

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:58 About Patrice D’Amato
04:28 How has nursing evolved or changed?
06:50 How was it working in an abortion clinic?
11:03 Thoughts on abortion
11:47 What is a medical abortion
13:04 How a surgical abortion procedure looks
15:52 Perspective on abortion
18:02 Spirituality and abortion
21:20 How Patrice deals with guilt
24:16 Relief after an abortion
26:41 abortion and the patient’s mental health
29:16 Cases of abuse and unwanted pregnancy
31:21 The future of abortion
34:48 The fetus worship
40:37 Probirth v.s Pro-life
42:12 Generational traumas
46:11 Rewiring your system
48:58 Wrapping up the episode

EP 191: Nursing Negligence & HIPPA with Irnise Williams

EP 191: Nursing Negligence & HIPPA with Irnise Williams

Nursing Negligence & HIPPA with Irnise Williams

Nursing negligence is when a nurse fails to do or perform minimum nursing care within the standards of conduct, which results in loss or harm. It can also result from a failure of the nurse to perform their duties or when it is done incorrectly.

While this rarely happens, it is still something that all nurses must be aware of. The lives of our patients are in our hands, it is vital that we are always conscious and mindful of our job and duties as members of the healthcare team. 

Our Guest

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Irnise Williams. Irnise is an experienced nurse and now an attorney. She has a vast amount of knowledge when it comes to healthcare law. Irnise has advocated for and trained thousands of healthcare providers to work within their scope of practice. She has also worked with over 100 businesses helping them operate and stay protected by creating systems, solutions, and success through her 5-step framework. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a background about yourself? 
  2. From a legal standpoint, what can nurses get in trouble for?
  3. What kind of cases do you see most that involve nurses, physicians, or any healthcare professionals?
  4. What is malpractice from a healthcare professional standpoint?
    • What is your experience with malpractice cases?
    • Should every nurse have malpractice insurance?
  5. Other than malpractice insurance, how should nurses protect their licenses?
  6. What Potential Legal Ramifications Do Nurses Face?
  7. What should you do as a healthcare professional to avoid getting sued?
  8. Have HIPPA laws changed at all?
    • How is social media use affected by HIPPA law in the workplace? 
    • Can we talk about nursing stories outside of the hospital setting? 
  9. What is the 66-day business Bootcamp you offer?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Learn more about Nursing Negligence & HIPPA by watching the full episode here! 👇😎

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:50 About Irnise Williams
05:19 The reason why Irnise went to law school
07:30 Transitioning from being a nurse to running a law firm
11:31 What you should do to avoid getting into trouble
14:08 Things that nurses may be held accountable for in court
20:52 The difference between negligence and malpractice
22:46 HIPPA Violations
28:29 Information you shouldn’t post on social media
30:31 Can a healthcare provider sue a hospital
33:52 Does healthcare provider need malpractice insurance
35:06 Other services Irnise can provide
36:47 Legal tips for nursepreneurs
38:31 Responsibilities and liabilities of a travel agency
41:26 Wrapping up the show