EP 200: Understanding Your Body Language With Kelly Love

EP 200: Understanding Your Body Language With Kelly Love

EP 200: Understanding Your Body Language With Kelly Love

Your body language is essential to your well-being, but do you know when your body speaks? Psychosomatic bodywork is an approach that combines different techniques that are rooted in guiding a person to reach their goals through different therapies. Among these include talk therapy, breathwork, and movement. It also includes somatic-emotional awareness and trauma release to reclaim one’s energy and physical presence.

Psychosomatic bodywork works by tapping into mind and body communication. It focuses on this connection so the therapist can work toward physical and emotional healing. In a way, it is possible to heal the mind and the body through the mind. But how does this truly work? Is it possible to adapt this in our everyday life?

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Kelly Love. Kelly is a rewilding coach guiding you back to the truth of what your soul came here to do, be, and express through the body’s wisdom. Kelly uses transformative psychosomatic bodywork to help achieve physical and emotional healing. 

Questions for Our Guest

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Please give us a little background about yourself. 
  2. What is the language of the body? 
  3. How can we use the body’s language to live aligned with our soul’s purpose?
  4. Can you hear what pain and trauma you store in your body?
  5. How can nurses use body Language to understand their patients?
    • How does this body language allow us to treat the root cause of disease to better care for our patients?  
  6. Tell us how you help patients heal. 
  7. Where can people find you?

Matts’s Experience with Body Language 

The left pectoral muscle is also lower than the right, speaking again into the feminine heart energy being drained out, exhausted, or having challenges encouraging and uplifting your own heart.

This is your solar plexus, and when the elbows are turned out, it signifies a history of giving away your power. Imagine a young boy with his arms out asking, “How much more do I have to give you for you to love me?

LOWER BACK: More hollowing shows a long history of busting your back to please/care for others vs. caring for your own needs and desires.

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be and why? 

Enjoy Kelly’s services and use our code CUPOFNURSES10, which is suitable for any service of $500 or more. To know more about Kelly, send her a DM thru her socials or visit her website at:

www.KellyLoveRewilding.com

Join her Group coaching program Soul Much Love at KellyLoveRewilding.com/SoulMuchLove

Connect with Kelly through her Instagram at @KellyLoveRewilding 

Do you want to learn about your body language? Watch the full episode by clicking here 👇👇👇

 

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:35 About Kelly Love
03:26 How Kelly learned about the relationship between the body and emotions
07:31 How does body language impair our physical state?
11:56 How emotions impact particular body parts
13:41 Body language as a two-way system
15:37 How does the condition of our patients affect us as nurses?
21:31 How to tell if there is a medical or mental problem
25:56 How can a nurse give their patient greater care?
27:49 Common issues that most people have
29:42 How Kelly treats her patients
32:36 How can you heal yourself
33:42 A recurring theme in Kelly’s client
38:13 What should women do during their period?
41:49 Wrapping up the episode

EP 199: The Renal System and RAAS

EP 199: The Renal System and RAAS

The Renal System

The renal system produces, stores, and eliminates urine. Kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from the blood. Urine travels from the kidneys through two thin tubes called ureters and fills the bladder. When the bladder is full of urine, a person urinates through the urethra to eliminate the waste.

Functions of the Kidneys

The kidneys are located on either side of the spine at the lowest level of the rib cage, consisting of the functional unit called a nephron. 

There are about one million nephrons in each kidney; these nephrons consist of tiny blood vessels called glomerulus attached to a tubule. 

When blood enters the glomerulus, it is filtered, and the remaining fluid passes to the tubule. In the tubule, minerals, elements, chemicals, and water are absorbed or filtered according to the body’s needs to create the final product, urine.

Our kidneys maintain a delicate balance of water and electrolytes in the body and remove excessive waste:

  • Remove wastes, urea, and ammonia, from the blood.
  • Maintain fluid status balance in the body by holding or retaining water and releasing and removing water from the bloodstream
  • It maintains the electrolyte balance of the blood.
  • Maintain acid-base/pH balance of the blood
  • Assist with endocrine functions such as the production of erythropoietin and calcitriol.
    • It is needed to produce red blood cells and calcium reabsorption, respectively.
  • Produce the enzyme renin
    • Help regulate blood pressure.
  • Convert vitamin D into its active form

Fun Fact: 

  • Every 24 hours, your kidney filters 200 quarts of fluid. About two quarts are removed from the body, and 198 quarts are returned to the bloodstream. 
  • The right kidney sits lower than the left kidney. 
    • It helps accommodate the large size of the liver, right above the right kidney.
  • We call it REabsorption rather the just absorption because the substances filtered from the glomerulus were already absorbed through the GI tract and taken into the bloodstream. Then the substances travel through the body via the heart and are sent to the kidneys through the renal artery to be filtered out. Therefore, our body reabsorbs these nutrients based on their needs, and the leftovers are excreted in the urine.

Anatomy of the Kidney

As a nurse and a nursing student, you’ll need to know these most critical parts of the kidney to understand how the renal system works.

Renal Capsule 

  • The outer layer of the kidney protects the kidney from outside organ infections. 

Renal cortex: 

  • A layer outside contains the renal corpuscles, which house the glomerulus and Bowman’s capsule, whose primary functions are to FILTER the urine and renal tubules. 

Renal medulla: 

  • The inside layer is located within the renal pyramids. It is hypertonic and very salty. Along with the nephron, these conditions help maintain water and salt balance in our body, specifically the Loop of Henle.

Renal artery:  

  • The renal artery takes oxygenated blood from the heart and moves it to the kidney to be filtered. It branches off around the renal columns into the renal cortex, into arterioles, and finally to the peritubular capillaries.

Renal vein:

  • The renal veins take filtered blood to heart for re-oxygenation and are pumped throughout the body. It comes from the efferent arterioles.

Renal pyramids: 

  • Lie Within the renal medulla contains the loop of Henle and parts of the collecting tubule.

Renal papilla, minor and significant calyx:

  • Pointed projections of the renal pyramid play a role in draining urine along with the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Nephrons: 

  • The functional part of the kidneys. 
  • Filters the blood via the renal corpuscle
  • Reabsorbs minerals/water and secretes waste via the renal tubule
  • Produces urine which drains down into the ureters, is stored in the bladder, and voided out via the urethra.
  • Each nephron is composed of 
    • Renal corpuscle (glomerulus within Bowman’s capsule)
    • Proximal tubule
    • An intermediate tubule (loop of Henle)
    • A distal convoluted tubule, a connecting tubule, and cortical, outer medullary, and inner medullary collecting ducts.

Glomerulus:

  • Lies within the nephron
  • Circular capillaries that have incredibly high pressure helps perform ULTRAFILTRATION.

Bowman’s capsule

  • Forms a cup-like sack around the glomerulus
  • It helps the glomerulus filter blood 

The Nephron and blood supply

Blood enters the afferent arteriole and sends blood to the first part of the nephron, called the glomerulus.

In the glomerulus, blood will be filtered, and filtrate will be created, a liquid consisting of the collection of fluid and particles from the blood. The filtrate will “drip” down into a capsule surrounding the glomerulus called Bowman’s capsule.

  • Bowman’s capsule collects the filtrate.
    • Water, NA, CL, CA, K, Mg, Phos, Bicarb, amino acids, glucose, creatinine, and urea.

Then the filtered blood exits via the efferent arterioles to the peritubular capillaries surrounding the nephrons. 

Peritubular capillaries carry the reabsorbed nutrients from the filtrate back into the body’s system to the renal vein. They secrete urea, ions, and drugs in the blood into the tubules.

The created filtrate then flows through the proximal convoluted tubule (PCT); here, the tubule reabsorbs most of the parts of the filtrate that we need to function that just came from the Bowman’s capsule.

Then the filtrate enters the Loop of Henle; we are now in the renal medulla. The loop of Henle has a descending limb and ascending limb. Its goal is to concentrate the urine via the renal medulla. The renal medulla’s interstitial fluid is hypertonic, helping reabsorb water from the filtrate to maintain the body’s water and salt balance.

  • Descending limb is only permeable to water.
  • Ascending limb is only permeable to ions.

The filtrate then enters the distal convoluted tubule, where more substances are reabsorbed and secreted. 

Then it travels to the collecting tubule, where parts of the filtrate are reabsorbed. Finally, the filtrate leaves the collecting tubule as urine which flow through the renal papilla, minor/major calyx, renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Kidney and Blood Pressure Management 

The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is the system of hormones, proteins, enzymes, and reactions that regulate your blood pressure and blood volume long-term.

It regulates your blood pressure by increasing sodium (salt) reabsorption, water reabsorption (retention), and vascular tone (the degree to which your blood vessels constrict or narrow). The RAAS consists of three major substances including:

  • Renin (an enzyme).
  • Angiotensin II (a hormone).
  • Aldosterone (a hormone).

RAAS System

  • Increases blood pressure when it drops too low by activating Angiotensin II
    • Angiotensin II increases vasoconstriction, causing an increase in blood pressure. Conserves sodium and water to increase volume. Aldosterone and ADH are released. 
  • RAAS steps
  1. Blood pressure drops too low. 
  2. The sympathetic nervous system sends nerve impulses to Juxtaglomerular Cells in the kidneys to release RENIN.
  3. RENIN present in the blood will activate ANGIOTENSINOGEN in the liver.
  4. ANGIOTENSINOGEN then turns into ANGIOTENSIN I causing a release of ACE
  5. ACE is Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme. ACE converts Angiotensin I into ANGIOTENSIN II
  6. ANGIOTENSIN II activation will cause
  7. Vasoconstriction
    • Increases systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and blood pressure.
  1. Increase Blood Volume
      • Kidneys will keep water and sodium.
      • The adrenal cortex gland will be triggered by angiotensin II to release aldosterone. Aldosterone will also cause the kidneys to keep sodium and water and excrete potassium.
    • Angiotensin II triggers the pituitary gland to release ADH. It causes the kidneys to keep water.

2. Increased blood pressure

To learn more about the renal system, click here for the full episode 👇👇👇

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:10 The functional parts of the kidney
03:18 What does a kidney do
04:40 Kidney fun facts
05:40 Anatomy of the kidney
10:00 The nephron and blood supply
15:48 Kidney and blood pressure management
17:39 How the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) works
21:50 Further views on the episode
24:02 Wrapping up the show

 

 

EP 197: How to Optimize Brain Function and Promote Neuroplasticity with Nicole Vignola

EP 197: How to Optimize Brain Function and Promote Neuroplasticity with Nicole Vignola

How to Optimize Brain Function and Promote Neuroplasticity with Nicole Vignola

The ability of the brain to adapt and change due to experience is called neuroplasticity. This umbrella term refers to the brain’s ability to change, grow neural networks, and reorganize. It can involve functional changes due to structural changes while you’re learning or can be altered due to brain damage. How does neuroplasticity affect us in the long run? And how can we develop it to help optimize our brain function better?

Our Guest 

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Nicole Vignola. Nicole is a neuroscientist that focuses on cognitive neuroscience that investigates high-risk decision-making. Her previous research drew upon adult synaptic plasticity, whereby she reconstructed a section of the adult mouse somatosensory cortex using computer-based analytics to explore the wiring diagram of the human brain. This served as a springboard for further interest and research into the plasticity of mindset change and how these principles can be adopted into everyday living.

Nicole is also a business owner and entrepreneur who coaches individuals and consults with organizations on brain health, longevity, mindset change, and optimization using science-based evidence.

Questions for our Guest

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a little background about yourself?
  2. What are your previous research experiences?
  3. What is optimal brain health everyone should be aware of?
    • How do you optimize your brain for maximal performance? 
  4. Talk to us about the neuroplasticity of mindset change. How can you adopt the principles into everyday life?
  5. What are science-based methods for mental resilience and managing burnout? 
  6. What happens in the default mode network? 
  7. Knowing everything about brain and mental health, what does your day-to-day routines? 

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Links: 

Connect with Nicole on Instagram and learn more about how our brain works at @nicoleneuroscience

Or visit her website at https://www.nicolesneuroscience.com/

Here’s how you can benefit from changing your mindset, watch this full episode 👇👇👇

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:11 About Nicole Vignola
03:35 How to enhance judgment under pressure
10:21 Does the brain react differently to physical stress compared to emotional stress?
12:40 The positive effects of sleep
14:04 The optimal sleep cycle for enhancing mental health
20:31 Actions you can take to sharpen your brainpower
25:10 Do cold baths and marijuana aid in sleep?
28:08 Tips on improving cognitive function
29:03 Does alcohol aid in sleep?
30:00 How neuroplasticity works
34:55 How long does it take for someone to form a habit?
36:53 Neuroplasticity versus addiction
40:18 Tips for developing mental strength
44:06 Amazing cognitive benefits of exercising
50:51 Where does consciousness comes from
52:11 Wrapping up the show

EP 194: Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

EP 194: Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation with Aurika Savickaite

Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is a recognized alternative in managing selected cases of acute respiratory failure. It is a form of mechanical support where positive pressure delivers a mixture of oxygen and air through the respiratory tree using a noninvasive interface. It could be through standard ICU ventilators or portable devices. Now, if this is something new to you and you want to learn about NPPV, this episode is for you. 

For this episode, we would like to introduce you to Aurika Savickaite. Aurika has worked as a registered nurse and patient care manager at the University of Chicago Medical Center’s Medical Intensive Care Unit. Aurika was involved in successfully testing the helmet ventilator in the ICU at the University of Chicago during a three-year trial study.

In the episode, we focus on the benefits of helmet-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on patient outcomes. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Can you give us a little background about yourself?
  2. What is Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV), and what are some typical examples of this you see at the hospital?
  3. What made you decide to be involved in creating helmet-based ventilation?
    • What exactly is it? 
    • Can you explain the product and how it works?
  4. How does helmet-based ventilation compare to our current noninvasive positive pressure ventilation? 
    •  What is the cost difference?
    • Can it lead to fewer intubations? 
  5. How have the helmets been working out in New Zealand? 
  6. You’re a problem solver at heart. Are there any other things you are working to improve? Inside or outside of the healthcare setting? 

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Links: 

Website:
https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/ 

YouTube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO8Tfe2OXZuRdNIblSZIZyQ/videos 

Infographics: https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/post/infographic-comparison-bubble-helmet-hood-niv-face-mask-invasive-mechanical-ventilation 

Online training course:
https://www.helmetbasedventilation.com/online-course 

Links to two articles mentioned in the podcast:
https://annalsofintensivecare.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13613-022-01069-7
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0964339722001380

Learn more about Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in this full episode 👇👇👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:15 About Aurika Savickaite
04:35 How does a ventilation helmet look like
08:28 The cons of using the facemask
12:07 Why does a patient needs positive pressure ventilation
17:55 The advantage of using the helmet interface over the facemask
25:39 Helmet interface has lesser chances of intubation
30:14 Is there a noise issue with the helmet?
33:50 How has the helmet helped the world
38:38 Embracing Innovations to improving patient care
43:31 To much technology is not always better
48:16 Improving patient care should start with nurses
55:25 Other things that interest Aurika
01:01:12 Wrapping up the show

EP 178: How to Take Care of Your Skin With Laura Coral

EP 178: How to Take Care of Your Skin With Laura Coral

How to Take Care of Your Skin With Laura Coral

How you take care of your skin plays a role in your self-esteem. When you have beautiful skin, you also have self-confidence. Unfortunately, some of us don’t know how to care for our skin. As a result, some of us suffer from acne, blackheads, dryness of the skin, skin lesions, and other skin conditions. 

But how do you take care of your skin correctly anyway? Is showering enough? What about a skincare routine? Is there a specific way to achieve great skin?

If you suffer from bad skin, this episode is for you. In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Laura Coral. Laura is a dermatology physician assistant working at Curology and branching off to YouTube and social media to share her experience being a PA and encourage future healthcare providers to go after their dreams!

We will discuss the best skin care routines and how to decrease acne and wrinkles. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. Laura can you give us a little background about yourself and how you got started in dermatology?
    • Did you go straight into PA school, or did you start off somewhere else in the healthcare field?
    • Have you always worked in dermatology? 
  2. How did you get started in Curology? 
    • Why do you like the company, and how do they personalized skincare?
  3. What are the most common skin issues you see and common ways to treat them? Dry skin, acne, pigmentation issues, etc.
  4. What are some common skin myths or misconceptions?
    • Common questions your clients ask?
    • What ages the skin and causes wrinkles? 
      1. Are there some universal products out there that can help with aging? 
  5. Do you have a skincare routine?
    • What skin products can you not live without? 
    • What are some universal products that you think everyone should use?
  6. Psychosomatic manifestations are something we’ve been curious about. It shows how powerful our mind is and the destruction we can cause to ourselves. Have you had any experience with psychosomatic disorders? 
    • A big culprit of this is unaddressed conflicts that linger on for years. How can people get over this? 
    • Psychosomatic disorder is a psychological condition involving the occurrence of physical symptoms, usually lacking a medical explanation. People with this condition may have excessive thoughts, feelings, or concerns about the symptoms.

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Connect with Laura through her Instagram at @thecoralbrief or subscribe to her YouTube Channel for more skin care tips at www.youtube.com/c/LauraCoralPAC.

Do you want to have healthy skin? Learn helpful tips by watching this full episode 👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:48 About the guest
04:01 How did you get started in Curology?
05:35 Difference between face and body skin
06:42 What products to avoid
09:06 Basic skincare routine
11:20 Difference between serums, creams, and lotions
14:19 The skincare routine for you
17:05 Is applying sunscreen necessary?
21:58 Wrinkles and retinol
24:20 What causes acne?
31:44 Skincare and makeup
34:03 Laura’s skincare routine
36:10 What is a dark spot?
38:36 Scar treatments
42:19 Psychosomatic disorder
47:26 Talking about insecurities
50:02 Managing Stress
51:10 Can eyebags be treated
52:59 Wrapping up the episode