Should You Volunteer as a Student Nurse?

Should You Volunteer as a Student Nurse?

Should You Volunteer as a Student Nurse?

Volunteering gives you the chance to experience what it is like to work as a real nurse. It allows you to see if it is indeed the right path for you. So should you volunteer as a student nurse? 

What to Consider When Volunteering

As a student nurse, your time is preoccupied with a lot of things in nursing school. However, if you want to gain experience in nursing, signing up as a volunteer can help you in many ways. So what should you consider before giving it a shot? 

Consider the time you give

When you volunteer, you are adding more responsibilities to your plate. It could lead to more problems in the future and might even affect your school performance and grades. 

Before you volunteer, consider how much time you are willing to give into it. Remember, your commitment is needed when you volunteer for something. It will also show on record how trustworthy you are with the opportunity granted to you. 

Your reasons for volunteering

What are your reasons for volunteering? If you know why you are volunteering, then all is well. Although there is no concrete reason why people volunteer sometimes, it is still best to narrow down why you want to volunteer. And once you know why you can prioritize the things you would like to pursue. 

The requirements needed

Keep in mind that not all volunteer opportunities are the same. Some may ask for minimal requirements, while others might require you to train first before they accept you. Before volunteering, it is best to check the conditions first to see if you fit the part or not. It will save you time and effort.

The responsibilities

Before volunteering, you should also consider the responsibilities that it comes with. As a student nurse volunteer, you will be dealing with patients and nurse staff, so quitting once the odds are not in your favor is not an easy option. You must see through it before you say no. 

Should You Volunteer as a Student Nurse? YES!

Now that you know the things to consider, here’s why you should do it:

Networking opportunities

As a volunteer, you have the chance to reach out to other nurses and student nurses alike. Get to know the people you work with when you volunteer. You might be working with the best people in the healthcare field. Having them as part of your network gives you better opportunities when applying for a nursing job in the future. 

It’s good for your health

Volunteering improves your health in general. According to PublicHealth.org, research done by the University of Exeter, people who volunteer adjust better to stress, cope better with changes, have lower rates of depression, and get to live longer and healthier lives. 

Enhances your resume

Applying as a nurse means sending out your resume, and for it to stand out, you must have an impressive resume ready to go. Volunteering gives your resume the spark it needs. It will also show that you are not afraid to take responsibility and are dedicated to the profession. Your experience as a volunteer will also give you the confidence you need when answering an interview and increase your chance of being selected for the job. 

Hands-on experience

Of course, the main reason why you volunteered is to gain first-hand experience. While you are not licensed as a nurse yet, your experience as a volunteer gives you the chance to see what it is like to be one. As a student nurse, your knowledge is also an asset to the facility. So, it is like a give-and-take relationship. You volunteer to help the nurses, and your time as one shapes your skills and comprehension about the job. 

Volunteer Today and Enjoy the Experience

If you have plans to volunteer, do it. You will not regret it – not only will you enjoy the time you allotted in it, but you will also learn a lot of things as you go, call it a sense of satisfaction. Volunteering seals your commitment to saving lives. So, head to the nearest healthcare facility and sign up as one.

 

EP 160: Would You Rather – Nursing Edition

EP 160: Would You Rather – Nursing Edition

Would You Rather – Nursing Edition

You’ve probably heard someone ask you a would you rather question once in your life, right? How did you answer back? Life is full of options to take, and we have to make the best choices when faced with situations. Sometimes, these choices are not as favorable, but we make them work. And how we wish that our life, work, and relationships are easy as making a “this or that” choice. Wouldn’t that be more manageable? 

In this episode, we will be taking a break from our usual topics and let a little loose in this one. Today we will ask our “Would You Rather” questions nurse edition and share our thoughts about them. We hope you find this episode entertaining as much as we enjoyed answering these questions. Check it out!

Would You Rather: Nursing Edition Questions

  1. Would you rather do admission or discharge?
  2. Would you rather work a 24-hour shift or oversleep and be late for your shift?
  3. Would you rather redo your nursing school program or high school?
  4. Would you rather be punched in the face or spit in the mouth?
  5. Would you rather have a rude, ungrateful patient or a patient with a difficult helicopter parent/family member?
  6. Would you rather be a nurse on a cruise ship or a nurse at a music festival? 
  7. Would you rather have co-workers love you and your manager hate you? Or have your co-workers hate you and your manager love you?
  8. Would you rather be ignorant and blissful or smart and never happy?
  9. Would you rather have a C. Diff vs. GI Bleed patient?
  10. Would you rather do the laundry or the dishes for the hospital?
  11. Would you rather be the strongest man on earth or the smartest man on earth?
  12. Would you rather get shit slapped in the face while trying to subdue a psych patient or have to give a bed bath to a patient with bed bugs? 
  13. Would you rather love your hospital, pay, co-workers and managers and hate your city and your life outside of work? Or would you rather hate your hospital, pay, co-workers and managers but love your city and life outside of work?
  14. Would you rather have spilled urine on your pants or trach sputum on your shirt?
  15. Would you rather have vomit in your hair and mouth? Or poop down your shirt?
  16. Would you rather live the rest of your life as a Buddhist monk or be followed continuously by the paparazzi?

Join us as we answer these questions! Watch the full Episode 160 by clicking here 👇

TIMESTAMP:

00:00 Intro
00:53 Plugs
02:57 Episode Intro
03:42 Admission or discharge?
05:12 Work a 24-hour shift or oversleep and be late for your shift?
06:24 Redo your nursing school program or high school?
07:50 Punched in the face or spit in the mouth?
09:14 A rude, ungrateful patient or a patient with a difficult helicopter parent/family member?
11:05 A nurse on a cruise ship or a nurse at a music festival?
12:54 Have co-workers love you and your manager hated you? Or have your co-workers hate you and your manager love you?
14:14 Ignorant and blissful or smart and never happy?
16:26 C. Diff vs. GI Bleed patient?
18:00 Do the laundry or the dishes for the hospital?
19:33 The strongest man on earth or the smartest man on earth?
20:16 Get shit slapped in the face while trying to subdue a psych patient or have to give a bed bath to a patient with bed bugs?
22:49 Love your hospital, pay, co-workers and managers and hate your city and your life outside of work? Or would you rather hate your hospital, pay, co-workers and managers but love your city and life outside of work?
24:11 Have spilled urine on your pants or trach sputum on your shirt?
26:02 Have vomit in your hair and mouth? Or poop down your shirt?
28:25 Live the rest of your life as a Buddhist monk or be followed continuously by the paparazzi?

 

Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

Be a Travel Nurse and Work in These Top 10 Best Places 

So, you are a nurse who is looking for something new to do. You love your job set-up in the healthcare facility you currently work in, but your mind wanders. It would help if you had an adventure. You need to fuel your passion! If this is your current mindset right now, sign up to be a travel nurse and get to choose ten of the best places for this job. 

Where Can Travel Nurses Work?

#1. Alaska

With stunning views and a vast space for fishing, Alaska is home to the largest hospital in the city, the Providence Alaska Medical Center. Travel nurses who enjoy activities like camping, fishing, and boating will surely enjoy Alaska. The growing healthcare industry and great pay are why many travel nurses chose this destination for work [1]. With the city’s unique features and long sunny days, Alaska is ideal for those interested in working here as a nurse and enjoying the outdoors. Make sure to bring plenty of sunscreens! 

#2. California

Cali is home to excellent teaching hospitals, including the UCLA Medical Center, UCSF Medical Center, and others. Not only that, but California is also one of the highest paying nursing salaries in the country. If you love the idea of learning and visiting California’s famous landmarks, this is an exciting place to choose! If you love beaches, California has plenty, and if you are a wine enthusiast, you will surely enjoy the endless array of vineyards there too. There are plenty of places to explore so you will surely love your time here. 

#3. Texas

If you want to work in Texas, Austin is the place to be. Ranked as one of the most popular locations for travel nurses, Austin is a fast-growing city with a high density of healthcare facilities to keep the flow of nurses constant. Besides the booming healthcare industry, Austin is also a hub for entertainment. If you love food, music, and festivals, Austin is your next best destination.

#4. Florida

Another popular destination for travel nurses to work in is Florida – Miami, in particular, is a rather popular state to be in. If you are looking for warm weather and beaches, Florida is an excellent choice. It is a popular location for nurses who enjoy spending time at the beach after long working hours. And if you love exploring popular tourist attractions, Florida is home to Walt Disney World, Universal Studios, and Sea World. They also offer epic nightlife destinations like the Design District, Downtown, and many others. All in all, it is a well-rounded city with many things to do after your shift.

#5. Hawaii

As a travel nurse, you have the opportunity to work in different locations, even with the pandemic travel restrictions that we have now. If you are interested in working far from the usual continental U.S. sights, you can apply for work in Hawaii. However, this may be steep competition as it takes time to get approval for a work permit. But with patience, you too can land an assignment here. Just be reminded that Hawaii is not exactly the place for travel nurses who want to earn top dollar, but if you are longing for an experience of a lifetime, this is it. 

#6. Colorado

Colorado is a compact nursing state which means a license in one state allows you to work assignments in another, just like Texas. If you choose urban life, Denver is an excellent choice to work and be a travel nurse. After your work, you can enjoy the breathtaking views the Rocky Mountains have to offer. If you love skiing, Colorado has plenty of winter sports activities that you will surely love. Not only that, since Colorado is a compact nursing state, you can attain greater work mobility without complications. 

#7. New York City

When we talk about New York, we always think of tall skyscrapers and high-rise apartments. But when it comes to healthcare facilities, New York is one of the best. They are known for medical centers like the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Mount Sinai Hospital. As a travel nurse, you have the opportunity to work in one of the best cities without a permanent commitment. In addition to that, New York is home to prestigious art galleries, museums, parks, and restaurants. This state is also one of those that offer nurses high salaries – which helps in the expensive nature of the city [2].

#8. Arizona

If you are looking for travel nursing opportunities that require low-cost living, then go to Arizona. Tucson City offers travel nursing opportunities that you might like. Among the best features that this city has to offer include food scenes, music, and a predominantly younger demographic of university students and a good number of retirees. So, if the desert life suits you, you might as well look into this location for travel nurse assignments.

#9. Washington

For coffee lovers who are also traveling nurses, working in Washington is a great choice. Seattle is one of the top cities in this state that offers good pay for nurses. With the current nursing shortage in this city, it is an excellent opportunity for you to grab and find an assignment. As the coffee capital of the United States, you will surely enjoy this city. If you love farmer’s markets, you can visit the Pike Place Market, considered the world’s oldest farmer’s market. They also offer museums for you to check out – the Museum of Pop Culture and Museum of Flight are among the best tourist attractions you can find here. 

#10. Chicago

As the United State’s third-largest city, Chicago is home to some of the country’s largest and most prestigious health care facilities. However, with the current pandemic, Chicago also faces nursing shortages, and the demand for nurses has pushed average salaries to $70,000 per year. If you have plans to be a travel nurse in this state, do it. Not only will you enjoy working here, but you will also love the skyscrapers and their famous park called Millenium Park. 

Pack Your Bags and Go!

If the location you would like to be a travel nurse in is not listed here, don’t worry. Many hospitals still need nurses out there, so you can choose wherever your passion takes you! And if your favorite destination is listed here, grab the chance to work today; good luck!

EP 152: Nurses Inspire Nurses with Cat Golden

EP 152: Nurses Inspire Nurses with Cat Golden

Nurses Inspire Nurses with Cat Golden

Nurses are known as carers of the world. When you have sworn the oath to care for the people and wore the badge as a nurse, you become one of the essential workers of our society. Of course, along with this profession comes a myriad of responsibilities. And sometimes, we nurses become so indulged with caring for others that we lack the support we truly need – to be our advocate. 

It’s funny because we take good care of everyone around us, but we often overlook ourselves. Sometimes the carer needs to be cared for too. 

In this episode, we are joined by our guest, Cat Golden. She is the creator and owner of Nurses Inspire Nurses. Her career in the nursing field began as a pediatric nurse, where she worked as one for seven years.

Cat understood what it’s like for a nurse to feel exhausted and isolated, which prompted her to build one of the largest nursing communities in the country. And if you are a tired nurse like many of us, sit back, relax and enjoy another awesome episode with your favorite Cup of Nurses!

Some of the questions that we asked Cat Golden:

  1. Can you give us a background about yourself and your nursing experience?
  2. What does it mean you support nurses as humans first and nurses second?
  3. You always seem to be doing your own thing; what is your current mindset journey? 
  4. How has your community felt with everything that is currently happening in healthcare? 
  5. Has your community grown in the past years? Was it affected by the pandemic? 
  6. Why do you think your community has bonded so well and grown together?
  7. How do you cultivate positivity and self-care in your life?
  8. How do you manage your day-to-day life?
  9. What are all the ways you stay healthy with all the travel you do?

Ready to learn how to inspire nurses? Check out our latest episode here 👇

You can also catch Cat on her personal Instagram account @catgolden.inspires and for business inquiries, you can click on her business page @nursesinspirenurses for more information.

SHOW NOTES:

0:00 Introduction
0:58 Cup of Nurses Introduction
2:19 Episode Introduction
2:55 Meet Cat Golden
3:32 What Cat’s Main Mission Means
4:55 What do you think nurses need most?
7:48 How Cat’s Life Has Changed
9:12 What’s the feedback of your community with healthcare?
10:52 Advice For Nursing Community
12:50 How To Build A Nursing Community
15:07 Why The Community Bonded So Well
17:51 What Shaped Cat Golden To Be The Best Version Of Herself
21:14 How To Cultivate Positivity
24:48 One Thing That Cat Cannot Live Without
29:19 How To Manage Time & Stay Organized
32:02 Hardships That Cat Went Through
38:14 What’s Next For Nurses Inspire Nurses
40:57 Where Can People Find Cat Golden

Why Nurses Leaving Bedside Care is a Big Problem

Why Nurses Leaving Bedside Care is a Big Problem

Why Nurses Leaving Bedside Care is a Big Problem

Nurses leaving bedside care is not surprising news anymore. Ever since the pandemic broke out, the workload of nurses has increased not just once but a few times over. Because of this, many of our nurses are exhausted and burned out. The long hours of work and the overwhelming number of patients to care for have caused some nurses to consider leaving the profession. In this post, we will talk about the cause of nurses leaving the bedside and how it affects them. 

Nurses Leave Bedside Care Due to the Pandemic

There have been plenty of reports regarding nurses quitting their jobs in the middle of the pandemic. Honestly, I can’t say I blame them. The effects of the pandemic have exhausted the nursing workforce. Not only do nurses feel exhausted, but the overwhelming number of patients affected by the new Covid-19 variant has also affected their mental health. Many nurses suffer from anxiety, trauma, and PTSD. [1]

The roles of nurses also changed during the pandemic. Nurses took on new positions beyond their scope as they adapted to the “new normal.” Due to the increasing number of new Covid patients, nurses are needed more in clinics, emergency rooms, and intensive care units where care for sick patients is much needed. That said, the interruption of work due to infected people have created an extra workload for nurses. 

Nurses also work to the bone; they are also in charge of deciding which patients can go to intensive care units or respiratory devices. They also help accompany patients and families as they transition to the end-of-life stages. In addition to that, other risks that nurses deal with include the lack of resources, protective equipment, the risk of getting infected, obligation in new work areas, and many others pushing nurses to give up and leave their jobs amidst the pandemic. 

3 Good Reasons Why Nurses Leave Bedside Care 

Besides the threat of the pandemic, other factors also contributed to nurses leaving bedside care. Here’s what we gathered:

Toxic Working Environment

The primary role of nurses has never changed; they are still the main characters that provide care to enhance the patient’s quality of life along with their knowledge, so they carry out the best care plan.  As the media proclaimed, they are heroes and advocates for the wellness of patients and the general community. However, there have been changes in the last 20 years in the nursing environment.

It mainly involved how nurses should carry out their roles. With the Affordable Care Act’s help, more patients can now access health care for the first time in many years, resulting in an influx of patients with co-morbidities. That said, plenty of nurses work in areas for long hours, tending to more patients than average. 

Toxic Nurse Culture

Ever heard of the phrase “nurses eat their young”? If not then we will break it down for you. This term refers to an almost rite-of-passage in the workplace for new nurses. It’s when seasoned nurses display a form of lateral violence or bullying, and those who have gone through this situation repeat the said behaviors with new nurses under their charge.

It’s a common culture among the nursing staff and is the reason why some nurses leave. Those who cannot connect with fellow nurses in the workplace are often isolated or have feelings of isolation from the group. Add this to a heavy workload, and new nurses can easily get overwhelmed with the demands and stress of work. 

Emotional Exhaustion

Dealing with sick patients can drain your energy, and sometimes, it is emotionally draining as well, especially if you have made a deep connection with your patients. It is why its recommended for nurses to learn how they can balance their emotions and connect with their patients without becoming too attached.

Dealing with the death of a beloved patient is also viewed as a reason why some nurses leave bedside care. So as a nurse, it is your discernment to choose the proper nursing role where your personality traits fit. Nurses who find the right nursing specialty that works best have better work performance and career experience without becoming too emotional for their patients. [2]

How to Help Nurses

There’s no doubt that nurses are valued members of the healthcare world. Without them, bedside care is not possible. Hospital facilities and health organizations must create rules to help nurses function better at work. Creating a program that encourages nurses to stay in bedside care must be available too. These can help educate nurses and catch up with the latest trends to promote a healthy work environment. Flexible schedules can also give nurses the break they need. 

Nurses do their job because the world needs them, especially at trying times like this. They do their best and put their lives on the line for others but at what cost? Hopefully, more healthcare facilities will develop laws that protect the lives of nurses and future nurses. Only then will you see fewer nurses leaving bedside care