Standing Up for Your Health

Standing Up for Your Health

Standing Up for Your Health

Being an advocate for your own health is essential, especially as you age. If you feel you’re not receiving the right type of treatment, you may need to address previously overlooked health concerns or simply take a more active role in physical and financial matters involving your health. Advocating for your health and taking full responsibility for your own care can be both empowering and rewarding. So here are some tips from The Cup of Nurses to help you get started!

Maintain Healthier Habits

One crucial way you can advocate for your health is by actively maintaining it. Exercising and eating healthy on a consistent basis will help you to feel better and avoid illnesses and injuries more consistently. Having more physical strength also enables you to continue living independently. Working out often enough can be challenging if you have a busy work schedule but small movements throughout the day. Yoga can be a fun and challenging way to keep fit, as well!

Be Prepared

If you’re unsure what you might be dealing with, pull up some symptoms and express your concerns. To make things a little easier, you can always organize medical records and other important documents on a PDF. This free tool will enable you to edit a PDF online, which you can then save to your iPhone for easy access once you reach the doctor’s office.

Prepare for Insurance Needs

If you’re unsure about a diagnosis, get a second opinion! Whether or not you have Medicare, you need to know how your insurance policy in Virginia works, what it covers, and how often you can use it.

Stand Up for Your Care Needs

If you’re unsure about a diagnosis and want a second opinion, you shouldn’t feel bad about getting one. You’re the last defense against poor medical care and should be adamant about getting opinions you trust and being sure about them. If you don’t feel like the medical professional in Alexandria, you’re currently seeing is providing adequate care, don’t hesitate to explore other options.

Look After Yourself

Taking an active role in maintaining your health is essential. Not only does improving your health have a tremendous impact on your body, but it can also benefit your mind as well. When your body is healthy, you’ll feel less depressed. What’s more, your stress levels may decrease, too.

Be Brave

Dealing with health concerns or chronic conditions is never easy, so you’ll want to get familiar with your insurance plan and financial arrangements, hold your doctor accountable and ask questions. Don’t be afraid to involve a loved one if you need help or emotional support.

The Cup of Nurses is your source for current health news and hot nursing topics. If you have any questions, please contact us at marketing@cupofnurses.com.

Post solely for the use of cupofnurses.com By Roxanne Brent
Follow her at: https://singleparent.info/

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

5 Common Causes of Nurse Burnout

The common causes of nurse burnout are rarely talked about these days. With the pandemic still rolling, nurses often go on with their lives. But the stress and burnout nurses feel are very real. The pandemic affects the work of nurses and the different factors that make their jobs extra challenging. 

The 5 Causes of Nurse Burnout

A nurse’s job is overwhelming and can be a toxic experience when the shifts are long. Of course, nurses are superheroes, and nothing seems to weigh them down. But there are plenty of other reasons why nurses are often exhausted at work. Here are common causes of nurse burnout:

#1. Stressful environment

Most nurses work in a stressful environment and often involve high-stress levels. Nurses who work in particular areas like the Emergency Rooms, Trauma Unit, or Intensive Care deal with traumatic injuries, combative patients, high mortality rates, and ethical dilemmas that put more strain on themselves. As a result, the burnout these nurses face is widespread. 

#2. Short Staff

The shortage of nurses is now a real problem in many hospitals. These days nurses handle more patients nurses than they can, and with the increasing number of Covid patients, it is more likely that nurses are understaffed. There is also an increase in retiring nurses, making it harder for new nurses to adjust to their roles. 

#3. Lack of Sleep

As a nurse, your job often involves working night shifts and long hours. Because of this, many nurses do not get enough sleep. And even if they do, it is not the best quality of sleep either. In a survey conducted by Kronos, 25% of nurses reported suffering from insomnia or chronic fatigue. 

#4. Lack of team support

One of the many reasons for nurse burnout is when team members do not cooperate. Poor teamwork caused by conflicts, lack of communication, and bullying can lead to poor execution of nursing care. It can also lead to a toxic work environment and medical errors if many nurses do not work together. 

#5. Emotional exhaustion

The main job of nurses includes patient care which is the most rewarding aspect of this profession. As a nurse, you form connections with patients and their families when you help and care for them. However, this could also lead to emotional distress for nurses, especially if they are in critical or end-of-life care. 

Nurses who take care of several patients at once can also lead to emotional exhaustion. And nurses who are taking care of more than four patients in one shift have higher risks of burning out and raising each patient’s chances by 23%. 

Other Reasons for Nurse Burnout

While the ones mentioned above are prevalent, there are also other reasons why some nurses are exhausted to the rim. Among these include:

  • Work overload and time pressures
  • Role conflicts and ambiguity
  • Career development issues
  • Being exposed to infectious diseases 
  • Needlestick injuries
  • Work-related threats and violence
  • Difficult patients

How to Know If You are a Burnout Nurse?

There are plenty of signs that you are already burnout as a nurse. While there are signs that you are experiencing total burnout, some nurses quickly dismiss it and continue working. If you are that nurse, then it’s time to sit back and take note of these burnout symptoms. 

Gets sick easily

One of the most common signs of burnout is when you get sick often. A weakened immune system can lead to many gastrointestinal issues, heart problems, and chronic pain. If you are not careful, these can easily manifest after contracting viruses. You also experience constipation, aches, and pains. 

Experiences compassion fatigue

People who become nurses are compassionate by nature. And nurses who often work with the sick and dying tend to lose their compassion after witnessing pain and suffering. Because of this, some nurses detach themselves from patients due to feelings of failure and cynicism toward their job. 

Chronic fatigue

Have you ever felt exhausted but cannot seem to get rid of it no matter how much you rest? Do you go to bed tired but still wake up feeling the same in the morning? It is a common sign of chronic fatigue. As a nurse, this condition is widespread. Extreme physical exhaustion, unable to catch up with sleep, and dozing off at hours when you should be awake are among the most common signs of this condition. It is often felt by nurses who work long hours on consistent shifts. 

Lack of enthusiasm 

When you were a new nurse, working seemed to be an exciting thing. However, as the years go on, this enthusiasm seems to fade. If you ever dread going to work and focus on going home whenever you are there, your confidence in this job is starting to die down. And that is not a good thing. Your lack of enthusiasm may lead to other issues at work.

Feelings of being unvalued

Work is part of a nurse’s life. But when you are overworked as a nurse, you may feel unappreciated and unvalued. And when this goes on for long, feelings of resentment and frustration can happen. This resentment could be towards their job, coworkers, and even their patients. It is not a good state of emotion for a nurse. If this is the case, the best step is to reach out to someone you can talk to about how you feel. You can either discuss this with your supervisor or a therapist to get the help you need.  

Overwhelming anxiety

To the general population, having anxiety is normal. It is also a part of our lives – to experience anxiety. However, when the stress becomes crippling, it can be an issue. Nurses who feel too pressured at work to the point that they cannot function normally can become a problem. Burnout can cause severe stress, which leads to insomnia or delays in daily activities. Nurses cannot give quality care when they are not feeling their best. 

Your Takeaway

These are the common reasons for nurse burnout and when you feel you are going way over than you can carry, take a pause and rest. Ask for sick leave or vacation leave. Take time off to take care of yourself. 

Keep in mind that nurses like you are human too. Do take time to recharge and refresh your mind and body. A few days off work will not hurt you. And remember, you must take care of yourself first before taking care of others. Make your health a priority above all else! 

 

EP 189: Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

EP 189: Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

Nurse-on-Nurse Violence and Communication

Nurse-on-nurse violence is a serious issue that’s happening all over the world. An average of two nurses every hour experience being abused in their workplace. And many don’t even file reports about it. 

When we say violence, the first thing that comes to our mind is physical assault but that’s not the only form of violence. In fact, violence also happens in the place of work. OSHA or Occupational Safety Health Administration defines workplace violence as 

“Any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers, and visitors. ” 

In the United States, acts of violence and other injuries are the third-leading causes of fatal occupational injuries. And for nurses, this is sometimes the reality that we face. How can we avoid this? How can we stop nurse-on-nurse violence? And what can we do in case acts of violence occur in our workplace? 

Our Guest

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Phil La Duke. Phil is currently employed as a writer, and board member on over ten medical research oversight boards. We talk about workplace violence and the importance of communication and emotional de-escalation.  

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Share with us your background and experience.
  2. Working with worker safety what are the most common safety issues or injuries?
    • Where are all the fallouts that cause these to happen?
  3. What made you get into safety?
  4. What are the biggest safety issues in hospitals or in healthcare facilities? 
  5. A survey from Beckers Hospital revealed that 92% of healthcare workers have experienced or witnessed violence from a patient or their caregiver.  
    • How can we combat that?
  6. What does it mean to be part of a medical research board?
  7. What made you start writing books?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Do you want to know how we can resolve nurse-on-nurse violence? Click here for the full episode 👇👇👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:21 About Phil La Duke
05:09 How Phil started working in healthcare
07:44 The Just Culture
09:50 Risk-taking decisions
11:26 How Phil came about to workplace violence
16:47 The weird life of Phil La Duke
21:17 Common workplace violence in a hospital
38:00 Interventions to avoid workplace violence
59:31 How to Deescalate
01:17:54 Wrapping up the show

EP 187: The Opportunities Nursing Brings with Britt Greaves

EP 187: The Opportunities Nursing Brings with Britt Greaves

The Opportunities Nursing Brings with Britt Greaves

The opportunities nursing brings are endless. Nursing, as a profession, offers plenty of chances for better careers and many nursing fields that you can pursue. And while this opens many possibilities to nurses, many are also hesitant to change career fields. There’s that feeling that they cannot do other things than the ones they already know. But this is not true, as nurses, we have the skills to survive anything.

We have the power to choose, remember that. If you are unhappy with work, it’s time to make room for changes. Explore new places, try different nursing units, pursue the nursing field of your dreams – take hold of your career and embrace the opportunities we’re given. Let’s start today. 

Our Guest

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Britt Greaves. Britt Greaves is a nurse who worked in specialties such as Hospice/Palliative Care, and ICU, and traveled for over  5 years in the PICU. When she isn’t working you can find her blogging, volunteering on international medical mission trips, or advocating for mental health in the nursing community through her founded safe space The Debrief. Transitioning from the bedside, Britt is the Community Manager at Trusted Health, where she now advocates for the health of the nursing community. 

We discuss the importance of speaking about your feelings, how to heal, and the debrief. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We go off-topic all the time so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas please let us know. Looking forward to our conversation!

  1. How has your nursing journey been?
    • You’ve worked in a handful of specialties as a staff and then as a travel nurse to now focusing on projects away from the bedside. How did you slowly transition away from staff to travel?
  2. Is there a time you can recall in or out of nursing that really opened up your mind to mindfulness and mental health?
    • Can you talk to us about how you began incorporating mindfulness into your life and how it has helped you?
    • Meditation, what kind do you do?
  3. What were the darkest depths you have experienced as a traveler to rediscover yourself? 
  4. Chakras and sound healing, how did you get into it? And how does it help you?
    • What were you struggling with that turned you to these practices?
  5. What is the Debrief?
  6. How did you get involved with trusted and what is trusted? 

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Catch more of Britt on her Instagram account at @catchbrittifyoucan or visit her at  https://events.trustedhealth.com/ for more. 

You can learn more about the opportunities nursing brings by watching the full episode here 👇👇

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:02 About Brit Greaves
02:43 Exploring other fields of healthcare
05:56 The benefits of travel nursing
07:30 The reasons for leaving the bedside
09:16 The challenges outside of nursing
10:42 Nursing attributes that help through life
13:03 Healing yourself, meditation, and sound healing
20:12 About The Debrief
22:19 Selfcare in nursing and gratitude
27:24 Why is it hard for nurses to take time off?
34:42 Talking about TravCon
35:43 Goals for the travel nursing community
38:28 Opportunities as a travel nurse
40:43 End remarks

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving problems in leadership is the key to easing the burden of many nurses and healthcare professionals. Burnout is an ongoing issue that many nurses are experiencing. The sad thing is it can happen to anyone’s career. Long-term stress can cause anyone mental and physical exhaustion. And for the nursing profession, burnout results from their demanding job, nursing shortages, and frequent exposure to human suffering. 

Nurses are witnesses to death and grieving families each day. Add the long work hours, complex patients, workplace drama, and not having effective support or leadership in the workplace can lead to intense burnout. When you are burnout, you feel helpless, but if you know how to manage it, you can enjoy a successful nursing career. But the question remains, how can we help our healthcare leaders? Is there a way in solving problems in leadership?

Our Guests

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson, co-founders of MissingLogic. With more than 60 years of combined healthcare experience, they help healthcare organizations and healthcare leaders combat burnout and improve satisfaction through the power of a framework-driven approach founded on Polarity Intelligence.

We talk about how the idea of a single solution to a single problem approach does not always fit the healthcare model and how polarity plays a role in leadership and healthcare dynamics. 

 QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes. 

  1. Can you give us your nursing experience & background
  2. Based on your experience, speak to us about leadership in healthcare 
    • Why do we need new leadership norms in healthcare?
  3. What are some toxic workplace behaviors/environments that lead to burnout?
  4. What is Polarity intelligence? 
    • How does it benefit hospital organizations and nurse leaders?
    • How do you identify tension in the workplace?
  1. How do you guys go about consulting organizations in healthcare?
    • What are the three pillars of a healthy healthcare organization?
      • People, Processes, and Performance. 
  2. How do you create dynamic balance in our lives – professionally and personally?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Catch up with Michelle and Dr. Tracy to learn more about solving problems in leadership on their Instagram at @missinglogic_llc and follow them on their Facebook at Missing Logic, LLC. You can also connect with them through their LinkedIn profile at missinglogicllc for more information.

Let’s learn the ways to solve problems in leadership by watching the full episode here 👇

 

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:00 About Michelle and Tracy
05:46 Importance of healthy leadership in healthcare
09:17 Stressors for nurse managers
12:34 Toxic behavior that leads to burnout
17:23 Polarity Intelligence
21:19 Margins and the mission
24:43 Challenges in union vs nonunion hospital
30:18 Is more nurses ever the solution?
36:21 How healthcare organizations solve problems
37:46 Unit satisfaction and culture
42:31 Characteristics of good leaders
50:22 End Remarks