Why Nurses Become Travel Nurses

Why Nurses Become Travel Nurses

Why Nurses Become Travel Nurses

These days many nurses are leaving bedside nursing to pursue travel nursing. With the many perks and benefits of travel nursing, we can’t blame them too. Travel nursing allows nurses to explore and experience diverse practices and new environments.

It is also a great way to connect and work with nurses in different nursing communities. With great pay, free housing, and many more, it is no wonder nurses are packing up their bags to become travel nurses. 

As a travel nurse, you can work in all 50 states as your assignments vary and can be as long as 13 weeks. You also have the liberty to choose which assignment works for you based on many factors. These factors include:

  • Climate
  • Nursing opportunities
  • Payment and incentives
  • Location
  • Proximity to friends and family
  • Activities to do
  • Compensation

Besides having this option, there are also many pros to travel nursing, which makes it more favorable. Among these include:

  • There are fewer nursing responsibilities.
  • Many assignments have higher pay.
  • You have free housing or housing options with bigger discounts.
  • There is flexibility to work as much or as little as you want.
  • You get to explore different work cultures.
  • All your travel expenses are reimbursed when moving from one contract to another. 
  • You get to explore different places. 
  • There are work bonuses. 

So Many Reasons Why

Another good reason why many nurses pack up and leave the bedside is stress. There are many reasons why nurses are stressed at work. It could be due to nursing shortages, unfair nurse-to-patient ratios, workplace politics, and exhaustion. If you are a nurse yearning for better pay and a less stressful environment, this could be a great opportunity to grab. 

The idea of working in a different place is also awesome. You get to explore new places, and if you’re the adventurous type, you can explore so many places as a travel nurse. Activities like hiking, camping, trekking, and even going to the beach are only among the recreation you can do as a travel nurse. Depending on where you are assigned, adventure awaits many travel nurses! 

You can also choose the nursing specialty or unit you want to work as a travel nurse. There are many special areas that you can apply to. If you have experience as an ICU nurse, you can look for assignments that allow travel nurses to work in ICU. The same goes for those with experience in PICU, ER, and many others. 

It is no secret that many travel nurses are paid more than staff nurses. Most of your travel nurse salary is tax-free simply because you travel more than 50 miles from home. However, hourly wages are usually non-negotiable. But you will be given bonuses and benefits as it fits. 

Conclusion

We can’t blame nurses who are packing up to become travel nurses. Many reasons may affect their decisions too. Whether for their clinical experience, money, or adventure, it is a good way for nurses to get some weight off their backs and see the world.

Travel nursing offers adventures, reliable income, and flexibility; as a nurse, this sounds like the freedom you’d want to get your hands on. 

Looking for more nursing and travel nursing information? Check out these helpful links!

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

Working as a travel nurse is one of the most liberating areas of nursing. You can choose the areas you want to work in and even enjoy the benefits of financially lucrative travel nursing positions.

If you are interested in becoming a travel nurse, get to know which areas pay the most.

Nurses can choose almost any specialty area to work in, in the travel healthcare sector. As travel nurses, you will be making more than a staff position in a position or specialty.

It is wise to select from some of the highest-paying nursing specialties. 

1. Intensive Unite Care Nurse or ICU Nurse

One of the most in-demand areas for travel nurses belongs to the ICU. If you have experience in this department, you are in luck, as many hospitals use nurses in the ICU to float around other units because of their broadened skills and knowledge.

It makes them valuable members of the team.

ICU nurses are trained to care for the critically ill and have a broad array of skills. As a travel nurse, you too can work in this area as long as you have the skills or experience of an ICU nurse. Most facilities look for at least 1-2 years of experience.

2. Labor and Delivery Nurse 

Nurses specializing in obstetrics and women’s health, especially in antepartum and postpartum care, are constantly in-demand. L&D nurses are also among the highest-paid nurses in the country and one of the travel nursing positions with the highest pay.

However, before you sign the contract, consider a few things first. While you will be taking care of healthy patients in this area, you must be ready to handle any emergencies that could occur.

These may include emergency C-sections and many others. If you are up for the challenge, then this could be a fantastic opportunity for you. 

3. Emergency Room or ER Nurse

Do you enjoy a fast-paced environment while working as a nurse? If you do, then working as an ER nurse is the best place for you.

Many travel nurses can work in this department and earn more pay than their staff job.

Remember that working in the ER means you have to constantly use your critical thinking skills, so if you love solving problems, this could be the right place for you.

When looking for an ER position, it is always good to look at the hospital trauma level, it may be more acute than your used to.

4. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurse or PICU Nurse/ Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or NICU

As a travel nurse, you will have the chance to work with some of the latest technology used in childcare, with plenty of nursing opportunities in states like Texas, New York, New Jersey, California, and many others. 

5. Medical-Surgical/Telemetry Nurse

The need for nurses with exceptional skills and knowledge in medical-surgical nursing is in demand these days. Since the number of Covid patients is still elevated, there is always a need for nurses in this area.

Travel nurses can apply for this position and earn up to  $5,000/week. If you are a nurse who can handle several patients and can manage time effectively, this could be an excellent opportunity to take.

6. Operating Room Nurse or OR Nurse

One of the most interesting areas and travel nursing positions with the highest pay belongs to the Operating Room.

You will be a valuable asset to many hospitals across the country for travel nurses with perioperative skills.

If you are certified at a specific OR skill or have a wide range of operating room experience, t you can snag any  OR position, 

In Closing

Consider also the location of the place for your travel nursing assignment. Some states pay higher than others. Now that you know which areas pay travel nurses the most, find a good agency that can get you a position in these areas.

It is also an excellent option to do more research on travel nursing before asking for an assignment. That way, you know what to expect and still earn more than staff. 

 

Looking for more nursing and travel nursing information? Check out these helpful links!

4 Painful Parts of Being a Nurse

4 Painful Parts of Being a Nurse

4 Painful Parts of Being a Nurse

Parts of being a nurse involve the things ordinary people don’t do. Yes, nursing is exciting, but as exciting as it is, many nurses have seen and experienced things at work but have not discussed them.

It is also true that it’s one of the most stressful jobs in the world. While nursing is rewarding, there are also many life-and-death situations and patient care challenges. 

Nursing is one of the most underappreciated professions, yet, the most regulated. It is because nurses are handling the lives of people every day. Not only their patients but the lives of other nurses too.

It is why there are also the worst parts of nursing. What are the painful parts of nursing? And what can nurses do? 

 

We Can’t Save All Lives

The sad reality is nurses deal with death and dying patients every day. It doesn’t matter what kind of area they specialize in; nurses deal with death. The worst part is that nurses are human beings, and it’s not easy each time they lose a patient.

Many nurses wish they could cry with patients’ families, comfort them, hold their hands, hug them, and grieve with these families, but they can’t. Nurses refrain from crying not because we can’t but because we must stay professional. We need to stay strong for the families left behind.

Nursing is not for the faint of heart. You will see many things that make an ordinary person queasy or heartbroken. Patients’ suffering is part of our daily lives; whether we like it or not, we deal with losing them the best way we know how. 

 

We Handle All the Gross Stuff

Handling the things no one else will touch is part of a nurse’s daily life. From body fluids, mucus, blood, sputum, and phlegm – we handle them. Lucky for us, we were taught earlier about these things in nursing school.

And you must provide nursing care for patients suffering from all kinds of conditions, including those that secrete the grossest things. We don’t shy away from these things because it’s part of the job. 

 

Seeing the Bad and Sad Side of Life

It is a known fact that medical work can expose you to some horrific things that can take an emotional toll on you. And a nurse is one of those healthcare workers that sees these things up close and personal. 

As nurses, we see the terrible things that would make you question life. How can a 5-year-old go through multiple heart operations? A 20-year-old who needs a heart transplant because of drug abuse?

We’ve seen a young mother of four battling cancer. We’ve seen healthy people robbed of a good life because of a botched medical procedure. Let’s not forget those who said goodbye to their loved ones who’ve gone too soon—all of these and more.

Being exposed to these things and seeing them unfold in your eyes makes you wonder why life is unfair to those who need it the most. It can be hard to deal with and sometimes affect your mental health. 

 

You’ll feel unappreciated and overworked

Sometimes, you feel burned out from working too much. As nurses, we work endlessly, and sometimes we feel unappreciated. Long shifts, understaffed units, increased patient ratio, and Covid-19 made this job more demanding than it used to be.

Our sacrifices and compassion go unseen by the public and administrators. Sum all that, and you have an exhausted nurse who is on the brink of giving up. And we cannot avoid this.

It’s there, an ever-present occurrence that many nurses experience. It’s a problem that nurses face, but at the same time, something that we cannot resolve entirely. 

 

In Closing

While we experienced many losses, touched many gross things, and did many overtime hours, nursing is still one of the most rewarding jobs. It is an honor to be called to be a nurse.

And while many nurses are made, only a few are born to be one. If you are one of them, stand up and be proud. Nurses are heaven-sent!

 

Looking for more nursing and travel nursing information? Check out these helpful links!

6 Good Reasons to Become a Nurse Today

6 Good Reasons to Become a Nurse Today

6 Good Reasons to Become a Nurse Today

There are many reasons why one should become a nurse. Besides answering the demand of nursing shortage, you also get to experience many things that other jobs don’t have.

If you are working your way up to earning your degree in nursing, these top # good reasons to become a nurse will encourage you more to get that degree! Here’s what you need to know. 

 

Good Reasons to Become a Nurse

 

Nursing jobs have a steady growth

Registered nurses are among the most sought-after occupation in many states all over the country. It belongs to the top 50 in-demand jobs and answers the country’s nursing shortage.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics stated that there would be a growth in nursing jobs and will continue to do so until 2030. As the number of aging and retiring nurses increases, nursing jobs will always be in demand. 

Solid earning potential

Nurses are one of the top-paying professions in the world. You indeed handle many responsibilities but are also well-compensated for the job. A registered nurse has a median salary of $48,000 to $75,000 and is as high as $145,000 annually.

If you have an MSN and other nursing degrees, expect to earn more in this field. It’s not so bad, either. 

Expanding career

Your job as a nurse is not limited to bedside care. You can also be an administrator, entrepreneur, doctor, or policymaker. Take Cup of Nurses, for example; they’re bloggers and nurses; now that’s something exciting! 

You can be anyone you want to be, even as a nurse. As long as you take classes to take classes that pertain to more than just patient care, you can achieve anything. 

As nurses become more available throughout healthcare, politics, and business, their jobs will expand to more areas. You will always have a choice to choose a career path without leaving the nursing field entirely.

Pick a specialty you like

When it comes to career versatility, nursing is one of the best. You can choose any specialty that interests you. If you love psychology, you can try psychiatric nursing.

If being in action is your thing, emergency room nurses will suit your taste. Be a forensic nurse if you are passionate about working with victims and helping them with their cases. You can even become a nurse anesthetist if you wish to join the operating room team. 

With a nursing degree, you’re qualified with just about any specialty in nursing. Plus, you can constantly shift careers until you find one that you want to pursue. 

The nursing community is vibrant

Nurses may work a lot, but they have a community that helps and supports each other. There are organizations, boards, bloggers, and interactive blogs where nurses can talk about anything and socialize.

More significant associations like American Nursing Association is also a big part of the nursing community that supports nurses. 

Be part of a respected profession.

Nurses are among the most respected professionals in the country. It is a career that cares for the sick and dying, so you must be proud to be part of it.

People have high respect for nurses, and while this is not the first job that people look into in the medical field, it is the first one they think about when it comes to honest and ethical work.

You are also working and making a difference in people’s lives. It is something to be proud of. 

 

Your takeaway

If you are a student nurse having thoughts about being a nurse, it’s time you stay put. Don’t quit yet! Nursing is a rewarding career that touches people’s lives and creates a good path for yourself. There is financial stability and career growth for you that not many jobs can give. 

We understand how tough nursing school is; we’ve been there ourselves. But if you keep pushing towards your goals, you’ll see it’s all worth it.

Trust the process, and trust us when we say you can do it. We need more frontline warriors, and we believe you are called to be one. We are rooting for you; good luck!

Looking for more student resources? Check out these helpful links!

6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

The nursing shortage has been an ongoing issue for many years, but this is all propaganda. We now know that there is no real shortage of nurses.

But then again, what will happen if we are short on nurses? What happens when there are not enough nurses in the healthcare field? Here are six things that will happen.

 

When Nurses Disappear

Nurses are the jack of all trades in the healthcare industry. They do almost everything. From completing their front desk duties to transferring patients, and laboratory work, nurses are there, working all the time.

But what will happen if a majority of the nurses are gone? Will the world remain the same? Six things could happen when nurses are no longer here to do their job.

 

1. There will be more burnouts

When there are not enough nurses, more nurses are compelled to work more and stay on longer shifts. There’s no more downtime, and spending time with their family and friends is little to none. Tasks will pile up, and the remaining nurses will feel overwhelmed.

This will drain them more to the point that they are no longer happy to do their job. In time, they will also quit, leaving fewer nurses to do the same routine and heading to the same route as their former colleagues.

If no more nurses are left, this cycle will continue until no one is left to care for the sick and dying.

 

2. Low-quality patient care

Burnout causes nurses to lose patience quickly. When you’re always tired, dealing with difficult patients is challenging. And worse, burnout nurses won’t bother getting to know their patients or their cases any longer.

This could affect the kind of care they give to their patients. And as a result, this could lead to poor quality care and many problems for patients and nurses.

 

3. More medical errors

No other healthcare professional stays with the patient longer than nurses. We are the ones who take care of the patient when the doctors are not around, and we make sure that all of them are taken care of. But what happens when a nurse is burned out? Tending to one patient can take around 15-20 minutes tops.

If you have ten patients waiting in line for their medication, you must take time and assess each medication so the right one goes to the correct patient. And when you’re a burned-out nurse, you could miss a small yet important detail about your patient’s medication. It can cost your patient’s life and your job on the line.

 

4. Low patient satisfaction

A burned-out nurse cannot provide quality patient care, leading to low patient satisfaction. The lack of available nurses can also affect this; many patients will feel like they are not given the care they came to the hospital for.

 

5. High mortality rate

Nurses are the ones who care for the sick and dying. When there are not enough nurses on the floor, emergency patients will be forced to wait longer.

Emergency services will be delayed, and medical assistance will also be slow. We know that time is of the essence, especially when it comes to critical patients. When nurses are burned out, the lives of our patients are at stake.

 

6. Animosity among nurses

A short-staffed hospital means more work for the remaining nurses. This puts them under a lot of pressure and stress. And when stress takes over, peer relationships can get strained easily.

Misunderstandings, like a simple bathroom break, coming in a few minutes late for work, or late endorsements, become a big deal to each other.

 

Your Takeaway

There is no nursing shortage if healthcare facilities take care of their nurses. Providing them with the help they need when they’re feeling down, like counseling or some needed time off, will make a difference.

Nurses are not robots; we must take care of them. If we want nurses to be around longer and happier, we must find a way to help them too.

 

Looking for more nursing and travel nursing information? Check out these helpful links!