6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

6 Things That Will Happen When We Don’t Have Enough Nurses

The nursing shortage has been an ongoing issue for many years, but this is all propaganda. We now know that there is no real shortage of nurses. But then again, what will happen if we are short on nurses? What happens when there are not enough nurses in the healthcare field? Here are six things that will happen.

When Nurses Disappear

Nurses are the jack of all trades in the healthcare industry. They do almost everything. From completing their front desk duties to transferring patients, and laboratory work, nurses, are there, working all the time. But when nurses are gone, will the world still be the same? Six things could happen when nurses are no longer here to do their job.

There will be more burnouts

When there are not enough nurses, more nurses are compelled to work more and stay on longer shifts. There’s no more downtime, and spending time with their family and friends is little to none. Tasks will pile up, and the remaining nurses will feel overwhelmed. This will drain them more to the point that they are no longer happy to do their job. In time, they will also quit, leaving fewer nurses to do the same routine and heading to the same route as their former colleagues. If no more nurses are left, this cycle will continue until no one is left to care for the sick and dying.

Low-quality patient care

Burnout causes nurses to lose patience quickly. When you’re always tired, dealing with difficult patients is challenging. And worse, burnout nurses won’t bother getting to know their patients or their cases any longer. This could affect the kind of care they give to their patients. And as a result, this could lead to poor quality care and many problems for patients and nurses.

More medical errors

No other healthcare professional stays with the patient longer than nurses. We are the ones who take care of the patient when the doctors are not around, and we make sure that all of them are taken care of. But what happens when a nurse is burned out? Tending to one patient can take around 15-20 minutes tops.

If you have ten patients waiting in line for their medication, you must take time and assess each medication so the right one goes to the correct patient. And when you’re a burned-out nurse, you could miss a small yet important detail about your patient’s medication. It can cost your patient’s life and your job on the line.

Low patient satisfaction

A burned-out nurse cannot provide quality patient care, leading to low patient satisfaction. The lack of available nurses can also affect this; many patients will feel like they are not given the care they came to the hospital for.

High mortality rate

Nurses are the ones who care for the sick and dying. When there are not enough nurses on the floor, emergency patients will be forced to wait longer. Emergency services will be delayed, and medical assistance will also be slow. We know that time is of the essence, especially when it comes to critical patients. When nurses are burned out, the lives of our patients are at stake.

Animosity among nurses

A short-staffed hospital means more work for the remaining nurses. This puts them under a lot of pressure and stress. And when stress takes over, peer relationships can get strained easily. Misunderstandings, like a simple bathroom break, coming in a few minutes late for work, or late endorsements, become a big deal to each other.

Your Takeaway

There is no nursing shortage if healthcare facilities take care of their nurses. Providing them with the help they need when they’re feeling down, like counseling or some needed time off, will make a difference. Nurses are not robots; we must take care of them. If we want nurses to be around longer and happier, we must find a way to help them too.

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

EP 186: Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving Problems in Leadership with Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson

Solving problems in leadership is the key to easing the burden of many nurses and healthcare professionals. Burnout is an ongoing issue that many nurses are experiencing. The sad thing is it can happen to anyone’s career. Long-term stress can cause anyone mental and physical exhaustion. And for the nursing profession, burnout results from their demanding job, nursing shortages, and frequent exposure to human suffering. 

Nurses are witnesses to death and grieving families each day. Add the long work hours, complex patients, workplace drama, and not having effective support or leadership in the workplace can lead to intense burnout. When you are burnout, you feel helpless, but if you know how to manage it, you can enjoy a successful nursing career. But the question remains, how can we help our healthcare leaders? Is there a way in solving problems in leadership?

Our Guests

In this episode, we would like to introduce you to Michelle Troseth and Dr. Tracy Christopherson, co-founders of MissingLogic. With more than 60 years of combined healthcare experience, they help healthcare organizations and healthcare leaders combat burnout and improve satisfaction through the power of a framework-driven approach founded on Polarity Intelligence.

We talk about how the idea of a single solution to a single problem approach does not always fit the healthcare model and how polarity plays a role in leadership and healthcare dynamics. 

 QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes. 

  1. Can you give us your nursing experience & background
  2. Based on your experience, speak to us about leadership in healthcare 
    • Why do we need new leadership norms in healthcare?
  3. What are some toxic workplace behaviors/environments that lead to burnout?
  4. What is Polarity intelligence? 
    • How does it benefit hospital organizations and nurse leaders?
    • How do you identify tension in the workplace?
  1. How do you guys go about consulting organizations in healthcare?
    • What are the three pillars of a healthy healthcare organization?
      • People, Processes, and Performance. 
  2. How do you create dynamic balance in our lives – professionally and personally?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests. If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Catch up with Michelle and Dr. Tracy to learn more about solving problems in leadership on their Instagram at @missinglogic_llc and follow them on their Facebook at Missing Logic, LLC. You can also connect with them through their LinkedIn profile at missinglogicllc for more information.

Let’s learn the ways to solve problems in leadership by watching the full episode here 👇

 

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
02:00 About Michelle and Tracy
05:46 Importance of healthy leadership in healthcare
09:17 Stressors for nurse managers
12:34 Toxic behavior that leads to burnout
17:23 Polarity Intelligence
21:19 Margins and the mission
24:43 Challenges in union vs nonunion hospital
30:18 Is more nurses ever the solution?
36:21 How healthcare organizations solve problems
37:46 Unit satisfaction and culture
42:31 Characteristics of good leaders
50:22 End Remarks

EP 185: Is There Nursing Shortage with The Nurse Erica

EP 185: Is There Nursing Shortage with The Nurse Erica

Is There Nursing Shortage with The Nurse Erica

Is there a nursing shortage in the United States? That is the question in everyone’s mind. But according to the American Nurses Association, more nursing jobs will be available through 2022. It is the fastest-growing profession compared to any other job in the US. 

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than 275,000 additional nurses are needed from 2020 to 2030 while employment opportunities are predicted to grow at 9% until 2026. That said, the nursing shortage is not entirely true. And what that in mind, we introduce to your our guest, The Nurse Erica as we discuss this topic. 

The Nurse Erica, as she is known on social media, is a prolific advocate for nurses. She says the things we all want to say but are too afraid of retaliation. 

We talk about her journey from being a nurse to a nurse manager, the fake nursing shortage, and the lack of nursing unions. 

QUESTIONS FOR GUESTS

The questions below are some we’d like to tackle. We often go off-topic, so we don’t expect to hit them all. If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Looking forward to our conversation!

These are the questions you had in Calendly. We’ll go off your questions and wherever else our conversation goes.

  1. Erica, can you give a little background about yourself?
  2. What shift have you noticed in the nursing community pre versus post-pandemic?
  3. Do you have a personal first-hand experience that made you advocate for nurses?
  4. What are some nurses’ rights that are non-negotiable for all nurses to navigate the complexities of care properly?
    • We are big on safe work environments that prioritize and protect nurses’ well-being and provide support, resources, and tools to stay psychologically and physically whole. 
  5. What are the benefits of nursing unions?
  6. What should nurses know when it comes to reporting?
  7. Why do you say there is no nursing shortage?

ENDING QUESTIONS

Before we end the show, we have one last question we like to ask all our guests.

If you had the opportunity to have a Cup of coffee with anybody one last time, who would it be & why? 

Connect with Nurse Erica through her Instagram at @the.nurse.erica and Facebook Page at Nurse Erica for more updates. 

You can also visit and subscribe to her YouTube channel at The Nurse Erica or follow her on TikTok at @the.nurse.erica for the latest. 

Learn more about nursing shortage by watching the full episode here 👇

 

TIME STAMPS:

00:00 Introduction
01:42 About the guest
02:32 Nursing school vs nursing
06:15 Changes in healthcare post-pandemic
09:26 How managers and nurse leaders can help nurses
14:08 Corruption in healthcare
19:51 Setting boundaries as a nurse
23:20 The powerlessness of nursing and where to file reports
26:29 Are nursing unions worth it?
33:20 Why hospitals hate unions
43:48 Is there a nursing shortage?
51:13 End remarks

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

6 Travel Nursing Positions with the Highest Pay

Working as a travel nurse is one of the most liberating areas of nursing. You can choose the areas you want to work in and even enjoy the benefits of financially lucrative travel nursing positions. If you are interested in becoming a travel nurse, get to know which areas pay the most.

Nurses can choose almost any specialty area to work in, in the travel healthcare sector. As travel nurses, you will be making more than a staff position in a position or specialty, it is wise to select from some of the highest paying nursing specialties. 

1. Intensive Unite Care Nurse or ICU Nurse

One of the most in-demand areas for travel nurses belongs to the ICU. If you have experience in this department, you are in luck as many hospitals use nurses in the ICU to float around other units because of their broadened skills and knowledge, making them valuable members of the team. ICU nurses are trained to care for the critically ill and have a broad array of skills. As a travel nurse, you too can work in this area as long as you have the skills or experience as an ICU nurse. Most facilities look for at least 1-2 years of experience.

2. Labor and Delivery Nurse 

Nurses who specialize in obstetrics and women’s health, especially in antepartum and postpartum care, are constantly in-demand. L&D nurses are also among the highest-paid nurses in the country, and one of the travel nursing positions with the highest pay. However, before you sign the contract, consider a few things first. While you will be taking care of healthy patients in this area, you must be ready to handle any emergencies that could occur. These may include emergency c-sections and many others. If you are up for the challenge, then this could be a fantastic opportunity for you. 

3. Emergency Room or ER Nurse

Do you enjoy a fast-paced environment while working as a nurse? If you do, then working as an ER nurse is the best place for you. Many travel nurses can work in this department and earn more pay than their staff job. Keep in mind that working in the ER means you have to constantly use your critical thinking skills, so if you love the idea of solving problems, this could be the right place for you. When looking for an ER position it is always good to look at the hospital trauma level, it may be more acute than your used to.

4. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurse or PICU Nurse/ Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or NICU

As a travel nurse, you will have the chance to work with some of the latest technology used in childcare with plenty of nursing opportunities in states like Texas, New York, New Jersey, California, and many others. 

5. Medical-Surgical/Telemetry Nurse

The need for nurses with exceptional skills and knowledge in medical-surgical nursing is in demand these days. Since the number of Covid patients is still elevated, there is always a need for nurses in this area. Travel nurses can apply for this position and earn up to  $5,000/week. If you are a nurse who can handle several patients and can manage time effectively, this could be an excellent opportunity to take.

6. Operating Room Nurse or OR Nurse

One of the most interesting areas and travel nursing positions with the highest pay belongs to the Operating Room. You will be a valuable asset to many hospitals across the country for travel nurses with perioperative skills. If you are certified at a specific OR skill or have a wide range of operating room experience, t you can snag any  OR position, 

In Closing

Consider also the location of the place for your travel nursing assignment. Some states pay higher than others. Now that you know which areas pay travel nurses the most, find a good agency that can get you a position in these areas. It is also an excellent option to do more research on travel nursing before asking for an assignment. That way, you know what to expect and still earn more than staff. 

 

EP 138: How’s Travel Nursing Going in Texas

EP 138: How’s Travel Nursing Going in Texas

EP 138: How’s Travel Nursing Going in Texas

 

Breaks vs. Cali 

Travel nursing is fun! You get to experience the different parts of the country. But how’s travel nursing in other states? Currently, we are in Texas, we have breaks totaling 30 min versus California we had a total of 1 hour of breaks. Things are different because we do not have a break nurse on the unit. In Texas, there is something called a task nurse instead to help the nurses on the unit.

Delayed Start 

Even as experienced travelers we ran into roadblocks. This was our first contract that didn’t go according to plan, we started on 10/25 instead of 10/11. Things we had to plan out when it comes to starting dates are; flights, housing, and transportation.

Charting system Meditech vs. Epic

One of the most frequent tools we use in the hospitals to complete our job is the medical electronic record. In our Texas contract Meditech is completely different from Epic. It is like comparing Windows 98 to the new Macbook system. 

Paper Charting 

Segwaying from an older charting system, there are fewer spots to chart important information such as medication wasted. So to continue tracking things like high-risk medication, in our current contract we need to document by drips by paper in the ICU. The rounding sheet is still paper copied through most health systems. 

Working Night Shift

Even if you can’t change your shifts, what you do before, during, and after the shift can make a huge difference to your sleepiness and your general mood we realized. We have 4 years of experience working nights so we didn’t have too much of an issue getting back to working 7p – 7a. 

3-day Orientation 

This was the biggest shocker, that they gave us three days of orientation on a travel nursing assignment. In most places, you will get a full shift if you’re lucky and sometimes you’ll get 4 hours. 

Same Schedule 

This is something we always strive for as travel nurses. Since we have only 1 car in Texas, it’s crucial to have the same schedule. Usually, on orientation week you will be able to meet the manager or scheduler, to talk about your schedule.

Getting paid for CBLs

Before you set out, make sure how the travel nursing contract works. You will have to sit through a few hours of education health streams for your facility. This can take sometimes up to 8 hours, make sure you get paid for everything from your agency if it’s not on the facility. 

Reimbursements 

If you applied to a new state for your license to travel nurse, save all your receipts! One negative of having a California license is having to pay for verification to another state which costs $100 per license just for verification from California. The license fee total may cost up to $400+, make sure you get your money back for the hard work as a nurse. 

No BP Recycle on Monitors 

As ICU nurses we like to know our vital signs in real-time. In this hospital, they have G.E monitors that don’t allow you to cycle your cuff in the nurse’s station

Nursing Fact Sheet

  • Nursing is the nation’s largest healthcare profession, with more than 3.8 million registered nurses (RNs) nationwide. Of all licensed RNs, 84.5% are employed in nursing.
  • The federal government projects that more than 200,000 new registered nurse positions will be created each year from 2016-2026. 
  • Registered Nurses comprise one of the largest segments of the U.S. workforce as a whole and are among the highest paying large occupations. Nearly 58% of RNs worked in general medical and surgical hospitals, where RN salaries averaged $70,000 per year according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 19% growth by the year 2022.
  • Nurses comprise the largest component of the healthcare workforce, are the primary providers of hospital patient care, and deliver most of the nation’s long-term care.

If you are interested to work in Austin, check out our Austin, Texas travel nurse experience here 👇

SHOW NOTES:

0:00 Cup of Nurses Intro
2:14 Episode Introduction
5:44 Breaks vs Cali
12:22 Delayed Start of Contract
15:14 Charting System Meditech vs Epic
18:20 Paper Charting
19:58 Working Night Shift
24:40 Same Schedule
26:14 Getting Paid for CBLs
27:16 Reimbursements
28:09 No BP Recycle on Monitors